2018 NIRSA Recreation Facilities Institute Schedule2018-12-04T13:10:53+00:00

This schedule is subject to change. Please contact us if you have any questions.

Registration

9:00 am-10:00 am • Mezzanine Foyer

Stop by the NIRSA registration desk to pick up your name badge.


Preconference Facility Tours, presented by CORE Health and Fitness

9:30 am-5:30 pm • Off Site

Presented by CORE Health and Fitness, attendees will tour Barry University, UHealth Fitness and Wellness Center, and Marlins Park. Lunch will be included and transportation will depart from and return to the host hotel.

Registration

8:00 am-9:15 am • Mezzanine Foyer

Stop by the NIRSA registration desk to pick up your name badge.


Welcome & Keynote, presented by Matrix

9:15 am-10:30 am • Pan Am 1 2

Presented by Matrix


Rec-Connect: Maximize student well-being through campus culture, built spaces and integrated programming

10:45 am-11:45 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Marti Tomlin, University of Richmond; Heather Sadowski, University of Richmond; Jim Kovach, VMDO Architects
CEUs: .1

Facilities at higher education institutions are fundamentally shifting in how they are planned, designed, and used by university communities. Campuses are increasingly de-siloing departments in order to prioritize programmatic overlaps, centralize service and resource offerings, and reach as many students as possible with a renewed focus on wellbeing. With the goal to promote student success through the fusion of recreation and well-being offerings, the University of Richmond’s Well-Being Center promotes connectivity between University Recreation, Health Promotion, Counseling and Psychological Center and Student Health to help students holistically learn how to manage their overall health, cope with stress and other life challenges during their time on campus. Through Rigorous planning and programming investigated investigation, University of Richmond is fostering an upstream approach to build foundational support for healthy habits and a sense of wellbeing on campus.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop and synthesize a facilities program that supports all aspects of student wellness including the mental, physical, emotional, nutritional, and spiritual elements that, together, support wellbeing.
  • Identify ways to maximize transparency and openness to help connect students with a diverse range of wellbeing programs and resources that support an upstream approach to health and wellness.
  • Leverage spatial adjacencies to create synergies between student recreation, student health, student counseling, and athletics.

Planning for Change: Master Planning and Design with Adaptation in Mind

10:45 am-11:45 am • Pan Am 3 4
CEUs: .1

How can we best serve campus recreation needs now, in 5 years, 10 years, and beyond? This interactive session will review how adaptability can be applied in master planning and real-world design applications to allow for a variety of programming options. We will explore these considerations with three separate scenarios: first in recreation master planning, second with a renovation/addition project, and third a new indoor fieldhouse facility constructed in partnership with a community. Using this foundation, we’ll brainstorm about the role of flexible design in recreation programming, new ideas for traditional recreation spaces, and possibilities for the future. Whether you’re involved in small or large spaces or indoor or outdoor facilities, don’t miss this one-of-a-kind session!

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize how to make current, traditional recreation spaces more multi-functional to increase programming and diversify offerings on campus while mitigating the cost of building more infrastructure.
  • Understand how to weave recreation master planning into a broader campus master plan to garner approval and support from the community and bring new opportunities to fruition.
  • Analyze trends in recreation to determine how they can be applied in a multi-purpose manner with other compatible programming to meet current needs while allowing for future adaptations.

Facility Tours, Day 1–presented by Technogym

noon-6:00 pm • Off Site

Presented by Technogym, attendees will tour Florida Atlantic University (Recreation and Fitness Center and FAU Stadium) and Nova Southeastern University.

Interval Training (Early Morning Workout)

7:00 am-7:45 am • [no room]

A 45 minute workout of low-to high-intensity workouts interspersed with rest or relief periods. Join us prior to a full day of sessions so your mind is clear and ready to take on the Facilities Institute with flying colors.


Healthy Buildings, Happy Occupants: Improving the Wellbeing of Both

8:30 am-9:30 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Josh Jacobs, LEED AP, UL; Jim Stalford, Mondo America Inc.
CEUs: .1

This session will help architects, designers, and facility directors deepen their understanding of the impact of indoor air pollution on human health. Attendees will learn strategies for creating healthy environments, as well as explore the cost and financial benefits associated with sustainable design and product selection. This session will also identify helpful resources that aid in designing and maintaining a recreational space with a healthy indoor environment.

Core Competencies: Facility Management, Planning Design, Research Evaluation

Learning Objectives:

  • Articulate the difference between low volatile organic compound (VOC) emission and low VOC content.
  • Identify sources of indoor air pollutants and their impact on human health.
  • Realize the importance of sustainability and transparency for making smarter product selection decisions.

That Coulda Been Me: Enacting Your EAP and Supporting Your Team During an Emergency

8:30 am-9:30 am • Constellation
Presented by: Ross Rodriguez, RCRSP, The University of Texas at Austin Recreational Sports; Erin Wells, The University of Texas at Austin
CEUs: .1

Following the real-life implementation of an Emergency Action Plan (EAP), this program aims to help answer the question of “Would I be ready if it happened to me?” This presentation will focus on the importance of teamwork to enact a successful EAP and discuss how the situation doesn’t end once the scene is declared safe by Emergency Response personnel.

Core Competencies: Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the necessity of a thorough EAP and teaching it to all levels of staff.
  • Compare the steps taken in the aftermath of an incident at another institution to the protocols in place on your campus.
  • Access available resources in the event of a similar situation on your campus.

Coffee Break

9:30 am-9:45 am • Foyer outside of the meeting rooms

Take a quick break between sessions to grab a cup of joe!


Planning Design

9:45 am-10:45 am • Pan Am 1 2
Presented by: Bill Massey, Sasaki; Chris Sgarzi, Sasaki
CEUs: .1

By focusing on the connections between recreation and other facilities such as health services, counseling, and human resources, as well as numerous interrelated academic facilities, colleges and universities can significantly expand and enhance their wellness initiatives by leveraging existing campus relationships and programs. In this panel, Sasaki Sports Practice Principals Bill Massey and Chris Sgarzi explore the opportunities, challenges, and successes they are seeing and designing for in their current recreation projects across the country. In addition to their own experiences they will be sharing input from a panel of recreation directors that presented with Sasaki at the NIRSA Region 1 conference on the same subject. Use these first hand accounts to learn how your rec department can provide a broader range of wellness services that uncover opportunities for collaboration.

Core Competencies: Programming, Human Resource Management, Facility Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the benefits of reaching across departmental boundaries to provide often unexpected and beneficial services to your campus community.
  • Identify non-traditional avenues for expanding health and wellness programming.
  • Leverage the lessons learned by other recreation leaders and adapt them to your own campus and programs.

Business Management

11:00 am-noon • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Gavin Myers, AIA, NCARB, Hughes Group Architects; Lynn Reda, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, IIDA, Hughes Group Architects
CEUs: .1

The WELL Building Standard is at the forefront of sustainable design standards. Unlike LEED, Green Globes, and other sustainable design standards, the WELL Building Standard focuses entirely on how the built environment improves the health and wellness of its occupants. WELL applies scientific research to the design of facilities in respect to seven designated concepts: air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort, and mind. A dynamic and prescriptive rating system, WELL can help elevate your facility and its occupants to the next level.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize how the WELL Building Standard aligns with fitness, recreation, and wellness facilities.
  • Identify the differences and synergies between the Well Building Standard and LEED.
  • Show the impacts the WELL Building Standard will have on your facility project not only during planning and construction, but also operationally.

