educational sessions

schedule by day

educational sessions

This information is subject to change. If you have questions or concerns, please email education@nirsa.org.
Last updated: February 14, 2020.

4.0 NIRSA CEUs    Saturday, April 18: 8:00 am-noon    Room 127 A-C

Must have preregistered to attend.

Scott Flickinger, Director, Intramural Sports and Noyes Community Rec Center, Cornell University; Ashley Lax, Assistant Director of Competitive Sports, University of Wisconsin- Madison; Jacob Tingle, CRSS,EdD, Director of Sport Management, Trinity University

In this active and engaging preconference workshop, participants will learn important skills required to be a successful Championship Series volunteer—such as how to craft a successful volunteer application, and what skills and experiences make a quality volunteer. Additionally, by attending the session, participants will enhance transferable skills—such as effective communication and teamwork—that will serve them beyond the Championship Series. This workshop is open to and intended for all NIRSA professionals, including those from all areas of campus recreation such as marketing, facilities, aquatics, and assessment.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management • Business Management

Learning Objectives
  • Demonstrate strong communication skills to actively engage in required work team tasks.
  • Develop teamwork skills required to execute various duties vital to Series regional and national events.
  • Create a Series volunteer application using successful elements and strategies learned.

4.0 NIRSA CEUs    Saturday, April 18: 8:00 am-noon    Room 128 AB

Must have preregistered to attend.

April Lovett, Strategic Planning & Assessment Analyst- Health & Wellness Portfolio, Florida State University; Darryl Lovett, Associate Director, Florida State University; A’Naja Newsome, RCRSP, Assistant Director, Fitness & Wellness, University of South Florida

This preconference workshop will give participants a brief overview of the assessment process, then dive deep into strategies to create buy-in and start building a culture of assessment in your department. Participants will understand how self-determination theory plays an important role in building assessment competencies; how to create data-collection instruments that are practical, sensible, and actionable; and learn how to set measurable program area goals that feed into the larger departmental strategic plan. Participants will also discuss the ethics of data collection and reporting. Attendees will leave with deliverables that can be adapted to meet their own departmental needs.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Philosophy & Theory • Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • “Close the Loop” and utilize assessment data for decision making, program improvement, and strategic planning.
  • Identify at least one basic program goal, one program advancement goal, and one student learning outcome for your program areas.
  • Articulate how assessment can be made practical, sensible, and actionable in your department.

4.0 NIRSA CEUs    Saturday, April 18: 8:00 am-noon    Room 228 AB

Must have preregistered to attend.

Christopher Crume, Denison University; Mila Padgett, Director, Campus Recreation and Wellness, University of South Carolina Aiken; Alicia Rossow, RCRSP, Director of Wellness, Florida Southern College

If you’re looking for help starting up a brand new program or looking for ideas to get your small program going, this is the session for you. Resources and discussions about starting programs will be the main elements of this morning session.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Philosophy & Theory • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Identify key elements in implementing a campus recreation program.
  • Learn how to develop knowledge and skills for operating a program.
  • Develop key relationships on campus to maximize your program.

3.5 NIRSA CEUs    Saturday, April 18: 1:00 pm-4:30 pm    Room 128 AB

Must have preregistered to attend.

Allie Bogard, RCRSP, Coordinator of Clubs, Intramurals, & Camps, Montana State University; Erin Patchett, CRSS,RCRSP, Director, Administration and Assessment, Colorado State University-Fort Collins; Zack Sephton, Coordinator, Facilities & Operations, Queens University; Andrea Snead, Assistant Director, Recreation & Wellness Center, University of Central Florida

This presentation will guide you through activities, discussion, and Q&A sessions while providing information to help you implement Safe Zone training on your campuses to create a healthy and welcoming work environment for LGBTQ+ individuals within your recreation department whether they are employees, participants, or visitors!

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Human Resources Management • Personal & Professional Qualities • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Create your own Safe Zone training for your campus recreation and wellbeing programs.
  • Articulate to your decision makers the benefits of creating an LGBTQ+-inclusive environment in your recreation and wellbeing programs.
  • Engage in effective conversations within your departments to ensure you are acting appropriately as an ally for the benefit of your stakeholders.

3.5 NIRSA CEUs    Saturday, April 18: 1:00 pm-4:30 pm    Room 228 AB

Coordinated by NIRSA Small Programs Advisory Council. Must have preregistered to attend.

Christopher Crume, Denison University; Mila Padgett, Director, Campus Recreation and Wellness, University of South Carolina Aiken; Alicia Rossow, RCRSP, Director of Wellness, Florida Southern College

Now that your program is up and running, learn how to make strategic partnerships and to use health and wellbeing to begin the larger conversations on your campus. This session will focus on tools and strategies to position your department on your campus.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Personal & Professional Qualities • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Identify ways to enhance support and growth of campus recreation programming on campus through various research and assessment-based resources and tactics.
  • Determine what constitutes a healthy program and how you can communicate that message.
  • Develop strategies to provide growth for programs with less resources.

   Saturday, April 18: 1:00 pm-4:30 pm    Room 127 A-C

Sean Graninger, University of Oregon; Gabrielle Sokol, Assistant Director, Intramural Sports & Sport Clubs, University of Mississippi

This program is an introduction to Unified Sports; it’s a workshop on how to implement a Unified Sports program on campus. There will be an in-depth discussion about creating, facilitating, and building a program at specific universities as well as discussion about contributing to state games and outside opportunities. The program will address how inclusive programming in sport can impact a campus community and how to program beyond sports for the universities looking to expand. This preconference program is for students and professionals who are passionate about expanding their knowledge of inclusive programming.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Learning Objectives
  • Understand the concept and impact of Unified Sports and collegiate recreation programs.
  • Learn how to apply the appropriate methods when working with Special Olympics, Unified Sports, and Special Olympics athletes.
  • Identify the best way to develop an effective Unified Sports program at their institution.

7.0 NIRSA CEUs    Saturday, April 18: 8:00 am-4:00 pm    Room 223

Must have preregistered to attend

David Bowles, CRSS, Interim Assoc. VP for Student Affairs, University of Florida; Maureen McGonagle, CRSS, Director, CENTERS, LLC At DePaul University; Eric Nickel, CRSS, Director of University Recreation, James Madison University

There are many competencies to master in order to be considered for a director position. Participating in this workshop will introduce you to needed competencies, help you evaluate your skill set, help you create a plan for mastering needed competencies, and support the development of a mentoring network to help you move ahead. Focused discussions will be held on topics such as organizational culture, communication, political positioning, relationship building, and executive leadership.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Describe at least three competencies necessary for success in a department leadership role.
  • Identify at least two goals to prepare yourself for a department leadership role.
  • Identify at least two learning points that will affect how you do your future work.

6.0 NIRSA CEUs    Saturday, April 18: 9:00 am-3:00 pm    Room 124 AB

Coordinated by NIRSA Student Professional Development Committee. Must have preregistered to attend.

Leigh Fouts, Fitness and Wellness Coordinator, Georgia Southern University-Armstrong Campus

The goal of this full-day workshop is to inspire NIRSA student members to continue learning about NIRSA and the collegiate recreation profession as well as to enhance their self-awareness through motivational interactions with their peers and with professionals. During this workshop, attendees can expect to explore various leadership topics, the values of the Association, and how to build a strong network within the field.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Explain the history of NIRSA.
  • Identify future NIRSA involvement opportunities that will support their skill development and career goals.
  • Incorporate NIRSA values into their daily professional lives.

4.0 NIRSA CEUs    Saturday, April 18: 8:00 am-4:00 pm    Room 224 A

Must have preregistered to attend.

Elizabeth Greenlee, Asst Dir of Recreation – Wellness/Fitness, Radford University; Tiffany Lomax, Associate Director of Wellness, Recreation and Campus Events, Delaware State University; Shelbi Long, Director of Campus Recreation, Sonoma State University; Stefani Plummer, Director-Rec Center, California Baptist University

Let’s MOVE! As women we are on the move, but let’s break it down. What’s your Motivation (What’s your “why” behind your passion?), Ownership (Know your leadership style and how it impacts others), Victories (What are they? Celebrate them! How do we “brag”?) and Encouragement (Let’s be there for ourselves and others). Lunch will include time for small group talks with topics pre-selected by attendees. Join us for an inspirational time of intentional and interactive talks. Come ready to participate, build connections, and be refreshed!

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Identify your own personal leadership style and the impact it has on others.
  • Identify a resource or relationship to enhance professional development and identify at least one woman with whom you would like to build a relationship with after the workshop.
  • Integrate positive practices offered by the MOVE strategy into your personal leadership style, which will enable you to more effectively advocate for yourself.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 224 A

Melanie Rossetti, Coordinator, Competitive Sports & Youth Programs, Washington State University; Joanne Greene, Programming Director, Washington State University

Are you as inclusive in your programming as you think you are? Are you thinking outside the box to include all members of your campus community? Come to this session on inclusive vs. adaptive programming to learn about what you can do to make a better atmosphere for your student and campus populations. Learn new ideas for how to collaborate and foster diverse programming. Identify ways to combat barriers on your campus.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming • Facility Management, Planning & Design

Learning Objectives
  • Differentiate between adaptive and inclusive recreation.
  • Identify ways to incorporate adaptive programming at your institution.
  • List barriers at your school to participation in recreation programming.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 126 A-C

Sue Lowley, Director of Adventure Programs, Stanford University

What impact have affinity-based programs had in promoting access and participation in adventure-based activities for people with marginalized identities? What are some of the challenges of supporting this type of programming in campus recreation departments? This session will explore issues surrounding affinity-based programs and examine the potential of these types of programs to transform the “intentional non-user” into an “intentional user.”