Facility Management

11:00 am-noon • Constellation
Presented by: Michelle Fitzgerald, University of Central Florida; Derek Lower, Florida Polytechnic University
CEUs: Planning Design

Risk Management is a focal point for all recreation professionals and programs. Recreation Administrators mandate procedures and create policies to manage risk, but what goes into this thought process and what results are they producing? Oftentimes, student employees are being asked to enforce policies and procedures, but are they being engaged in the process and receiving an explanation of the “why” behind Risk Management? Students should be aware of their role in managing risk. In this presentation, attendees will hear about the best practices of the University of Central Florida’s Recreation and Wellness Center and how students are taking an active approach in the development, implementation and evaluation of Risk Management policies and procedures. Attendees will be given information and tools to take back with them to their facilities and create their own Risk Management Committees.

Core Competencies: Programming, Personal Professional Qualities, Legal Liability Risk Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Assess the need for a risk management committee at your institution and learn ways to organize and implement a risk management committee.
  • Define the role student employees play in keeping your facility safe and discover ways to implement Risk Management training and development for them.
  • Implement an audit system for both full time and student employees which includes specific training and certification completions needed for each job responsibility.

Networking Social & Expo

noon-2:30 pm • Pan Am 3 4

Let the conversations continue over lunch at the Networking Social & Expo Luncheon! Attendees and Vendors can enjoy a buffet lunch while networking and checking out the latest and greatest products.


Roundtable

2:30 pm-3:45 pm • Pan Am 1 2
Presented by: Marti Tomlin, University of Richmond; Lashica Thomas, Columbus State University; Tina Villard, Rice University

During this 75-minute Facility Roundtable, attendees will have an opportunity to interact with other campus rec professionals and discuss today’s hot topics in facilities. It will be a time to join together and discuss solutions to common issues seen within this area.


A Blueprint for Student Health and Wellness Facilities

4:00 pm-5:00 pm • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Colleen McKenna, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP; Roland Lemke, AIA, LEED AP
CEUs: .1

The focus on health and wellbeing can vary dramatically from one institution to another. This presentation will explore the benefits and potential hurdles of addressing the needs of student and employee wellness programs. Operational paradigms, design fundamentals, environmental factors, and project examples will illustrate the many ways to address these growing needs.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine different definitions of health and wellness on college campuses.
  • Become familiar with the operational, design, and environmental factors within the built environment that influence behavior and outcomes.
  • Study several examples of integrated health and wellness models on college campuses.

The Physicality of Working in Facilities

4:00 pm-5:00 pm • Constellation
Presented by: Lashica Thomas, Columbus State University
CEUs: .1

Working in facilities is so much more than opening a building and getting staff in place. Being the “building person” may include knowing the location of the breaker boxes, operating all timers inside and outside the facility, managing the replacement of furniture, etc. There are so many things that come along with being responsible for the building. This session will focus on how others are staying up-to-date on best practices for managing facilities.

Core Competencies: Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify several options for training techniques regarding the physical operations of your facility.
  • Understand your role in the facilities arena.
  • Gain knowledge on processes that will help to facilitate daily operations.

Facilities Mixer, presented by PLAE

5:00 pm-6:30 pm • River’s End Patio

Immediately following the ed sessions, please plan to join fellow peers and colleagues for appetizers and beverages at the 2018 Facilities Mixer, presented by PLAE. This fantastic networking opportunity will be held in River’s End Patio.

Small Projects, Big Impact: Improving Facilities without Major Renovations

8:30 am-9:30 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Ken Wolters, CENTERS LLC at UMSL; Bob Holub, CENTERS LLC at Marshall University
CEUs: .1

Come and learn how even small projects can provide a big impact in your facility and on your campus. This presentation will focus on examples of facility improvement-related projects with budgets mostly ranging below $50,000. While new projects and major renovations are critical to long- term success, smaller-scale projects can also be vital in meeting campus-specific needs at a more attainable price tag. Presenters will incorporate short and long-term planning, feasibility, justification, funding methods, overall need/impact of projects, outcome of completed projects, and more for your facility planning consideration.

Core Competencies: Facility Management, Planning Design, Business Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Create a short -term project plan for facility upgrades.
  • Define the differences between capital/R&R enhancements and general operational projects.
  • Assess needs versus wants in new and aging facilities.

Planning Design

8:30 am-9:30 am • Pan Am 3 4
Presented by: Dan Sullivan, AIA, LEED BD+C, Hastings+Chivetta Architects; Preston Scott, AIA, LEED BD+C, Hastings+Chivetta Architects
CEUs: .1

How can your recreation facility encourage students, faculty, and staff to work out in the gym, gather with friends to study, and foster a healthy spirit while experiencing a building that challenges the definition of a “healthy building”? This session will focus on connecting the Seven Dimensions of Wellness (Physical, Emotional, Intellectual, Spiritual, Social, Environmental, and Occupational) between individuals and the physical building, whether that be an existing facility needing updates or a brand new facility.

Core Competencies: Philosophy Theory, Personal Professional Qualities, Facility Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Analyze how the seven dimensions of wellness can impact a physical building.
  • Understand how current architectural buzz words like “Active Design,” “Living Building,” and LEED and WELL rating systems can challenge patrons to renewed health and wellbeing.

Coffee Break

9:30 am-9:45 am • Foyer outside of the meeting rooms

Take a quick break between sessions to grab a cup of joe!


A Case Study: Design Considerations, Lessons Learned, Benefits, and Maintenance Protocols when Converting to Artificial Turf

9:45 am-10:45 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Jeremy Battjes, University of Arkansas; Kristin DeAngelo, University of Arkansas
CEUs: .1

The decision to convert natural playing surfaces to artificial turf is one that should receive considerable thought. The University of Arkansas recently converted nearly 9 acres to improve experiences for the student body. Attendees will learn about the project experience, programming benefits, maintenance and operations protocols, and the makes and misses that were associated with the project.

Core Competencies: Facility Management, Planning Design, Business Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the programming benefits of artificial turf in the collegiate recreation environment.
  • Learn maintenance protocols and plans for operation of artificial turf.
  • Identify the essential architect and construction manager qualifications needed when selecting a design team.

Your Role on the Design Team

9:45 am-10:45 am • Pan Am 3 4
Presented by: Jack Patton, AIA, LEED AP, RDG Planning & Design; Nathan Harris, RDG Planning & Design
CEUs: .1

Who, me? I want to run the facility, not design it! As an owner, manager, or operator, your input, guidance, and leadership are critical to the successful programming and design of your building. With your distinct knowledge, you hold the most important keys to the design solution, so learn how and when to apply your talents in creating a new or renovated recreation facility.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the critical importance of your role in design and your important position on the team.
  • Realize the leadership required from you to change your facility design from so-so to wonderful!

Facility Tours, Day 2

11:00 am-4:00 pm • Off Site

Attendees will tour University of Miami-Herbert Wellness Center and Florida International University.

Registration

8:30 am-9:30 am • Mezzanine Foyer

Stop by the NIRSA registration desk to pick up your name badge.


Preconference Facility Tours, presented by CORE Health and Fitness

9:30 am-5:30 pm • Off Site

Presented by CORE Health and Fitness, attendees will tour Barry University, UHealth Fitness and Wellness Center, and Marlins Park. Lunch will be included and transportation will depart from and return to the host hotel.

Registration

8:00 am-9:15 am • Mezzanine Foyer

Stop by the NIRSA registration desk to pick up your name badge.


Welcome & Keynote, presented by Matrix

9:15 am-10:30 am • Pan Am 1 2

Presented by Matrix


Rec-Connect: Maximize student well-being through campus culture, built spaces and integrated programming

10:45 am-11:45 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Marti Tomlin, University of Richmond; Heather Sadowski, University of Richmond; Jim Kovach, VMDO Architects
CEUs: .1

Facilities at higher education institutions are fundamentally shifting in how they are planned, designed, and used by university communities. Campuses are increasingly de-siloing departments in order to prioritize programmatic overlaps, centralize service and resource offerings, and reach as many students as possible with a renewed focus on wellbeing. With the goal to promote student success through the fusion of recreation and well-being offerings, the University of Richmond’s Well-Being Center promotes connectivity between University Recreation, Health Promotion, Counseling and Psychological Center and Student Health to help students holistically learn how to manage their overall health, cope with stress and other life challenges during their time on campus. Through Rigorous planning and programming investigated investigation, University of Richmond is fostering an upstream approach to build foundational support for healthy habits and a sense of wellbeing on campus.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop and synthesize a facilities program that supports all aspects of student wellness including the mental, physical, emotional, nutritional, and spiritual elements that, together, support wellbeing.
  • Identify ways to maximize transparency and openness to help connect students with a diverse range of wellbeing programs and resources that support an upstream approach to health and wellness.
  • Leverage spatial adjacencies to create synergies between student recreation, student health, student counseling, and athletics.

Planning for Change: Master Planning and Design with Adaptation in Mind

10:45 am-11:45 am • Pan Am 3 4
CEUs: .1

How can we best serve campus recreation needs now, in 5 years, 10 years, and beyond? This interactive session will review how adaptability can be applied in master planning and real-world design applications to allow for a variety of programming options. We will explore these considerations with three separate scenarios: first in recreation master planning, second with a renovation/addition project, and third a new indoor fieldhouse facility constructed in partnership with a community. Using this foundation, we’ll brainstorm about the role of flexible design in recreation programming, new ideas for traditional recreation spaces, and possibilities for the future. Whether you’re involved in small or large spaces or indoor or outdoor facilities, don’t miss this one-of-a-kind session!

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize how to make current, traditional recreation spaces more multi-functional to increase programming and diversify offerings on campus while mitigating the cost of building more infrastructure.
  • Understand how to weave recreation master planning into a broader campus master plan to garner approval and support from the community and bring new opportunities to fruition.
  • Analyze trends in recreation to determine how they can be applied in a multi-purpose manner with other compatible programming to meet current needs while allowing for future adaptations.

Facility Tours, Day 1–presented by Technogym

noon-6:00 pm • Off Site

Presented by Technogym, attendees will tour Florida Atlantic University (Recreation and Fitness Center and FAU Stadium) and Nova Southeastern University.

Interval Training (Early Morning Workout)

7:00 am-7:45 am • [no room]

A 45 minute workout of low-to high-intensity workouts interspersed with rest or relief periods. Join us prior to a full day of sessions so your mind is clear and ready to take on the Facilities Institute with flying colors.


Healthy Buildings, Happy Occupants: Improving the Wellbeing of Both

8:30 am-9:30 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Josh Jacobs, LEED AP, UL; Jim Stalford, Mondo America Inc.
CEUs: .1

This session will help architects, designers, and facility directors deepen their understanding of the impact of indoor air pollution on human health. Attendees will learn strategies for creating healthy environments, as well as explore the cost and financial benefits associated with sustainable design and product selection. This session will also identify helpful resources that aid in designing and maintaining a recreational space with a healthy indoor environment.

Core Competencies: Facility Management, Planning Design, Research Evaluation

Learning Objectives:

  • Articulate the difference between low volatile organic compound (VOC) emission and low VOC content.
  • Identify sources of indoor air pollutants and their impact on human health.
  • Realize the importance of sustainability and transparency for making smarter product selection decisions.

That Coulda Been Me: Enacting Your EAP and Supporting Your Team During an Emergency

8:30 am-9:30 am • Constellation
Presented by: Ross Rodriguez, RCRSP, The University of Texas at Austin Recreational Sports; Erin Wells, The University of Texas at Austin
CEUs: .1

Following the real-life implementation of an Emergency Action Plan (EAP), this program aims to help answer the question of “Would I be ready if it happened to me?” This presentation will focus on the importance of teamwork to enact a successful EAP and discuss how the situation doesn’t end once the scene is declared safe by Emergency Response personnel.

Core Competencies: Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the necessity of a thorough EAP and teaching it to all levels of staff.
  • Compare the steps taken in the aftermath of an incident at another institution to the protocols in place on your campus.
  • Access available resources in the event of a similar situation on your campus.

Coffee Break

9:30 am-9:45 am • Foyer outside of the meeting rooms

Take a quick break between sessions to grab a cup of joe!


Planning Design

9:45 am-10:45 am • Pan Am 1 2
Presented by: Bill Massey, Sasaki; Chris Sgarzi, Sasaki
CEUs: .1

By focusing on the connections between recreation and other facilities such as health services, counseling, and human resources, as well as numerous interrelated academic facilities, colleges and universities can significantly expand and enhance their wellness initiatives by leveraging existing campus relationships and programs. In this panel, Sasaki Sports Practice Principals Bill Massey and Chris Sgarzi explore the opportunities, challenges, and successes they are seeing and designing for in their current recreation projects across the country. In addition to their own experiences they will be sharing input from a panel of recreation directors that presented with Sasaki at the NIRSA Region 1 conference on the same subject. Use these first hand accounts to learn how your rec department can provide a broader range of wellness services that uncover opportunities for collaboration.

Core Competencies: Programming, Human Resource Management, Facility Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the benefits of reaching across departmental boundaries to provide often unexpected and beneficial services to your campus community.
  • Identify non-traditional avenues for expanding health and wellness programming.
  • Leverage the lessons learned by other recreation leaders and adapt them to your own campus and programs.

Business Management

11:00 am-noon • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Gavin Myers, AIA, NCARB, Hughes Group Architects; Lynn Reda, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, IIDA, Hughes Group Architects
CEUs: .1

The WELL Building Standard is at the forefront of sustainable design standards. Unlike LEED, Green Globes, and other sustainable design standards, the WELL Building Standard focuses entirely on how the built environment improves the health and wellness of its occupants. WELL applies scientific research to the design of facilities in respect to seven designated concepts: air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort, and mind. A dynamic and prescriptive rating system, WELL can help elevate your facility and its occupants to the next level.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize how the WELL Building Standard aligns with fitness, recreation, and wellness facilities.
  • Identify the differences and synergies between the Well Building Standard and LEED.
  • Show the impacts the WELL Building Standard will have on your facility project not only during planning and construction, but also operationally.