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Define what a single identity space is and be able to list the positive impacts of singe identity spaces on participants.
  • Describe the barriers to participation experienced by individuals with marginalized identities when it comes to adventure-based activities as well as how affinity spaces help dismantle those barriers.
  • Describe three ways you can support affinity spaces within your campus recreation program.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 127 A-C

Kurt Schooley, RCRSP, Assistant Director- Satellite & Outdoor Facilities, The Ohio State University; David DeAngelo, CRSS, Senior Associate Director of Facilities, The Ohio State University; Matt Hogg, Regional Vice President of Education and Sales, Brock International, Brock International

Do you have any artificial turf fields on your campus? Thinking of adding any? This session will discuss artificial turf field safety including the Head Injury Criterion Test and why you should know what it is before your next turf field installation or renovation.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Facility Management, Planning & Design • Legal Liabilities & Risk Management

Learning Objectives
  • Understand the Head Injury Criterion Test and why it is important.
  • Identify at least two maintenance practices to increase the playability and safety of your artificial turf field.
  • Recognize what HIC and GMAX ratings are acceptable for an artificial turf field and how the addition of a pad can affect these ratings.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 125 AB

Mason Bagley, Facility Operations, University of Toledo; Nancy Burhans, Assistant Director, University of Toledo; Cameron Pendergraph, Coordinator, Events and Facility Operations, University of Toledo

You cannot turn on the nightly news without seeing a report of a violent intruder incident in the United States or internationally. Since these instances have unfortunately become a social norm, the University of Toledo staff enhanced their preparedness by collaborating with the campus police department on a realistic violent intruder simulation. Join the University of Toledo’s representatives to see if your team is ready to avenge a violent intruder villain.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Legal Liabilities & Risk Management • Facility Management, Planning & Design

Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the importance of campus partnerships to enhance university-wide trainings.
  • Develop a strategic plan to enhance your employees’ ability to react to emergency situations as both an employee and as a bystander.
  • Be able to recognize barriers and challenges in implementing a violent intruder training.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 128 AB

Amanda Alpert, Associate Director of Campus Recreation – Programs, University of Mississippi; Dan Ekonen, Director, Unified Sports Initiatives, Special Olympics Michigan; Scott George, Manager, Unified Champion Schools: University Engagement, Special Olympics

Become a part of the Special Olympics Unified Sports movement! Learn what exactly Unified Sports are as well as about best practices for implementing a program using the three component model of Unified Champion Schools. Discover stories and data that illustrate just why inclusion is so important for a campus and its students. Hear firsthand from staff who have administered Special Olympics programs as well as from a student and Special Olympics athlete pair. You will be sure to take what you learn and get ready to start your college down the path of becoming a Unified Champion School!

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Identify and explain the three components of a Special Olympics Unified Champion School at the college level.
  • Describe why having an environment of meaningful inclusion is important and vital to student success.
  • Connect with your Special Olympics State Program office to begin a successful partnership that brings Special Olympics Unified Sports programs to your campus.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 125 AB

Darrell Fedchak, Outdoor Adventure Coordinator, Clayton State University

Students today spend less time outdoors than any generation before them. Studies have shown that increasing the amount of time spent outside can help improve focus, lower stress and anxiety, and can result in increased performance in classes and on tests. This session explores the benefits of an outdoor program at the collegiate level for both the student and the university. We will also cover how to enhance your existing outdoor program to meet with your institution’s goals, how to implement a new outdoor program if your university does not already have one, and give examples of programs you can use on your campus.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Understand the challenges students face in today’s society and how a connection to the outdoors can benefit them.
  • Design and implement new programs on your campus to increase the opportunities for students to experience the outdoors.
  • Collaborate with other campus departments to provide programming that students find relevant and beneficial.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 223

Presented by NIRSA Board of Directors

David Davenport, Director & Chief Diversity Officer, Austin Peay State University; Cara Lucia, PhD, Associate Professor, Elon University

Are you thinking about serving on a NIRSA board one day? Are you wondering what volunteer experience will expand your strategic thinking? Come to this session to learn more about serving on the Board of Directors for NIRSA, the NIRSA Services Corporation, and the NIRSA Foundation. A review of the competencies needed to serve in these roles, opportunities to develop those competencies, and steps for applying for positions will be covered. Whether you’re thinking about serving soon or in a few years, attend this session to learn more about opportunities for professional growth.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Gain a better understanding of the process for applying for some of NIRSA’s key leadership positions.
  • Learn about the challenges and rewards of service in a variety of NIRSA leadership positions.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 121 A-C

Christin Everson, Assistant Director of UREC, Marketing & Events, Seattle University; Kirsten Schumacher, Assistant Director of UREC, Competitive Sports, Seattle University

Now more than ever, there is immense pressure on our students to meet society’s requirement of specific body image ideals. Many campuses are responding to this societal pressure by creating positive body image campaigns to inspire their communities. In this presentation, we’ll break down the components of a successful positive body image campaign and discuss best practices to ensure your campaign meets your community’s needs.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the benefits of a positive body image campaign.
  • Identify multiple elements of a campaign, including informal and formal programming and branding elements.
  • Identify resources to support a successful and meaningful campaign.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 224 A

Featured presentation from Region V

Raymond Schmidt, Marketing and Promotions Coordinator, Iowa State University

Your Rec. Your Way. Those short, four words are defining what it means to participate in one of Iowa State Recreation Services program areas or activities. Over the last few months this brand campaign can be seen and felt through print and digital media, the website, environmental graphics, social media, and most importantly, the Recreation Services Staff. The campaign promotes individuality and reflects the goal of appealing to a diverse population with a wide range of recreational backgrounds. There is something for everyone at Recreation Services, however you play, it is Your Rec, Your Way.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Business Management • Facility Management, Planning, Design

Learning Objectives
  • Plan, design, and implement a brand campaign.
  • Examine Gen-Z and some of the desires and expectations they have for a collegiate Rec Center.
  • Recognize different ways a brand can be applied and the importance of promotion through unification.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 228 AB

Jarrell Garcia, Assistant Director for Operations, University of California-Santa Barbara; Diana Torres, University of California-Santa Barbara

Professionalism, ownership, critical thinking—these are just a few of many values we as supervisors wish to instill in our staff. This session will look at how establishing a student staff code of conduct creates a “filtering effect,” which produces quality staff and a desired culture within our program areas. This presentation will go beyond simply sharing a staffing code of conduct from an employee manual/handbook and will instead dive into ingraining desired values into the staffing culture. From hiring and training to disciplining and promoting, the concepts reviewed in this presentation will make you rethink how we go about implementing our desired cultures. The key to breaking the code may lie in us handing it over to our students.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Acknowledge the importance of establishing a code of conduct for program values and expectations.
  • Describe the impact an established code of conduct has on the environment of a program area and department.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 128 AB

Alex Lee, Coordinator Indoor Operations and Camps, Central Washington University

Given the rising costs of operating a recreation department, finding ways to bring in extra revenue has become a top priority. Camp programs are a great way to bring in the extra revenue without dipping into your students’ pockets. In this program, you will learn about branding a camp to be recognizable in your community, strategies to communicate a children’s camp to both on- and off-campus entities, and implementing an effective communications plan. You will also learn about the tremendous growth of Camp C-Woo.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming • Business Management

Learning Objectives
  • Brand a camp program to be recognizable in the community.
  • Develop strategies to communicate a children’s camp to on- and off-campus entities.
  • Create and implement an effective communications plan.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 127 A-C

Anita Moran, Principal, Office of Moran Architects; Jeff Choyce, Principal, BRW Architects

Collegiate recreation facilities are intended for decades of use. Some of the most important parts of a building or field design is the location and climatic impacts. With evidence of—and growing concern about—climate change, how do you design for an uncertain future? And what are measures that you can take to preserve our current climate?