Facility Management

11:00 am-noon • Constellation
Presented by: Michelle Fitzgerald, University of Central Florida; Derek Lower, Florida Polytechnic University
CEUs: Planning Design

Risk Management is a focal point for all recreation professionals and programs. Recreation Administrators mandate procedures and create policies to manage risk, but what goes into this thought process and what results are they producing? Oftentimes, student employees are being asked to enforce policies and procedures, but are they being engaged in the process and receiving an explanation of the “why” behind Risk Management? Students should be aware of their role in managing risk. In this presentation, attendees will hear about the best practices of the University of Central Florida’s Recreation and Wellness Center and how students are taking an active approach in the development, implementation and evaluation of Risk Management policies and procedures. Attendees will be given information and tools to take back with them to their facilities and create their own Risk Management Committees.

Core Competencies: Programming, Personal Professional Qualities, Legal Liability Risk Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Assess the need for a risk management committee at your institution and learn ways to organize and implement a risk management committee.
  • Define the role student employees play in keeping your facility safe and discover ways to implement Risk Management training and development for them.
  • Implement an audit system for both full time and student employees which includes specific training and certification completions needed for each job responsibility.

Networking Social & Expo

noon-2:30 pm • Pan Am 3 4

Let the conversations continue over lunch at the Networking Social & Expo Luncheon! Attendees and Vendors can enjoy a buffet lunch while networking and checking out the latest and greatest products.


Roundtable

2:30 pm-3:45 pm • Pan Am 1 2
Presented by: Lashica Thomas, Columbus State University; Marti Tomlin, University of Richmond; Tina Villard, Rice University

During this 75-minute Facility Roundtable, attendees will have an opportunity to interact with other campus rec professionals and discuss today’s hot topics in facilities. It will be a time to join together and discuss solutions to common issues seen within this area.


A Blueprint for Student Health and Wellness Facilities

4:00 pm-5:00 pm • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Colleen McKenna, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP; Roland Lemke, AIA, LEED AP
CEUs: .1

The focus on health and wellbeing can vary dramatically from one institution to another. This presentation will explore the benefits and potential hurdles of addressing the needs of student and employee wellness programs. Operational paradigms, design fundamentals, environmental factors, and project examples will illustrate the many ways to address these growing needs.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine different definitions of health and wellness on college campuses.
  • Become familiar with the operational, design, and environmental factors within the built environment that influence behavior and outcomes.
  • Study several examples of integrated health and wellness models on college campuses.

The Physicality of Working in Facilities

4:00 pm-5:00 pm • Constellation
Presented by: Lashica Thomas, Columbus State University
CEUs: .1

Working in facilities is so much more than opening a building and getting staff in place. Being the “building person” may include knowing the location of the breaker boxes, operating all timers inside and outside the facility, managing the replacement of furniture, etc. There are so many things that come along with being responsible for the building. This session will focus on how others are staying up-to-date on best practices for managing facilities.

Core Competencies: Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify several options for training techniques regarding the physical operations of your facility.
  • Understand your role in the facilities arena.
  • Gain knowledge on processes that will help to facilitate daily operations.

Facilities Mixer, presented by PLAE

5:00 pm-6:30 pm • River’s End Patio

Immediately following the ed sessions, please plan to join fellow peers and colleagues for appetizers and beverages at the 2018 Facilities Mixer, presented by PLAE. This fantastic networking opportunity will be held in River’s End Patio.

Small Projects, Big Impact: Improving Facilities without Major Renovations

8:30 am-9:30 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Ken Wolters, CENTERS LLC at UMSL; Bob Holub, CENTERS LLC at Marshall University
CEUs: .1

Come and learn how even small projects can provide a big impact in your facility and on your campus. This presentation will focus on examples of facility improvement-related projects with budgets mostly ranging below $50,000. While new projects and major renovations are critical to long- term success, smaller-scale projects can also be vital in meeting campus-specific needs at a more attainable price tag. Presenters will incorporate short and long-term planning, feasibility, justification, funding methods, overall need/impact of projects, outcome of completed projects, and more for your facility planning consideration.

Core Competencies: Facility Management, Planning Design, Business Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Create a short -term project plan for facility upgrades.
  • Define the differences between capital/R&R enhancements and general operational projects.
  • Assess needs versus wants in new and aging facilities.

Planning Design

8:30 am-9:30 am • Pan Am 3 4
Presented by: Dan Sullivan, AIA, LEED BD+C, Hastings+Chivetta Architects; Preston Scott, AIA, LEED BD+C, Hastings+Chivetta Architects
CEUs: .1

How can your recreation facility encourage students, faculty, and staff to work out in the gym, gather with friends to study, and foster a healthy spirit while experiencing a building that challenges the definition of a “healthy building”? This session will focus on connecting the Seven Dimensions of Wellness (Physical, Emotional, Intellectual, Spiritual, Social, Environmental, and Occupational) between individuals and the physical building, whether that be an existing facility needing updates or a brand new facility.

Core Competencies: Philosophy Theory, Personal Professional Qualities, Facility Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Analyze how the seven dimensions of wellness can impact a physical building.
  • Understand how current architectural buzz words like “Active Design,” “Living Building,” and LEED and WELL rating systems can challenge patrons to renewed health and wellbeing.

Coffee Break

9:30 am-9:45 am • Foyer outside of the meeting rooms

Take a quick break between sessions to grab a cup of joe!


A Case Study: Design Considerations, Lessons Learned, Benefits, and Maintenance Protocols when Converting to Artificial Turf

9:45 am-10:45 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Jeremy Battjes, University of Arkansas; Kristin DeAngelo, University of Arkansas
CEUs: .1

The decision to convert natural playing surfaces to artificial turf is one that should receive considerable thought. The University of Arkansas recently converted nearly 9 acres to improve experiences for the student body. Attendees will learn about the project experience, programming benefits, maintenance and operations protocols, and the makes and misses that were associated with the project.

Core Competencies: Facility Management, Planning Design, Business Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the programming benefits of artificial turf in the collegiate recreation environment.
  • Learn maintenance protocols and plans for operation of artificial turf.
  • Identify the essential architect and construction manager qualifications needed when selecting a design team.

Your Role on the Design Team

9:45 am-10:45 am • Pan Am 3 4
Presented by: Jack Patton, AIA, LEED AP, RDG Planning & Design; Nathan Harris, RDG Planning & Design
CEUs: .1

Who, me? I want to run the facility, not design it! As an owner, manager, or operator, your input, guidance, and leadership are critical to the successful programming and design of your building. With your distinct knowledge, you hold the most important keys to the design solution, so learn how and when to apply your talents in creating a new or renovated recreation facility.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management, Planning Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the critical importance of your role in design and your important position on the team.
  • Realize the leadership required from you to change your facility design from so-so to wonderful!

Facility Tours, Day 2

11:00 am-4:00 pm • Off Site

Attendees will tour University of Miami-Herbert Wellness Center and Florida International University.

Registration

8:30 am-9:30 am • Mezzanine Foyer

Stop by the NIRSA registration desk to pick up your name badge.


Preconference Facility Tours, presented by CORE Health and Fitness

9:30 am-5:30 pm • Off Site

Presented by CORE Health and Fitness, attendees will tour Barry University, UHealth Fitness and Wellness Center, and Marlins Park. Lunch will be included and transportation will depart from and return to the host hotel.

Registration

8:00 am-9:15 am • Mezzanine Foyer

Stop by the NIRSA registration desk to pick up your name badge.


Welcome & Keynote, presented by Matrix

9:15 am-10:30 am • Pan Am 1 2

Arash has committed his career to the development of sport and recreation facilities that promote student learning and well-being. His passion for the success of collegiate students drives innovative designs of recreation centers across California and Texas. Arash guides clients, students and athletes through the planning, programming and design process to create sustainable and award-winning sport and recreation facilities, while his technical expertise has gained him recognition as an industry leader.


Rec-Connect: Maximize student well-being through campus culture, built spaces and integrated programming

10:45 am-11:45 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Marti Tomlin, University of Richmond; Heather Sadowski, University of Richmond; Jim Kovach, VMDO Architects
CEUs: .1

Facilities at higher education institutions are fundamentally shifting in how they are planned, designed, and used by university communities. Campuses are increasingly de-siloing departments in order to prioritize programmatic overlaps, centralize service and resource offerings, and reach as many students as possible with a renewed focus on wellbeing. With the goal to promote student success through the fusion of recreation and well-being offerings, the University of Richmond’s Well-Being Center promotes connectivity between University Recreation, Health Promotion, Counseling and Psychological Center and Student Health to help students holistically learn how to manage their overall health, cope with stress and other life challenges during their time on campus. Through Rigorous planning and programming investigated investigation, University of Richmond is fostering an upstream approach to build foundational support for healthy habits and a sense of wellbeing on campus.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop and synthesize a facilities program that supports all aspects of student wellness including the mental, physical, emotional, nutritional, and spiritual elements that, together, support wellbeing.
  • Identify ways to maximize transparency and openness to help connect students with a diverse range of wellbeing programs and resources that support an upstream approach to health and wellness.
  • Leverage spatial adjacencies to create synergies between student recreation, student health, student counseling, and athletics.

Planning for Change: Master Planning and Design with Adaptation in Mind

10:45 am-11:45 am • Pan Am 3 4
Presented by: Kevin Armstrong, AIA, LEED AP, AIA, LEED AP, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture; Frank Buono, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture
CEUs: .1

How can we best serve campus recreation needs now, in 5 years, 10 years, and beyond? This interactive session will review how adaptability can be applied in master planning and real-world design applications to allow for a variety of programming options. We will explore these considerations with three separate scenarios: first in recreation master planning, second with a renovation/addition project, and third a new indoor fieldhouse facility constructed in partnership with a community. Using this foundation, we’ll brainstorm about the role of flexible design in recreation programming, new ideas for traditional recreation spaces, and possibilities for the future. Whether you’re involved in small or large spaces or indoor or outdoor facilities, don’t miss this one-of-a-kind session!

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize how to make current, traditional recreation spaces more multi-functional to increase programming and diversify offerings on campus while mitigating the cost of building more infrastructure.
  • Understand how to weave recreation master planning into a broader campus master plan to garner approval and support from the community and bring new opportunities to fruition.
  • Analyze trends in recreation to determine how they can be applied in a multi-purpose manner with other compatible programming to meet current needs while allowing for future adaptations.

Facility Tours, Day 1–presented by Technogym

noon-6:00 pm • Off Site

Presented by Technogym, attendees will tour Florida Atlantic University (Recreation and Fitness Center and FAU Stadium) and Nova Southeastern University.

Interval Training (Early Morning Workout)

7:00 am-7:45 am • Pan Am 1 2 Terrace
Presented by: Lauren Davis, Columbus State University

A 45 minute workout of low-to high-intensity workouts interspersed with rest or relief periods. Join us prior to a full day of sessions so your mind is clear and ready to take on the Facilities Institute with flying colors.


Healthy Buildings, Happy Occupants: Improving the Wellbeing of Both

8:30 am-9:30 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Josh Jacobs, LEED AP, UL; Jim Stalford, Mondo America Inc.
CEUs: .1

This session will help architects, designers, and facility directors deepen their understanding of the impact of indoor air pollution on human health. Attendees will learn strategies for creating healthy environments, as well as explore the cost and financial benefits associated with sustainable design and product selection. This session will also identify helpful resources that aid in designing and maintaining a recreational space with a healthy indoor environment.

Core Competencies: Facility Management/Planning/Design, Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives:

  • Articulate the difference between low volatile organic compound (VOC) emission and low VOC content.
  • Identify sources of indoor air pollutants and their impact on human health.
  • Realize the importance of sustainability and transparency for making smarter product selection decisions.

That Coulda Been Me: Enacting Your EAP and Supporting Your Team During an Emergency

8:30 am-9:30 am • Constellation
Presented by: Ross Rodriguez, RCRSP, The University of Texas at Austin Recreational Sports; Erin Wells, The University of Texas at Austin
CEUs: .1

Following the real-life implementation of an Emergency Action Plan (EAP), this program aims to help answer the question of “Would I be ready if it happened to me?” This presentation will focus on the importance of teamwork to enact a successful EAP and discuss how the situation doesn’t end once the scene is declared safe by Emergency Response personnel.

Core Competencies: Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the necessity of a thorough EAP and teaching it to all levels of staff.
  • Compare the steps taken in the aftermath of an incident at another institution to the protocols in place on your campus.
  • Access available resources in the event of a similar situation on your campus.

Coffee Break

9:30 am-9:45 am • Foyer outside of the meeting rooms

Take a quick break between sessions to grab a cup of joe!


Wellbeing Roundtable

9:45 am-10:45 am • Pan Am 1 2
Presented by: Marti Tomlin, University of Richmond

During this 75-minute Wellbeing Roundtable, attendees will have an opportunity to interact with other campus rec professionals and discuss today’s hot topics in wellbeing. It will be a time to join together and discuss solutions to common issues seen within this area.


Well, Well, Well: A New Perspective on Facility Design Using the WELL Building Standard

11:00 am-noon • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Gavin Myers, AIA, NCARB, Hughes Group Architects; Lynn Reda, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, IIDA, Hughes Group Architects
CEUs: .1

The WELL Building Standard is at the forefront of sustainable design standards. Unlike LEED, Green Globes, and other sustainable design standards, the WELL Building Standard focuses entirely on how the built environment improves the health and wellness of its occupants. WELL applies scientific research to the design of facilities in respect to seven designated concepts: air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort, and mind. A dynamic and prescriptive rating system, WELL can help elevate your facility and its occupants to the next level.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management/Planning/Design, Business Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize how the WELL Building Standard aligns with fitness, recreation, and wellness facilities.
  • Identify the differences and synergies between the Well Building Standard and LEED.
  • Show the impacts the WELL Building Standard will have on your facility project not only during planning and construction, but also operationally.