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Facility Management, Planning & Design • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Recall six facts regarding climate change.
  • Incorporate new strategies into your new project that might offer long-term flexibility and that address climate change.
  • Identify practices that your department can adopt to improve your impact on the environment.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 228 AB

Steve Kinsey, Senior Assistant Director, Intramural and Club Sports, Sam Houston State University; Sammy Axley, CRSS, RCRSP, Director of Campus Recreation, University At Albany; Matthew Boyer, CRSS, Director of University Recreation, Central Washington University

There are a number of existing presentations that discuss how to develop your professional documents, highlight your skills, and interview to the best of your ability. However, few of these presentations, discuss how to persist through a search process that can often take months or, potentially, even years. The reasons for these kinds of search times vary and can include looking only in a certain region, having a list of non-negotiables for the position you hope to hold, and—perhaps most importantly—trying to find a fit for your personality and style. At the end of the day, it’s often the ability to persist, rather than interview well, that results in you accomplishing your career goals. This presentation will take you through the seven key elements of persistence and how each of them can be used to secure the career move of your dreams.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Be able to articulate the importance of persistence in securing the right fit for your chosen career path.
  • Identify and know how to implement the personal and professional traits necessary to persist through an extended employment search.
  • Identify diverse employment opportunities through a broadened search that extends beyond NIRSA.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 131 A-C

George Brown, PhD,RCRSP, CRSS, Assistant Vice Provost and Director of University Recreation and Wellness, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; Rahul Rajan, Facilities & Risk Management Coordinator, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

The landscape for creative and sustainable staff practices for emerging student leaders in collegiate recreation is evolving with higher education mandates for efficient and sustainable operations. This presentation will examine current and future trends with respect to graduate assistantships, internships, and other professional staff opportunities.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Human Resources Management • Philosophy & Theory • Business Management

Learning Objectives
  • Identify the varying careers paths available to those interested in the field of collegiate recreation.
  • Provide examples of sustainable funding options for staff collegiate recreation departments.
  • Articulate future trends in staffing collegiate recreation programs and exhibit an appreciation for determining what options are more effective for your given institution and department.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 121 A-C

Tori Lord, Assistant Director for Fitness, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Sophie Rattray, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Matt Shilling, GA for Informal Recreation and Student Development, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

As higher education professionals, we prepare for all kinds of emergency situations. Most of the time, we run through the procedures and rehearse them to the best of our abilities—but how do we handle or face the aftermath when a real tragedy actually strikes campus? On April 30, 2019, UNC Charlotte was faced with a real shooter in an event not unlike the routine trainings we all go through every year. What active shooter or A.L.I.C.E training didn’t prepare us for is how we were going to feel or how we were going to be impacted as individuals, as student employee supervisors, and as a campus community by the incident. Hear the story of campus recreation professionals who were involved in a lockdown in the gym the night of the shooting. They will discuss the experience and how they came to face the days that followed.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Understand how a tragedy on campus impacts each person in the campus community in different ways and understand that individuals may require different methods to recover.
  • Understand the importance of being a support system and resource for the community while also, as an individual, being able to feel what you are feeling.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 127 A-C

Melanie Stawkey, Supervisor of Intramurals, Club Sports, and Adventure Programming, Wayne State University; David Mann, Coordinator, Intramural Sports and Youth Camps, University of Toledo

The presenters will introduce new and diverse ways to expand and collaborate programs across adventure and intramural departments using a climbing wall and ropes course. This program will also review the marketing strategies, organization, structure, and rules of Wayne State University’s leagues and competitions. Using intramural participant data and the growth of Wayne State’s program as a guide, the presenters will discuss the benefits to both the adventure and intramural departments and the increasing diversity of intramural participants as a result of combining programs.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Demonstrate non-traditional methods to increase intramural participation.
  • Identify the benefits of incorporating climbing activities into intramurals.
  • Describe multiple ways to incorporate climbing activities into your intramural sports program.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 121 A-C

Joshua Downing, Director of Recreation & Wellness, Butler University

This presentation details Butler University’s intentional efforts to advance student wellbeing and the student experience. Butler’s “BU Be Well” model, developed through a strategic and collaborative campus-wide approach, is comprised of eight dimensions that provide the framework for a transformative student experience through holistic wellbeing. BU Be Well fosters a positive environment for student learning and development both inside and outside of the classroom. Co-author: Bridget Yuhas, Director of Student Affairs Assessment & Planning, Butler University

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Programming • Philosophy & Theory • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Define how your department can work and collaborate with campus stakeholders to form a transformative and holistic approach to student wellbeing.
  • Be able to describe three to four ways that collaboration with campus stakeholders can enhance the student experience.
  • Develop a marketing and branding strategy that supports a culture of wellbeing.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 124 AB

Jenny Larson, Associate Director for Recreation Programs and Facilities, Elon University; Larry Mellinger, Director of Campus Recreation & Wellness, Elon University

One of the most significant services a recreation department offers to its students is the opportunity for employees to take on a formal leadership position that involves the supervision of peers. When provided with this opportunity, many student employees are excited; however, many also experience anxiety and doubt about their ability to be effective in such a position. This session will provide tips and strategies on how to develop and implement a centralized, cohort-based student employee leadership training that is grounded in theory and provides both hard and soft skill development.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Develop strategies for how to implement the Social Change Model or other leadership theories into a student employee leadership training curriculum.
  • Describe the benefits and challenges associated with a centralized student employee leadership training program.
  • Identify assessment measures to effectively measure learning.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 224 A

Featured presentation from Region VI

Kaycee Tanioka, Intramural Sports and Sport Clubs Coordinator, California State Polytechnic University- Pomona; Agon Abazi, Competitive Sports Coordinator, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Being an Intramural Sports Official is tough—especially being a female Official! For female officials, it can be challenging to experience differential treatment and targeting, change norms and expectations, find leadership opportunities and more. This session will explore initiatives that benefit all officials, but especially support female officials.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Articulate the challenges that female Officials face in Intramural Sports
  • Identify at least 3 new strategies to create an Intramural Sports environment that supports female Officials

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 224 A

Jim Fitzsimmons, Director, University of Nevada-Reno; Sheena Harvey, Associate Director, University of Nevada-Reno

Fitness and sport are significant cultural identifiers and represent a largely unappreciated area for the advancement of diversity, inclusion, and equity on many campuses. Is your facility and program built around the North American construct of fitness and sport? If so, you’re missing an amazing opportunity to serve a larger portion of your campus.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Facility Management, Planning & Design • Philosophy & Theory • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Explore strategies to progress the idea of fitness and sport as important cultural identifiers unifying a diverse community under the overall umbrella of fitness and sport.
  • Describe how fitness and sport offers access to unique and holistic learning environments to affirm diversity.
  • Construct an ethnographic model of fitness and sport culture at your institution.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 127 A-C

A’Naja Newsome, RCRSP, Assistant Director, Fitness & Wellness, University of South Florida; April Lovett, Strategic Planning & Assessment Analyst- Health & Wellness Portfolio, Florida State University; Darryl Lovett, Associate Director, Florida State University

Collegiate recreation programs and facilities improve student wellbeing, academic success, and career readiness. However, many professionals lack the skills, tools, and confidence to communicate the impact of recreation to the higher education experience. In this session, you will learn how effectively using data can be powerful. You will receive practical and tangible tools that will make assessment more accessible for your department.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Identify at least two ways to develop competencies in assessment for your department.
  • Describe value of using assessment data for decision making, process improvement, and strategic planning.
  • Articluate how assessment can be made practical, sensible, and actionable in your department.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 124 AB

Michael Giles, CRSS, Director, Iowa State University; Amy Kurr; Jason Vlastaras, Associate Director of Student Success, Iowa State University

Addressing equity and inclusion is both a head and a heart issue. Follow Iowa State’s multi-year journey to discover how data and passion combined to create a model for change. Over the course of four years, Iowa State Recreation Services partnered with students and academics to conduct two surveys on gender inequity in weight training facilities. The resulting conversations and changes have had lasting ramifications and impacts well beyond the scope of the weight room. Learn how you can take a similar data-driven and person-minded approach to make your recreation facilities more welcoming and inclusive.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Facility Management, Planning & Design • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Recognize importance of using data to drive equity and inclusion initiatives.
  • Identify the leadership components essential to creating a culture of change.
  • Identify several practical approaches to implementing inclusive initiatives.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 224 A

Todd Misener, PhD, Chief Wellness Officer, Oklahoma State University

Benjamin Franklin once said that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” This quote has only become more meaningful over time. Identifying and preventing factors that negatively affect a student’s success in college and life is the hallmark of student affairs professionals in higher education. In the same way that a sedentary lifestyle is associated with an increased risk for heart disease, disengagement is associated with poor academic and health outcomes. This presentation will provide a detailed overview of processes and outcomes from a multi-year study of factors associated with student success. That study is being used to prevent student attrition and bolster retention, GPA, and overall student engagement on campus.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Research & Evaluation • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the links between resilience, wellbeing, and student engagement.
  • Describe achievable engagement and outreach strategies you can launch on your campus.
  • Describe how to leverage data to build collaborations that support student wellbeing and retention efforts.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 121 A-C

Aaron Hobson, Associate Director of Facility Operations, University of Florida; David Bowles, CRSS, Interim Assoc. VP for Student Affairs, University of Florida; Marty Dempsey, Associate Director For Facility Operations, University of Florida

Is your department’s budget telling you where your money will go or merely where the money went? Learn how your department can be more strategic in the long term with its financial practices. This presentation will provide keys to strategic financial planning processes including capital improvement plans, equipment replacement plans, and price indexing.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Facility Management, Planning & Design • Business Management • Legal Liabilities & Risk Management

Learning Objectives
  • Explain the difference between planning, budgeting, and forecasting and know how to apply each strategy to your budgeting processes.
  • Apply at least two new practices to better budget for capital improvement and equipment replacement plans.
  • Describe the various types of price indexing and how to apply them to your department’s budgeting practices.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 128 AB