Do You Need a Risk Management Committee?

11:00 am-noon • Constellation
Presented by: Michelle Fitzgerald, University of Central Florida; Derek Lower, Florida Polytechnic University
CEUs: .1

Risk Management is a focal point for all recreation professionals and programs. Recreation Administrators mandate procedures and create policies to manage risk, but what goes into this thought process and what results are they producing? Oftentimes, student employees are being asked to enforce policies and procedures, but are they being engaged in the process and receiving an explanation of the “why” behind Risk Management? Students should be aware of their role in managing risk. In this presentation, attendees will hear about the best practices of the University of Central Florida’s Recreation and Wellness Center and how students are taking an active approach in the development, implementation and evaluation of Risk Management policies and procedures. Attendees will be given information and tools to take back with them to their facilities and create their own Risk Management Committees.

Core Competencies: Programming, Personal & Professional Qualities, Legal Liability & Risk Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Assess the need for a risk management committee at your institution and learn ways to organize and implement a risk management committee.
  • Define the role student employees play in keeping your facility safe and discover ways to implement Risk Management training and development for them.
  • Implement an audit system for both full time and student employees which includes specific training and certification completions needed for each job responsibility.

Networking Luncheon & Expo

noon-2:30 pm • Pan Am 3 4

Let the conversations continue over lunch at the Networking Social & Expo Luncheon! Attendees and Vendors can enjoy a buffet lunch while networking and checking out the latest and greatest products.


Facility Roundtable

2:30 pm-3:45 pm • Pan Am 1 2
Presented by: Lashica Thomas, Columbus State University

During this 75-minute Facility Roundtable, attendees will have an opportunity to interact with other campus rec professionals and discuss today’s hot topics in facilities. It will be a time to join together and discuss solutions to common issues seen within this area.


A Blueprint for Student Health and Wellness Facilities

4:00 pm-5:00 pm • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Colleen McKenna, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP; Roland Lemke, AIA, LEED AP
CEUs: .1

The focus on health and wellbeing can vary dramatically from one institution to another. This presentation will explore the benefits and potential hurdles of addressing the needs of student and employee wellness programs. Operational paradigms, design fundamentals, environmental factors, and project examples will illustrate the many ways to address these growing needs.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine different definitions of health and wellness on college campuses.
  • Become familiar with the operational, design, and environmental factors within the built environment that influence behavior and outcomes.
  • Study several examples of integrated health and wellness models on college campuses.

The Physicality of Working in Facilities

4:00 pm-5:00 pm • Constellation
Presented by: Lashica Thomas, Columbus State University
CEUs: .1

Working in facilities is so much more than opening a building and getting staff in place. Being the “building person” may include knowing the location of the breaker boxes, operating all timers inside and outside the facility, managing the replacement of furniture, etc. There are so many things that come along with being responsible for the building. This session will focus on how others are staying up-to-date on best practices for managing facilities.

Core Competencies: Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify several options for training techniques regarding the physical operations of your facility.
  • Understand your role in the facilities arena.
  • Gain knowledge on processes that will help to facilitate daily operations.

Facilities Mixer, presented by PLAE

5:00 pm-6:30 pm • River’s End Patio

Immediately following the ed sessions, please plan to join fellow peers and colleagues for appetizers and beverages at the 2018 Facilities Mixer, presented by PLAE. This fantastic networking opportunity will be held in River’s End Patio.

Small Projects, Big Impact: Improving Facilities without Major Renovations

8:30 am-9:30 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Ken Wolters, CENTERS LLC at UMSL; Bob Holub, CENTERS LLC at Marshall University
CEUs: .1

Come and learn how even small projects can provide a big impact in your facility and on your campus. This presentation will focus on examples of facility improvement-related projects with budgets mostly ranging below $50,000. While new projects and major renovations are critical to long- term success, smaller-scale projects can also be vital in meeting campus-specific needs at a more attainable price tag. Presenters will incorporate short and long-term planning, feasibility, justification, funding methods, overall need/impact of projects, outcome of completed projects, and more for your facility planning consideration.

Core Competencies: Facility Management/Planning/Design, Business Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Create a short -term project plan for facility upgrades.
  • Define the differences between capital/R&R enhancements and general operational projects.
  • Assess needs versus wants in new and aging facilities.

Body, Mind, Spirit, and Facility: Connecting Active Design and Personal Wellbeing

8:30 am-9:30 am • Pan Am 3 4
Presented by: Dan Sullivan, AIA, LEED BD+C, Hastings+Chivetta Architects; Preston Scott, AIA, LEED BD+C, Hastings+Chivetta Architects
CEUs: .1

How can your recreation facility encourage students, faculty, and staff to work out in the gym, gather with friends to study, and foster a healthy spirit while experiencing a building that challenges the definition of a “healthy building”? This session will focus on connecting the Seven Dimensions of Wellness (Physical, Emotional, Intellectual, Spiritual, Social, Environmental, and Occupational) between individuals and the physical building, whether that be an existing facility needing updates or a brand new facility.

Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory, Personal & Professional Qualities, Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Analyze how the seven dimensions of wellness can impact a physical building.
  • Understand how current architectural buzz words like “Active Design,” “Living Building,” and LEED and WELL rating systems can challenge patrons to renewed health and wellbeing.

Coffee Break

9:30 am-9:45 am • Foyer outside of the meeting rooms

Take a quick break between sessions to grab a cup of joe!


A Case Study: Design Considerations, Lessons Learned, Benefits, and Maintenance Protocols when Converting to Artificial Turf

9:45 am-10:45 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Jeremy Battjes, University of Arkansas; Kristin DeAngelo, University of Arkansas
CEUs: .1

The decision to convert natural playing surfaces to artificial turf is one that should receive considerable thought. The University of Arkansas recently converted nearly 9 acres to improve experiences for the student body. Attendees will learn about the project experience, programming benefits, maintenance and operations protocols, and the makes and misses that were associated with the project.

Core Competencies: Facility Management/Planning/Design, Business Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the programming benefits of artificial turf in the collegiate recreation environment.
  • Learn maintenance protocols and plans for operation of artificial turf.
  • Identify the essential architect and construction manager qualifications needed when selecting a design team.

Your Role on the Design Team

9:45 am-10:45 am • Pan Am 3 4
Presented by: Jack Patton, AIA, LEED AP, RDG Planning & Design; Nathan Harris, RDG Planning & Design
CEUs: .1

Who, me? I want to run the facility, not design it! As an owner, manager, or operator, your input, guidance, and leadership are critical to the successful programming and design of your building. With your distinct knowledge, you hold the most important keys to the design solution, so learn how and when to apply your talents in creating a new or renovated recreation facility.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the critical importance of your role in design and your important position on the team.
  • Realize the leadership required from you to change your facility design from so-so to wonderful!

Facility Tours, Day 2

11:00 am-4:00 pm • Off Site

Attendees will tour University of Miami-Herbert Wellness Center and Florida International University.