Michael Medina, Director of Campus Life for Recreation, Quinnipiac University; Bhavin Parekh, Associate Director-Competitive Sports, University of Connecticut

As the National Federation of High Schools continues running ad campaigns to entice people to officiate, local officiating organizations are seeing a prime area of recruitment: intramural sport programs. Student employees are finding huge success crossing over from intramural referee to middle school, high school, and—in some cases—collegiate or professional referee. This presentation will allow attendees to find local officiating organizations near their campus and will discuss the benefits of a collaborative relationship when the solicitation “We need your refs!” comes.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Business Management

Learning Objectives
  • Collaborate with local officiating organizations and better train student employees in your intramural department.
  • Articulate three methods of assisting local officiating organizations.
  • Identify best practices for approaching your local officiating board.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 126 A-C

Benjamin Justice, Member Services Coordinator, The Ohio State University; Scott Holmes, Assistant Director, The Ohio State University

This session will take a deeper dive into what practical applications are being made in our work settings within collegiate recreation specifically focused on diversity and inclusion in the area of member services. What are we actually doing to emphasize the importance of inclusion? How can we take the resource guide developed by the NIRSA Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Commission and make positive changes in our day-to-day operations? We want to use this time to highlight ideas already in action, discuss challenges, and share ideas with colleagues.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Human Resources Management • Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Describe how you can utilize the resource guide introduced by the NIRSA Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Commission in your daily operations.
  • Develop new ideas regarding how you can enhance your focus on inclusive practices.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 124 AB

Christopher Morris, CRSS, Director of Campus Recreation, Florida State University; Michael Edwards, Senior Director of Campus Recreation, Georgia Institute of Technology; Tim Mertz, Sr. Director, Collegiate & Community Recreation, HealthFitness; Mila Padgett, Director, Campus Recreation and Wellness, University of South Carolina Aiken; Jennifer Speer, Senior Director, The University of Texas at Austin

How do you identify and assess an organization’s capacity to add new programs or opportunities that might result in a positive fiscal impact? How do we best balance offering “free with a student fee” programs and services with new and innovative programs that may include an additional charge? Do new offerings need to be net “profitable” to be successful? What are prime areas for new expansion in for-profit programs? Explore these questions and more at this session!

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Business Management • Research & Evaluation • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Assess your organization’s current financial health through a lens of increasing or decreasing capacity.
  • Identify multiple areas of potential financial growth for your current organization.
  • Identify numerous potential collaborative partners and target audiences for fiscal growth.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 228 AB

Lindsay Wigderson, Aquatics Coordinator, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Ashley Allen, Fitness Coordinator, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Many collegiate recreation departments have programs to help students develop skills for career readiness, including leadership. But what if you didn’t need to start from scratch to create your own program? Instead of recreating the wheel, we collaborated with our campus partners to utilize a sustainable leadership program and tailor it to our student employees. From implementation to assessment, we will discuss ways that attendees can collaborate with campus partners to provide a reputable leadership program for student employees.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Identify strategies to create and implement a student development and leadership program.
  • Determine campus partners and resources to tailor the leadership program to your departmental needs.
  • Connect NACE Competencies to student development and leadership programming.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 122 A-C

Featured presentation from Region II

Emily Dyer, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Corrine Pruett, Operations and Events Coordinator, West Virginia University

Participants will learn through a variety of ways including testimonials, group discussions and personal reflection on how to identify various stigmas, barriers, and actions preventing female leaders from being successful. They will leave with strategies and tools that they can implement into their own workplace to create a positive change.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Human Resources Management • Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Appreciate the importance and value of mentoring female leaders and fostering an environment conducive to their development.
  • Identify various stigma, barriers, and actions preventing female leaders from being successful.
  • Develop strategies to support and empower female leaders.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 131 A-C

Arianne Judy, Assistant Director of Sport Programs, University of Notre Dame; Benjamin Burnham, Associate Director, Facilities and Operations for Campus Recreation, Boise State University; Erin Patchett, CRSS,RCRSP, Director, Administration and Assessment, Colorado State University-Fort Collins

Despite a large investment of time (and money!) during the recruitment phase, many organizations spend very little time onboarding new professional staff. Being intentional with recruitment and onboarding can help new employees show up more authentically as well as help them find ways to be successful sooner in their experience. In this session, you will learn what two different institutions are doing to weave a culture of care, inclusion, and belonging into numerous early experiences a new employee has—from the recruitment and interview stage through the onboarding and integration stage.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Identify two new practices to incorporate into the interview process to enhance the experience for candidates.
  • Identify two new practices to incorporate into the onboarding process to support the success and belonging of your new employee.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 131 A-C

Mark Nemat, Student, Florida State University; Brittany Mueller, Florida State University

Do your intramural officials training techniques meet the learning styles of today’s students? Explore new tools and teaching methods that expand on traditional lecture-based presentations to make your trainings more interactive, relatable, and effective. From new technologies to effective group discussion models, you can promote student-centered learning that gives participants the foundation to become great officials. Join this interactive presentation to discuss the many options available for programs and budgets large and small.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Identify different teaching methods, and their pros and cons, as well as identify different training aides and how to incorporate them into sessions.
  • Create and implement an interactive training program.
  • Continuously educate (in-season quizzes, meetings, etc.) and evaluate effectiveness (feedback through post-training surveys).

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 131 A-C

Featured presentation from Region IV

Andrew Chadick, Senior Associate Director | Programs & Assessment, The University of Texas at San Antonio

Are you about to graduate and enter the “real world?” Maybe you’re a few years away but will still be one of the millions in the U.S. who will graduate with student loan debt. This session will discuss a key component of your overall well-being … your financial well-being! Come learn about student loans, credit cards, retirement and more!

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • State the difference between subsidized and unsubsidized student loans.
  • Recalll at least 3 of the 6 factors that impact an individual’s credit score.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 126 A-C

Todd Bowyer, RCRSP, Director of Campus Recreation, Roanoke College; Patricia Lynn, Assistant Director of Campus Recreation, Roanoke College

Campus partnerships, particularly at a small program, can expand the impact of a collegiate recreation department. Through reciprocal support with various departments, campus recreation can weave itself into the fabric of an institution and reach a greater number of students. In this session, we will explore the difference between coordination, cooperation, and collaboration; consider possible opportunities for campus partnerships; and discuss the advantages and challenges of these endeavors.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Articulate the difference between coordination, cooperation, and collaboration.
  • Identify at least five possible opportunities to partner with other departments on campus.
  • Describe at least three advantages and three challenges often encountered with campus partnerships.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 131 A-C

Michelle Leachman; Kyle Dean, Fitness Coordinator, Boise State University

This engaging and informative session will provide lived experiences of the effects of social media within the recreational environment. How do you approach difficult situations with consequential outcomes? How do you use social media to grow program areas? The presentation will address how to use policy and expectation signage without direct use of signs within facilities. The take aways from this presentation will impact the audience both personally and professionally.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Legal Liabilities & Risk Management • Personal & Professional Qualities • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Appreciate social media in the recreational setting. This will include both student staff uses, participant use and facility use.
  • Define the negative/harmful social media effects and implement a forward approach towards positive social media use.
  • Apply effective signage strategies.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 125 AB

Laurie Braden, CRSS, Executive Director, University Recreation, Louisiana State University; Paul Joran, HOK

As clients and users explore more functional, three-dimensional, and ground-base forms of fitness, a well-conceived and dedicated turf space has become critical to the modern recreation facility. That turf space’s success is dependent on much more than its size; there are several subtle aspects that contribute to its utilization and longevity. In this presentation, everything from vision to implementation will be discussed, giving attendees takeaways to influence their use of turf within their facilities.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Facility Management, Planning & Design • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Encourage program directors to think critically about how turf training areas can enhance their program offerings and facility performance.
  • Describe how turf areas can be specifically designed to match your programs goals and needs.
  • Communicate how maintenance and details of a turf space can increase its longevity and performance.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 131 A-C

Joe Schaffer, Assistant Director of Sport Programs, Oregon State University

Have you been told your club officer training is slow, boring, and ineffective? Are you looking for a new approach to club officer training? During this session, attendees will learn about a “flipped classroom” teaching concept that can be applied to your officer training. This will allow you to move the boring policy PowerPoints to a self-paced learning environment while making your in-person trainings engaging active learning environments. This concept can be applied to staff trainings as well.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Programming • Philosophy & Theory • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Explain what a flipped classroom is and how it can be applied to student trainings.
  • Incorporate online teaching methods into trainings.
  • Identify three active learning techniques.