Registration

8:30 am-9:30 am • Mezzanine Foyer

Stop by the NIRSA registration desk to pick up your name badge.


Preconference Facility Tours, presented by CORE Health and Fitness

9:30 am-5:30 pm • Off Site

Presented by CORE Health and Fitness, attendees will tour Barry University, UHealth Fitness and Wellness Center, and Marlins Park. Lunch will be included and transportation will depart from and return to the host hotel.

Registration

8:00 am-9:15 am • Mezzanine Foyer

Stop by the NIRSA registration desk to pick up your name badge.


Welcome & Keynote, presented by Matrix

9:15 am-10:30 am • Pan Am 1 2
Presented by: Arash Izadi

Arash has committed his career to the development of sport and recreation facilities that promote student learning and well-being. His passion for the success of collegiate students drives innovative designs of recreation centers across California and Texas. Arash guides clients, students and athletes through the planning, programming and design process to create sustainable and award-winning sport and recreation facilities, while his technical expertise has gained him recognition as an industry leader.


Rec-Connect: Maximize student well-being through campus culture, built spaces and integrated programming

10:45 am-11:45 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Marti Tomlin, University of Richmond; Heather Sadowski, University of Richmond; Jim Kovach, VMDO Architects
CEUs: .1

Facilities at higher education institutions are fundamentally shifting in how they are planned, designed, and used by university communities. Campuses are increasingly de-siloing departments in order to prioritize programmatic overlaps, centralize service and resource offerings, and reach as many students as possible with a renewed focus on wellbeing. With the goal to promote student success through the fusion of recreation and well-being offerings, the University of Richmond’s Well-Being Center promotes connectivity between University Recreation, Health Promotion, Counseling and Psychological Center and Student Health to help students holistically learn how to manage their overall health, cope with stress and other life challenges during their time on campus. Through Rigorous planning and programming investigated investigation, University of Richmond is fostering an upstream approach to build foundational support for healthy habits and a sense of wellbeing on campus.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop and synthesize a facilities program that supports all aspects of student wellness including the mental, physical, emotional, nutritional, and spiritual elements that, together, support wellbeing.
  • Identify ways to maximize transparency and openness to help connect students with a diverse range of wellbeing programs and resources that support an upstream approach to health and wellness.
  • Leverage spatial adjacencies to create synergies between student recreation, student health, student counseling, and athletics.

Planning for Change: Master Planning and Design with Adaptation in Mind

10:45 am-11:45 am • Pan Am 3 4
Presented by: Kevin Armstrong, AIA, LEED AP, AIA, LEED AP, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture
CEUs: .1

How can we best serve campus recreation needs now, in 5 years, 10 years, and beyond? This interactive session will review how adaptability can be applied in master planning and real-world design applications to allow for a variety of programming options. We will explore these considerations with three separate scenarios: first in recreation master planning, second with a renovation/addition project, and third a new indoor fieldhouse facility constructed in partnership with a community. Using this foundation, we’ll brainstorm about the role of flexible design in recreation programming, new ideas for traditional recreation spaces, and possibilities for the future. Whether you’re involved in small or large spaces or indoor or outdoor facilities, don’t miss this one-of-a-kind session!

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize how to make current, traditional recreation spaces more multi-functional to increase programming and diversify offerings on campus while mitigating the cost of building more infrastructure.
  • Understand how to weave recreation master planning into a broader campus master plan to garner approval and support from the community and bring new opportunities to fruition.
  • Analyze trends in recreation to determine how they can be applied in a multi-purpose manner with other compatible programming to meet current needs while allowing for future adaptations.

Facility Tours, Day 1–presented by Technogym

noon-6:00 pm • Off Site

Presented by Technogym, attendees will tour Florida Atlantic University (Recreation and Fitness Center and FAU Stadium) and Nova Southeastern University.

Interval Training (Early Morning Workout)

7:00 am-7:45 am • Pan Am 1 2 Terrace
Presented by: Lauren Davis, Columbus State University

A 45 minute workout of low-to high-intensity workouts interspersed with rest or relief periods. Join us prior to a full day of sessions so your mind is clear and ready to take on the Facilities Institute with flying colors.


Healthy Buildings, Happy Occupants: Improving the Wellbeing of Both

8:30 am-9:30 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Josh Jacobs, LEED AP, UL; Jim Stalford, Mondo America Inc.
CEUs: .1

This session will help architects, designers, and facility directors deepen their understanding of the impact of indoor air pollution on human health. Attendees will learn strategies for creating healthy environments, as well as explore the cost and financial benefits associated with sustainable design and product selection. This session will also identify helpful resources that aid in designing and maintaining a recreational space with a healthy indoor environment.

Core Competencies: Facility Management/Planning/Design, Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives:

  • Articulate the difference between low volatile organic compound (VOC) emission and low VOC content.
  • Identify sources of indoor air pollutants and their impact on human health.
  • Realize the importance of sustainability and transparency for making smarter product selection decisions.

That Coulda Been Me: Enacting Your EAP and Supporting Your Team During an Emergency

8:30 am-9:30 am • Constellation
Presented by: Ross Rodriguez, RCRSP, The University of Texas at Austin Recreational Sports; Erin Wells, The University of Texas at Austin
CEUs: .1

Following the real-life implementation of an Emergency Action Plan (EAP), this program aims to help answer the question of “Would I be ready if it happened to me?” This presentation will focus on the importance of teamwork to enact a successful EAP and discuss how the situation doesn’t end once the scene is declared safe by Emergency Response personnel.

Core Competencies: Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the necessity of a thorough EAP and teaching it to all levels of staff.
  • Compare the steps taken in the aftermath of an incident at another institution to the protocols in place on your campus.
  • Access available resources in the event of a similar situation on your campus.

Coffee Break

9:30 am-9:45 am • Foyer outside of the meeting rooms

Take a quick break between sessions to grab a cup of joe!


Wellbeing Roundtable

9:45 am-10:45 am • Pan Am 1 2
Presented by: Marti Tomlin, University of Richmond

During this 75-minute Wellbeing Roundtable, attendees will have an opportunity to interact with other campus rec professionals and discuss today’s hot topics in wellbeing. It will be a time to join together and discuss solutions to common issues seen within this area.


Well, Well, Well: A New Perspective on Facility Design Using the WELL Building Standard

11:00 am-noon • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Gavin Myers, AIA, NCARB, Hughes Group Architects; Lynn Reda, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, IIDA, Hughes Group Architects
CEUs: .1

The WELL Building Standard is at the forefront of sustainable design standards. Unlike LEED, Green Globes, and other sustainable design standards, the WELL Building Standard focuses entirely on how the built environment improves the health and wellness of its occupants. WELL applies scientific research to the design of facilities in respect to seven designated concepts: air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort, and mind. A dynamic and prescriptive rating system, WELL can help elevate your facility and its occupants to the next level.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management/Planning/Design, Business Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize how the WELL Building Standard aligns with fitness, recreation, and wellness facilities.
  • Identify the differences and synergies between the Well Building Standard and LEED.
  • Show the impacts the WELL Building Standard will have on your facility project not only during planning and construction, but also operationally.