1.5 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 128 AB

Brian Tran, GA for Fitness & Group Exercise, James Madison University

This active discussion and information session is about inclusive messaging around nutrition in the collegiate setting. With the overwhelming quantity of nutrition misinformation presented by social media influencers and television as well as other sources, it can become difficult to feel comfortable with your food choices or self image. This discussion is made for collegiate recreation professionals to eliminate the stigma that there are such things as bad or good foods. This session also promotes the idea that you can be truly healthy in a larger body.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Identify one to two new strategies for talking about food inclusively.
  • Identify one to two new ways to make decisions with food more contextually and less emotionally.
  • Recognize at least one non-inclusive food term that you currently use on a regular basis.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 124 AB

presented by NIRSA’s marketing partner, Riddle and Bloom

NIRSA’s exclusive marketing partner, Riddle and Bloom, conducts an annual survey to understand what makes college students tick- from health and wellness, to nutrition, to technology, to buying preference, and more. This panel will explore the driving influences among 18-24 year olds.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Business Management

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 122 A-C

Featured presentation from Region I

Jason Hess, Assistant Director for Intramural Sports, University of Maryland-College Park; Kurt Klier, CRSS, RCRSP, Assistant Director, University of Maryland-College Park

Don’t get caught behind the curve on concussion management! Come learn about the process of implementing a full removal and return to play protocol to protect your Club and Intramural Participants, as well as your department. This session will examine the process of implementing concussion management, including two full time Athletic Trainers (ATC), as well as provide an opportunity for discussion and sharing of strategies among attendees.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Legal Liabilities & Risk Management • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of concussion management in recreational sports programs.
  • Describe 3 “lessons learned” from the concussion management at the University of Maryland.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 223

Allie Bogard, RCRSP, Coordinator of Clubs, Intramurals, & Camps, Montana State University; Nicole LaRocque, Associate Director, Recreation Programs, University of Colorado Boulder; Lisa Lemler, Assistant Director – Programs, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; Victoria Lopez-Herrera, Senior Associate Director, The University of Texas at San Antonio; Jill Sala, National Account Manager, Affinity Groups, G Adventures

Picture 16 women in Costa Rica, jumping into waterfalls, paddling through rapids, hiking up the side of a volcano, and kayaking through dense vegetation- while exploring the intersection of their personal leadership journey and wellbeing. Sound exciting? Global University, hosted by G Adventures and AORE, partnered with NIRSA to offer an outdoor learning experience aimed at fostering a community of experts that support the industry. Come to this session to learn how participants translated the experience to their personal and professional life and be challenged to think of innovative ways you can support global programming development and enhance the professions of outdoor education and collegiate recreation through collaboration.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Personal & Professional Qualities • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Articulate the transformational impact of outdoor recreation and education experiences specific to wellbeing.
  • Identify existing opportunities that can be leveraged to address integrative wellbeing through outdoor adventure.
  • Recognize opportunities for collaboration on their respective campuses, which will enhance the student experience, and build a culture of wellbeing and success.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 223

Yvette Kell, CRSS, PhD, Director of Campus Recreation, CENTERS, LLC At University of Missouri-St Louis

This interactive session will provide attendees with an overview of how the Government Affairs Committee’s work relates to campus-level decision-making. Attendees will leave the session with an understanding of how the Government Affairs Committee Policy Matrix can be used on their campuses to guide conversations with campus partners and administration.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Legal Liabilities & Risk Management • Human Resources Management • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Discuss NIRSA’s position on recent and current policy topics relevant to higher education.
  • Be able to articulate the role of the Government Affairs Committee and understand how you can utilize it as a resource for legislation affecting your work.
  • Understand whether the policy matrix is a valuable resource to improve communication with administrators on your campus.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 224 A

Jeannette Stawski, Executive Director, AORE – Assoc. of Outdoor Recreation & Education; Lance Haynie, Associate Director for Programs, University of Georgia; Nicole LaRocque, Associate Director, Recreation Programs, University of Colorado Boulder

How are you contributing real results to retention? Are you addressing mental health and other wellbeing challenges at your campus? The secret is out: news feeds have been filled with research supporting the correlation between the positive health effects from being outside and the bottom line. Research is verifying what we’ve known intuitively is like the satisfaction of a perfectly toasted s’more. Outdoor recreation is a conduit to connectivity – the very essence of an individual’s wellness and belonging. Expanding outdoor programs to their full potential will further enable healthy individuals, communities, and campuses. Leaders on campuses recognize there is an opportunity for outdoor recreation to play a greater role in positive outcomes for students’ health and wellness. Learn how your department can set its compass on success in strategically designing, or for those with established programs in further leveraging, outdoor recreation and education.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Business Management • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Articulate how outdoor recreation supports campus health and wellbeing.
  • Explain the cost centers and returns on investment for outdoor recreation.
  • Describe the barriers to inclusivity and program/facility design that dissuade participation and engagement.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 128 AB

Sponsored by American Council on Exercise (ACE)

Anthony Wall, ACE-American Council on Exercise

Discover how health coaching and behavior-change programming are dramatically enriching recreation center offerings to students, equipping and emboldening them to adopt a more physically active way of life. And hear how rec center employees who train in delivering those programs become ideally equipped to pursue a fulfilling new career path among the growing numbers of certified health coaches.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Demonstrate how innovative recreation centers are using health coaching and behavior-change programming to provide students with more meaningful offerings.
  • Describe the benefits of developing students with behavior change coaching programming, and how such programming benefits both students and staff on and off campus.
  • Implement health coaching programming that equips students to take on careers in a red-hot field.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 228 AB

Cody Ballinger, Competitive Sport Coordinator, West Virginia University; Veronica Chevalier, Aquatics Program and Risk Management Coordinator, University of Notre Dame

Struggling to navigate rough waters? Looking for ways you can get everyone on board and all hands on deck? This program provides student staff, peer leaders, and young professionals with the lifesavers to manage all of the different professional relation”ships” of collegiate recreation. Whether it’s staying afloat during a tough conversation or coaching your crew through a storm, this mix of personal reflection and collaborative learning will help you stay anchored when the tides get tough. (Puns intended)

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Human Resources Management • Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Manage peer-to-peer relationships with tools to manage laterally.
  • Navigate tough conversations with tools to manage laterally, up, and down.
  • Coach others to effectively manage professional relationships through fostering their own.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 121 A-C

Nicole Olmeda, CRSS, Associate Director, The University of Texas at Austin

We live in a world where the collection and analysis of information is essential to the success of every business, candidate, team, or proposition. Whether it’s what Netflix recommends you watch next, who is predicted to win the World Series, what products pop-up in your Amazon account based on your browsing history, we are surrounded by the effects of the collection, analysis, and predictions of all kinds of data. With terms such as ‘big data’ and ‘data-driven decision-making’ swarming around us, higher education and the collegiate recreation industry can’t ignore the presence or the importance of this trend. As we continue to be challenged to provide recreation and fitness opportunities to a swiftly evolving generation, what if we reconsidered our traditional definition of assessment and began to weave in creative and intentional data analytics within our departments? This presentation will focus on how to reconsider what we have traditionally defined as ‘assessment’ within our departments and how we might apply this shift in thinking to become more agile, responsive, and relevant on our campuses.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Business Management • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Incorporate new and creative methods of data collection and analysis into a traditional department assessment environment.
  • Describe the challenges in developing an effective and comprehensive department data analytics program.
  • Apply a comprehensive approach to the collection, visualization, and analysis of information to help write the story we tell to our constituents.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 121 A-C

Deb Johnson, RCRSP, Director, University of California-Davis; Reed Phinisey, Assistant Director, University of California-Davis

Changing the culture of a recreation center can be extremely difficult, but it’s not impossible. Whether it’s potential barriers to accessibility, toxic behavior, or a lack of identity—these are all potential problems facing our facilities and programs. This doesn’t have to be the case anymore. We’re excited to share a model that we innovated at UC Davis, which has found great success in creating change. The model is easy to duplicate, providing you with a framework to create the culture you’ve envisioned for your recreation center.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Programming • Philosophy & Theory • Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Develop a model that will break down barriers for people to feel comfortable using your facility.
  • Describe the tools needed to change the culture of your rec center.
  • Conduct staff trainings and provide a work environment that empowers your students to lead change.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 126 A-C

Kari Osborne Albarado, Director of Campus Recreation, East Tennessee State University; Savanna Moeller, Coordinator of Operations and Aquatics, East Tennessee State University

In collegiate recreation, we are faced with ethical dilemmas nearly every day. Whether an individual recognizes these as dilemmas depends on the personal values and mission of the individual. When thinking of “right” versus “wrong,” we are referring to ethics. Learning codes of personal conduct begins as a child and develops over time. Being able to recognize, develop, and implement a personal mission statement and identify internal ethics can lead to harnessing success by living values in the workplace. We invite you to explore your expectations of self and team related to ethical behavior. We will also help you develop strategies for addressing ethical challenges in recreation.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Define ethics and recognize the role ethics play in collegiate recreation.
  • Identify and communicate personal ethical values and how to apply those to the workplace.
  • Master strategies for addressing intrinsic and extrinsic ethical challenges in the workplace.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 126 A-C

Eric Nickel, CRSS, Director of University Recreation, James Madison University; David Bowles, CRSS, Interim Assoc. VP for Student Affairs, University of Florida