Do You Need a Risk Management Committee?

11:00 am-noon • Constellation
Presented by: Michelle Fitzgerald, University of Central Florida; Derek Lower, Florida Polytechnic University
CEUs: .1

Risk Management is a focal point for all recreation professionals and programs. Recreation Administrators mandate procedures and create policies to manage risk, but what goes into this thought process and what results are they producing? Oftentimes, student employees are being asked to enforce policies and procedures, but are they being engaged in the process and receiving an explanation of the “why” behind Risk Management? Students should be aware of their role in managing risk. In this presentation, attendees will hear about the best practices of the University of Central Florida’s Recreation and Wellness Center and how students are taking an active approach in the development, implementation and evaluation of Risk Management policies and procedures. Attendees will be given information and tools to take back with them to their facilities and create their own Risk Management Committees.

Core Competencies: Programming, Personal & Professional Qualities, Legal Liability & Risk Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Assess the need for a risk management committee at your institution and learn ways to organize and implement a risk management committee.
  • Define the role student employees play in keeping your facility safe and discover ways to implement Risk Management training and development for them.
  • Implement an audit system for both full time and student employees which includes specific training and certification completions needed for each job responsibility.

Networking Luncheon & Expo

noon-2:30 pm • Pan Am 3 4

Let the conversations continue over lunch at the Networking Social & Expo Luncheon! Attendees and Vendors can enjoy a buffet lunch while networking and checking out the latest and greatest products.


Facility Roundtable

2:30 pm-3:45 pm • Pan Am 1 2
Presented by: Lashica Thomas, Columbus State University

During this 75-minute Facility Roundtable, attendees will have an opportunity to interact with other campus rec professionals and discuss today’s hot topics in facilities. It will be a time to join together and discuss solutions to common issues seen within this area.


A Blueprint for Student Health and Wellness Facilities

4:00 pm-5:00 pm • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Colleen McKenna, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP; Roland Lemke, AIA, LEED AP
CEUs: .1

The focus on health and wellbeing can vary dramatically from one institution to another. This presentation will explore the benefits and potential hurdles of addressing the needs of student and employee wellness programs. Operational paradigms, design fundamentals, environmental factors, and project examples will illustrate the many ways to address these growing needs.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine different definitions of health and wellness on college campuses.
  • Become familiar with the operational, design, and environmental factors within the built environment that influence behavior and outcomes.
  • Study several examples of integrated health and wellness models on college campuses.

The Physicality of Working in Facilities

4:00 pm-5:00 pm • Constellation
Presented by: Lashica Thomas, Columbus State University
CEUs: .1

Working in facilities is so much more than opening a building and getting staff in place. Being the “building person” may include knowing the location of the breaker boxes, operating all timers inside and outside the facility, managing the replacement of furniture, etc. There are so many things that come along with being responsible for the building. This session will focus on how others are staying up-to-date on best practices for managing facilities.

Core Competencies: Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify several options for training techniques regarding the physical operations of your facility.
  • Understand your role in the facilities arena.
  • Gain knowledge on processes that will help to facilitate daily operations.

Facilities Mixer, presented by PLAE

5:00 pm-6:30 pm • River’s End Patio

Immediately following the ed sessions, please plan to join fellow peers and colleagues for appetizers and beverages at the 2018 Facilities Mixer, presented by PLAE. This fantastic networking opportunity will be held in River’s End Patio.

Small Projects, Big Impact: Improving Facilities without Major Renovations

8:30 am-9:30 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Ken Wolters, CENTERS LLC at UMSL; Bob Holub, CENTERS LLC at Marshall University
CEUs: .1

Come and learn how even small projects can provide a big impact in your facility and on your campus. This presentation will focus on examples of facility improvement-related projects with budgets mostly ranging below $50,000. While new projects and major renovations are critical to long- term success, smaller-scale projects can also be vital in meeting campus-specific needs at a more attainable price tag. Presenters will incorporate short and long-term planning, feasibility, justification, funding methods, overall need/impact of projects, outcome of completed projects, and more for your facility planning consideration.

Core Competencies: Facility Management/Planning/Design, Business Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Create a short -term project plan for facility upgrades.
  • Define the differences between capital/R&R enhancements and general operational projects.
  • Assess needs versus wants in new and aging facilities.

Body, Mind, Spirit, and Facility: Connecting Active Design and Personal Wellbeing

8:30 am-9:30 am • Pan Am 3 4
Presented by: Dan Sullivan, AIA, LEED BD+C, Hastings+Chivetta Architects; Preston Scott, AIA, LEED BD+C, Hastings+Chivetta Architects
CEUs: .1

How can your recreation facility encourage students, faculty, and staff to work out in the gym, gather with friends to study, and foster a healthy spirit while experiencing a building that challenges the definition of a “healthy building”? This session will focus on connecting the Seven Dimensions of Wellness (Physical, Emotional, Intellectual, Spiritual, Social, Environmental, and Occupational) between individuals and the physical building, whether that be an existing facility needing updates or a brand new facility.

Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory, Personal & Professional Qualities, Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Analyze how the seven dimensions of wellness can impact a physical building.
  • Understand how current architectural buzz words like “Active Design,” “Living Building,” and LEED and WELL rating systems can challenge patrons to renewed health and wellbeing.

Coffee Break

9:30 am-9:45 am • Foyer outside of the meeting rooms

Take a quick break between sessions to grab a cup of joe!


A Case Study: Design Considerations, Lessons Learned, Benefits, and Maintenance Protocols when Converting to Artificial Turf

9:45 am-10:45 am • California & China Clipper
Presented by: Jeremy Battjes, EdD, University of Arkansas; Kristin DeAngelo, University of Arkansas
CEUs: .1

The decision to convert natural playing surfaces to artificial turf is one that should receive considerable thought. The University of Arkansas recently converted nearly 9 acres to improve experiences for the student body. Attendees will learn about the project experience, programming benefits, maintenance and operations protocols, and the makes and misses that were associated with the project.

Core Competencies: Facility Management/Planning/Design, Business Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the programming benefits of artificial turf in the collegiate recreation environment.
  • Learn maintenance protocols and plans for operation of artificial turf.
  • Identify the essential architect and construction manager qualifications needed when selecting a design team.

Your Role on the Design Team

9:45 am-10:45 am • Pan Am 3 4
Presented by: Jack Patton, AIA, LEED AP, RDG Planning & Design; Nathan Harris, RDG Planning & Design
CEUs: .1

Who, me? I want to run the facility, not design it! As an owner, manager, or operator, your input, guidance, and leadership are critical to the successful programming and design of your building. With your distinct knowledge, you hold the most important keys to the design solution, so learn how and when to apply your talents in creating a new or renovated recreation facility.

Core Competencies: Programming, Facility Management/Planning/Design

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the critical importance of your role in design and your important position on the team.
  • Realize the leadership required from you to change your facility design from so-so to wonderful!

Facility Tours, Day 2

11:00 am-4:00 pm • Off Site

Attendees will tour University of Miami-Herbert Wellness Center and Florida International University.