Many recreation and wellness programs are finding an increased demand for external reviews from their institutions. Pressure from state legislators and boards of trustees has encouraged many to seek these review services to help evaluate programs and services utilizing an external lens. But an equal number of programs are conducting them simply to get support from outside professionals to help tell their story, recognize what they do well, and identify opportunities for improvement. This program is designed to provide an understanding of the process of conducting an external program review of an existing department. The session will cover why a department might want to perform an external review, how to plan and prepare for a review and its associated costs, and what they can expect to get out of a well-conducted external review.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Business Management • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Articulate the typical reasons for conducting an external program review and the potential positive impacts it can have on your program.
  • Identify the components of a successful external program review and how to minimize challenges.
  • Describe the resource demands of conducting an external program review.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 131 A-C

Dexter Shorter, Associate Director for Competitive Sports & Tennis, Pennsylvania State University

Attendees will learn how to incorporate the Social Action, Leadership, and Transformation (SALT) model into leadership training by participating in interactive activities and examining the seven different components of the model. Specifically, this session will provide opportunities for attendees to articulate individual values, identify group values, and impact the greater community in order to advance the wellbeing of all populations and achieve social justice. We will look at how leadership development through the SALT model can have a positive impact on students holistically as well as encourage professional growth.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Personal & Professional Qualities • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Incorporate the SALT model into your curriculum of staff and student development trainings, workshops, and seminars
  • Describe the impact of including leadership development models within staff and student development approaches.
  • Lead activities that can be utilized when facilitating training, workshops, and seminars that include the SALT model.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 131 A-C

Peter Murray, CRSS, Director of Campus Recreation, Unviersity of Massachusetts -Lowell

Whether you’re responsible for a small inventory of supplies or a million dollars in revenues, it’s crucial that you learn to protect your organization from theft. Learn to evaluate your own work unit, determine risk, and apply appropriate solutions by increasing your knowledge of cash control weakness, detective controls, and preventive controls.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Legal Liabilities & Risk Management • Business Management • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Identify at least one example of cash control weakness.
  • Identify at least one example each of a preventive control and a detective control.
  • Identify at least one appropriate solution to mitigate risk.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 131 A-C

Monica Webb, Program Director, GatorWell

Our college student population is representative of Generation Z. Born between 1995 and 2010, Gen Z is the most diverse, most technologically connected generation to date. In their world, knowledge is infinite and immediate. This session will focus on the distinguishing characteristics of Gen Z and how they compare to other generations. Through the application of the Eight Dimensions of Wellness, participants will describe Gen Z wellness, infuse health and wellbeing practices into various recreational programs, and discuss potential strategies for engaging this generation in collegiate recreation and wellness.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Describe Generation Z characteristics as they apply to the Eight Dimensions of Wellness model.
  • Apply techniques to infuse health and wellbeing practices into recreational programs.
  • Discuss potential strategies for engaging Generation Z in collegiate recreation and wellness.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 127 A-C

Patricia Lynn, Assistant Director of Campus Recreation, Roanoke College

How can we foster experiences that are intrinsically fulfilling to an individual? Learn about, discuss, and apply the concepts of autotelic experiences, flow theory, and resonance. When these ideas are intentionally incorporated into your program, they can create meaningful experiences with the potential to alter the life path of a participant or staff member. Through the lens of the presenter’s self-study of outdoor recreation and education, discover how you can develop a stronger and more transformational program for all those involved. This process can open the potential for inter-departmental partnerships and increased marketing abilities, but more importantly it will aid participants and staff in their own growth and development.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Define autotelic experiences, flow theory, and the resonance performance model and explore these concepts using the specific self-study presented.
  • Understand how concepts explored in flow and resonance relate to personal experiences in outdoor programming, and analyze your own relationship with the outdoors.
  • Utilize these concepts in your own outdoor programming to generate more meaningful experiences resulting in increased participation, ability to create lasting transformational experiences, and potential for inter-departmental partnerships on campus.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 131 A-C

Jenny Rodgers, Fitness and Wellness, Clemson University; Brooke Beidler, Assistant Director of Integrated Fitness, Clemson University; Robert Taylor, Director of Programs and Assessment, Clemson University

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is a widely known theory describing the factors that motivate human behavior. We may remember learning about this concept from early psychology classes or within conversation about theories in higher education, but have we thought about it in terms of the programming we create and facilitate on a daily basis? This session will explore each level of Maslow’s pyramid as it relates to the different levels of programming on our campuses. Session attendees will have the opportunity to identify how their programming currently fits into each “area of need” and how it can grow from there. We will also explore some of the barriers that may prevent programs from reaching their highest potential, or “the top of the pyramid,” and some strategies to better navigate those challenges.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Describe Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs as it relates to human motivation as well as programming in a collegiate recreation setting.
  • Recognize where our current programming efforts fall within the Hierarchy of Needs and what barriers might exist.
  • Identify key partners on campus or within the community that can contribute to higher-level programming.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 121 A-C

Chelsea Phipps, Assistant Director, Facilities & Special Events, UNC Greensboro; Brandon Barnes, Graduate Assistant of Competitive Sports, University of West Georgia; Andy Boehnlein, Assistant Director of Intramural Sports and Adaptive Recreation, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; Corrine Pruett, Operations and Events Coordinator, West Virginia University

“It’s not about how hard you get hit, it’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward.” Taking a page from Rocky Balboa, this session aims to talk about the inevitable personal adversities that we will face at some point in our lives and how we choose to respond. How do we persevere, overcome, and thrive? How can we help others who turn to us in times of need? These can be difficult conversations in the workplace, but are critical to creating a culture of care and a supportive work environment. Through a conceptual framework, we will outline strategies to confront adversity and develop resiliency during difficult times. Join us as we explore real-life situations and share lessons learned along the way that can help you and your work team!

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Philosophy & Theory • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Create a definition of resiliency through the lens of personal adversity.
  • Develop strategies to move forward through personal hardships and thrive.
  • Identify tools to support and mentor others on their own difficult journeys.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 124 AB

Steve Erickson, CRSS,RCRSP, Director, Montana State University; Kelsie Bourque, Assistant Director of Business Operations & Memberships, Montana State University; Whitney Hinshaw, Recreation Coordinator, Group Exercise Programs and Health/Safety Instruction, Montana State University; Jocelyn Larson, Assistant Director of Personal Fitness Services, Montana State University; Spencer Sorensen, Associate Director, Montana State University

In March 2019, Montana State University experienced a roof collapse that impacted recreation programs and services. What impact did this have to staff and programs? How did staff reschedule and recover their areas of responsibility? How did the staff collaborate with campus partners to get their units stabilized? What would they have done differently? What did they learn from this experience? Attend this panel to learn their story.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Facility Management, Planning & Design • Business Management • Legal Liabilities & Risk Management

Learning Objectives
  • Describe insurance implication of a catastrophic event.
  • Ask relevant questions about your campuses emergency action plan and how it relates to your facility and services.
  • Recognize next steps and who your campus partners are to navigate a catastrophic event.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 224 A

Cara Lucia, PhD, Associate Professor, Elon University; Mila Padgett, Director, Campus Recreation and Wellness, University of South Carolina Aiken

The gender equity movement and the passage of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 played key roles in advancing collegiate recreation (McFadden and Molina, 2016). Almost fifty years later there is still limited information regarding the experiences had by women in collegiate recreation. Understanding the characteristics that make up a woman’s experience in collegiate recreation, this study provides an exploratory perspective of women in the industry regarding roles and the positions held in the field. As women continue their professional trajectory in the collegiate recreation field personal levels of self-efficacy may impact applying for a new position, taking on a new role in the department, or applying to serve in a volunteer leadership role. The study created space for women to share experiences regarding individual human capital, gender differences, and prejudice as they learn to work through the leadership labyrinth.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the complex journey had by women as they navigate their professional careers.
  • Identify interventions for professionals to address the complexities faced by women.
  • Create strategies to best support women in the workplace.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 121 A-C

Courtney Copp, Member Services Coordinator, University of Arizona; Allison Einhouse, Facility Reservations and Special Projects Coordinator, University of Arizona

This presentation will explore technology surrounding sustainable power sources used in current athletic and recreation facilities. We will explore sustainable fitness programming—how it’s used in campus recreation and how we are doing it—marketing, education, and special projects.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Facility Management, Planning & Design • Programming • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Implement sustainable fitness programming and the use of marketing to promote sustainability.
  • Describe sustainable power sources and how they are used in current facilities.
  • Examine specific marketing and education tactics focused on sustainable practices and sustainable purchasing.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 224 A

Alex McNally, University of Alberta

Imagine a group of LGBTQ+ students hoping to play hockey at your institution. What barriers would they face? The Other Team is the University of Alberta’s first LGBTQ+ and allies intramural hockey team, founded in 2016. Learn how our team started, what sets us apart from other teams, why it matters, and how you can foster a similar experience at your institution.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Programming • Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Identify strategies to improve diversity and inclusion in their own institution’s programs.
  • Describe the impact and importance of an inclusive recreation program on LGBTQ2S+ students.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 224 A

Samantha Steel, Head Lifeguard/ WSI, Virginia Commonwealth University; Mike Conley, Coordinator, Outdoor Excursions, University of California-Riverside

Emergencies happen, it’s what you do during them that counts. Practice through emergency audits prepares students for real life emergencies. Over the past two years, UNLV has transformed their aquatics-based emergency audit program to be a student-run program centered around training. The lecture-style presentation will discuss the history of emergency audits at UNLV and the changes that were made to make the program more successful as well as student centered. Evaluations sheets and tracking templates will be shared with attendees. There will be time at the end for an optional practice session. The student-centered audit program used can be modified to fit the needs of any facility or campus.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Legal Liabilities & Risk Management • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Implement a student-run emergency audit program at your campus.
  • Modify the documents shared to meet the needs of your facility.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 131 A-C

Jillian Dolciato, Club Sports Coordinator, Xavier University; Andrew Bruni, Assistant Director of Student Development and Operations, CENTERS, LLC At University of Missouri-St Louis; Leigh Fouts, Fitness and Wellness Coordinator, Georgia Southern University-Armstrong Campus

In this presentation, we will be diving into the newest group of college students: Generation Z. We will unpack who they are and what unique challenges they are bringing with them, such as difficulty handling adversity. This presentation will address solutions to developing this upcoming generation as well as explore what we should expect to see within our participation numbers and outcomes.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Identify attributes of the current generation of traditional college students within Generation Z.
  • Identify unique experiences we can create for Generation Z in the workplace in order to best help them grow and develop.
  • Explore how Generation Z will impact programmatic participation and strategies to increase participation for this generation.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 228 AB

Sponsored by SKYfactor

Phoenix Harvey, Director of Marketing, Institutional Solutions, Macmillan Learning

In this highly interactive session, attendees will get to experience a variety of ways that student engagement and feedback on campus recreational activities could be captured and analyzed. From tracking attendance during high-impact activities to gauging students’ conceptual understanding, student engagement opportunities are endless yet within reach with the ubiquity of mobile devices. The session will explore how student recreation staff and administrators can utilize engagement tools and best practices across campus for real-time insight and analytics that can help improve key retention indicators.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Discuss research on the impact of attendance and engagement in campus activities on student outcomes.
  • Identify how student responses systems can be utilized to track student attendance, engagement, comprehension, and satisfaction with campus activities and events.
  • Be able to utilize insights from analytics on student attendance and engagement for the early identification of students at risk of departing the institution.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 228 AB

Kimberley Curtin, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Alberta; Avneet Hayer, Recreation Facilitator, University of Alberta

International students have shown lower rates of participation in campus recreation compared to their domestic counterparts. It is imperative that recreation professionals understand how to assess the needs of international students and develop effective programming to support the health and wellbeing of this group. In this session we will examine barriers to recreation for international students, discuss how to better serve international students, and finish with examples of past programs and current initiatives. We will also integrate how to use behavior theory to develop and evaluate programs for international students.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Programming • Philosophy & Theory • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Identify the diverse needs of your international student community.
  • Foster partnership opportunities with academic departments to develop and evaluate programs.
  • Utilize behavioral theory as a way to develop and evaluate recreational programs for international students.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 127 A-C

Scott Reed, Associate Director, University of Virginia

New to facility project management? There are few playbooks or training programs out there that help recreation facility managers learn the basics and operational nuances of small and large project management. Join other facility management colleagues in learning or refreshing yourself on the basics of project management in a higher education setting. Session will include framework and basic operational level information as well as interaction opportunities with peers.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Facility Management, Planning & Design

Learning Objectives
  • Define facility project management and understand the project life cycle.
  • Recognize differences and connections between internal and external project management.
  • Utilize hands-on operational project management applications towards managing projects in the future.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 223

Presented by NIRSA’s Professional Registry Commission

Daniel Lawrence, RCRSP, Director of Campus Recreation, Utah State University; Suzanne Berkey, RCRSP, WELL Operations Specialist, U.S. Green Building Council; George Brown, PhD,RCRSP, CRSS, Assistant Vice Provost and Director of University Recreation and Wellness, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; Earl Cabellon, RCRSP, Assistant Director, Human Resources & Student Development, University of Maryland-College Park; Brian Stelzer, RCRSP, Assistant Director of Sport Clubs and Youth Programs, University of Nebraska

Join the growing number of collegiate recreational sports professionals who are making a commitment to intentional professional development. With the Registered Collegiate Recreational Sports Professional (RCRSP) designation, you can demonstrate your commitment to a higher standard. RCRSPs demonstrate professionalism, quality, and a commitment to: Staying current in the profession’s topics, trends, and best practices through their participation in continuing education and volunteer service opportunities; Professional and personal growth; Advancing the collegiate recreational sports profession on their campus and in the field of higher education. Be a part of this discussion-packed session and hear from Registry Commissioners about the RCRSP process, updates to the registry, and benefits of RCRSP to you as a professional.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Determine how developing a plan for growth will affect your future as a professional.
  • Identify the actions necessary to become a lifelong learner committed to both personal and professional development.
  • Understand the value of working toward a broad knowledge base that will increase your credibility with others.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 228 AB

Stephen Putnam, RCRSP, Director, Garrett College; Kevin Armstrong, Project Manager, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture; Michael Massey, RLA, Senior Associate, Texas Regional Director, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture

How can we best serve small college and community college campus recreation when resources won’t allow for a new facility to be built on its own? This session will explore the possibilities for creating a win-win partnership between a college and a local community resulting in the construction of a recreation center. We will present on how this win-win partnership was considered using three separate successful case studies and vantage points: from the collegiate recreation director’s perspective, the community’s perspective, and the design perspective. We will talk about successes, challenges, and lessons learned to help brainstorm possibilities and dream big about a future facility for your campus.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Facility Management, Planning & Design • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Initiate a dialogue within your college and the community to start the conversation about a partnership to build a recreation center.
  • Identify potential community partners that could help take part in building a center with your institution.
  • Develop a strategy for engaging key stakeholder and partnership groups to achieve a successful outcome.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 228 AB

André Love, Executive Director, University Recreation, The University of Alabama; Gerard Love, Executive Director Collegiate Recovery, University of Alabama

As a student-centered support service, the collegiate recovery community (CRC) acknowledges the importance of a holistic approach in early and ongoing recovery. Partnering with university recreation engages CRC members with multiple domains of wellness and overall wellbeing that are known to enhance and support recovery. This presentation highlights the impact a campus resource has on a community of students in recovery in terms of physical activity, joy, and fun. Assessment data and inspiring video will be shared.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Programming • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Generate creative ideas to engage students in recovery.
  • Identify a wellbeing model in relation to CRC programming and “recovery capital.”
  • Articulate the benefits of campus collaborations and the impact of physical activity as a component of recovery.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 224 A

Austin Anderson, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Southern Indiana; Adrienne Ansel, Fitness Graduate Assistant, Bowling Green State University; Robert Barcelona, PhD, Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire; Taryn Price, PhD, Assistant Professor, Oklahoma State University; Jill Sturts, PhD, Assistant Professor of Recreation and Leisure Studies, Virginia Wesleyan University; Jason Vlastaras, Associate Director of Student Success, Iowa State University

Assessment of campus recreation programming is commonplace at many NIRSA member institutions—but it’s not always well understood, utilized or discussed in relation to formal academic research. This session, led by members of the NIRSA Research & Assessment Committee and the RSJ Editorial Board, will delineate major differences between assessment and research, and participants will gain an understanding of the importance of formal research and how it can be used in designing effective campus recreational programming and practice. Participants will collaboratively discuss and design campus recreational programming utilizing real-life research examples published in the Recreational Sport Journal (RSJ). Participants will also have the opportunity to learn about the academic publishing process and the value of turning assessment projects they may already be doing into research that can impact the profession.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Programming • Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Explain the importance of campus recreation research and identify how it can help practitioners design effective recreational programming.
  • Describe the process of turning assessment projects into research and be able to describe the process and value of publication within the Recreational Sports Journal.
  • Point out what has/can be done with programming based on the use of research published in the Recreational Sports Journal.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 128 AB

Jason Vlastaras, Associate Director of Student Success, Iowa State University; Jaclyn Vlastaras

In a time of reduced budgets and increased scrutiny, the implementation of career readiness skills can create a win-win scenario on multiple fronts. Career readiness relates to the marketable skills we hope our staff develops through the student employment process. Join us as we take you through the national focus and university priorities of career readiness; share data collected from various universities highlighting career readiness action; and provide you with a career-ready outline and toolkit for starting your own career readiness program for student employees.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Human Resources Management • Personal & Professional Qualities • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Identify the link between the student employment experience and the application of career readiness competencies.
  • Recognize the importance of developing a career readiness implementation plan through the review of student employment data.
  • List several tools for evaluating and implementing career readiness competencies with student employees.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 125 AB

Scott Flickinger, Director, Intramural Sports and Noyes Community Rec Center, Cornell University; Marty Dempsey, Associate Director For Facility Operations, University of Florida; Ashley Lax, Assistant Director of Competitive Sports, University of Wisconsin- Madison; Valerie McCutchan, National Sports Program Director, NIRSA Headquarters; David Peters, RCRSP, Associate Director, Campus Recreation, Florida State University

Join in for a special in-person panel edition of “Series Talk,” the NIRSA Championship Series podcast. This session will feature The Series’ executive board and a different format for presenting updates, accomplishments, and initiatives on all of the NIRSA Championship Series sports (basketball, flag football, soccer, and tennis). Hear from many of the NIRSA Championship Series work team chairs as they discuss the progress of the NIRSA Championship Series and outline what stakeholders can look forward to in the year to come.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming

Learning Objectives
  • List the programs and operational areas within the Championship Series during an academic year.
  • Describe how the Championship Series functions for participants and volunteers under the Series 2.0 Long-Term Vision.
  • Summarize how the Championship Series performed within the 2019-2020 academic year in terms of its sports programming.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 124 AB

Rachael Decker, Assistant Director Programs, Office of Recreation, University of Toledo; Caroline Dotts, Associate Director- Healthy Lifestyle Programs, Georgia Institute of Technology; April Lovett, Strategic Planning & Assessment Analyst- Health & Wellness Portfolio, Florida State University

You’re already running late when your coworker drops by your office to see if you can help with a quick project. You feel guilty for telling them no, but you also don’t want your child to be the last one picked up at daycare. Do you stay? Or do you go? And how do you shake the “work-guilt” or “mom-guilt” that is sure to come with either choice? In this interactive session, three working moms will explore perceptions of gender roles in the workplace, discuss how to manage expectations as a working mother, and offer take-away strategies working moms (and those who support them) can use to feel successful in both realms.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Human Resources Management • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the current landscape of working moms in the campus recreation field.
  • Apply strategies to overcome the dichotomy of working parents.
  • Discuss the support and resources needed in the field for working parents for positive wellbeing practices.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 121 A-C

Neill Frazier, Alma Mater

Having an alumni program isn’t just good for the sport clubs themselves, its extremely beneficial for the sport club department as a whole. When sport clubs have the ability to reach out to their alumni for support and financial donations, it puts stress off of the departments to provide more funding.Learn the tools to successfully approach, connect, and engage with your sport club alumni.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Programming • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Apply strategies to help your student organizations create meaningful relationships with their alumni.
  • Identify the three critical aspects of engaging with alumni.
  • Apply strategies to engage, communicate, and fundraise with their sport club alumni.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 125 AB

Stacey Fieldsend, USTA-United States Tennis Association – Orlando, FL; Newlyn Wing, USTA-United States Tennis Association

The U.S. Tennis Association has been a long-time partner with NIRSA and wants to support campus recreation professionals even more. From youth camps to internships, intramurals to club programs, the USTA has a program and resources that fit the needs of both students and campus professionals. We offer program packages as well as localized support through our industry network. Come join us to learn about the sport of a lifetime!

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming • Research & Evaluation • Business Management

Learning Objectives
  • Describe what the U.S. Tennis Association can offer to support tennis programming run on college campuses.
  • Execute an engaging and inclusive club and intramural tennis program at your institution.
  • Create awareness of the U.S. Tennis Association’s official youth brand Net Generation.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 127 A-C

Claudia Cooper, Rec Sports and Family Programs, University of Houston; Joseph Secrest, Assistant Director of Leadership Development and Assessment, University of Houston

This session aims to leverage the exponential growth of technology. Specifically, this session will go into how learning management software provides students with unique learning opportunities on their terms while paying dividends back to the organization. This session will discuss utilizing a blended learning model to create an environment that benefits both parties by cutting organizational costs, increasing available space in a finite building, and maximizing the time and energy of those who are responsible and participating. With all trainings an employee can be physically present and mentally absent. Balancing the needs of a department and the wants of an employee, the University of Houston’s Department of Campus Recreation gives an in-depth look at the beauties and the pitfalls of experimenting with blended learning using the learning management software Articulate to create an E-learning module that covers departmental knowledge (e.g. professionalism, job expectations, customer service, conflict resolution, and decision making) through a series of interactive trainings, recordings, and games to promote a minimum level of competency when newly hired employees arrive on shift.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Human Resources Management • Personal & Professional Qualities • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Describe blended learning methods and the domains of learning that show the value of E-learning.
  • Identify possible partnerships and/or resources to begin the process of E-learning on your own campus.
  • Conceptualize the demands of implementing learning management software.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 124 AB

Peter Tulchinsky, Director of Campus Recreation, University of Mississippi; Jonathan Almond, Graduate Assistant – Fitness, University of Mississippi; Amanda Alpert, Associate Director of Campus Recreation – Programs, University of Mississippi

On-campus student employment shares common characteristics with recognized high-impact practices (HIP) in higher education, but doesn’t typically receive HIP distinction. This presentation will demonstrate how on-campus student employment exhibits HIP criteria and will showcase a student development model which helps students articulate skills and connections learned through their collegiate recreation employment experience.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Identify high-impact practices in higher education and demonstrated common characteristics.
  • Define the four components of the model, how its components relate to high-impact characteristics, and observe examples of student learning in each of the model’s components.
  • Implement this model by applying strategies and assessment techniques.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 223

Jennifer Pecoraro, PhD, Assistant Professor, Sport Management, University of West Georgia; Drew Guay, Director of Recreation Programs, Plymouth State University

Join us for this interactive session that explores current practices and scholarly research associated with transgender allyship and advocacy in collegiate recreation programs and services (CRS) specific to the workplace experience. Attendees will leave the session with foundational trans-allyship and advocacy knowledge and a custom action plan developed through guided, critical self-reflection. The aim of this presentation is to promote and further develop leaders in NIRSA regarding the proactive establishment of the CRS workplace as a gender equitable space for current and future practitioners.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Define transgender advocacy and allyship as it applies to collegiate recreation colleagues.
  • Identify at least one strategy to promote transgender advocacy and allyship within the workplace.
  • Conduct a self-reflection of the presence of workplace transgender advocacy and allyship at your program with the accompanying development of an action plan.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 127 A-C

Nick Remmes, Recreation Facilities Coordinator, Drake University; Michael Brito, Graduate Coordinator of Sport Clubs & Student Development, Rowan University; Cheyanne Clouse, Fitness Graduate Assistant, University of Mississippi; Juliana Frigerio, Competitive Sports Graduate Assistant, The University of Alabama; Katherine Haarmann, Intramural Sports Graduate Assistant, University of Arkansas

As the Student Leadership Team, we realize that stress comes with transitioning—especially when it comes to academics, relationships, location, or professions. We would like to impart our wisdom to the Students of NIRSA regarding how they can best handle these scenarios as they move forward. We hope that students feel more prepared after this session to face these difficult scenarios.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Articulate what your personal values are.
  • Identify what challenges you might face as you come into a new role.
  • Feel more prepared and less stressed to face challenges..

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 128 AB

Michael Williams, Director of Fitness and Recreation, Wentworth Institute of Technology; Maura Mulligan, Assistant Dean of Students/Director, Center for Wellness, Wentworth Institute of Technology

The counseling office and recreation department might seem like the “odd couple” when it comes to student success; however, for three colleges they have produced transformative programs. Find out how this collaboration between therapists and personal trainers has been a game changer for students dealing with anxiety and depression, and how it has not only allowed them to persist with college but to shine.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Describe how exercise can be used as a front-line treatment for anxiety and depression.
  • Develop cross-campus partnerships to enhance the profile of the campus recreation department at your institution.
  • Explain how a collaboration between counseling services and campus recreation can increase student success and retention.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 128 AB

William Trent, Marketing Manager, Virginia Tech

Ever feel like you’re throwing “marketing spaghetti” at a wall to see what sticks? Me too, which is why I developed this presentation to enhance my department’s marketing strategy. Whether you’re dedicated to marketing or you’re simply hoping to create positive change in your world, this is for you. This action-packed session draws inspiration from multiple marketing books to help you define your brand, create ideas that will spread, and become “market-focused” to build your tribe.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Research & Evaluation • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Differentiate between “branding” and “marketing.”
  • Apply the “Six STEPPS” of creating contagious ideas/viral content.
  • Create a foundation to target your “smallest viable market” to build tribes that do the work for you.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 122 A-C

Lexi Chaput, Senior Assistant Director, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; Caroline Dotts, Associate Director- Healthy Lifestyle Programs, Georgia Institute of Technology

As your career progresses, you may find yourself in a middle-management role where you are providing leadership to others in the department, but you’re not considered department leadership. These types of positions can be challenging to navigate as you step out of the day-to-day work and into a more strategic and supervisory role. This presentation will examine the skills and strategies you will need to thrive in this world, as well as ways to identify your impact on the department in this role.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Philosophy & Theory • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Define middle-management and describe how it is different from functional- and upper-management
  • Articulate 3-5 qualities that current directors identified as necessary for success in middle-management.
  • Differentiate between the type of information included in communication to upper-management and that included in communication to functional-management.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 121 A-C

Steve Kinsey, Senior Assistant Director, Intramural and Club Sports, Sam Houston State University; Kaleah Torgerson, Intramural Sports Graduate Assistant, Texas A & M University-College Station

There are a countless number of student development theories. Yet, there seems to be no tried and true method for engaging with and developing students. Between generations, identities, belief systems, and other factors that make students unique, you may be left wondering if there actually is an answer. This presentation will show that five easy steps (and one acronym) will help develop each and every one of the students you work with.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the basic student development theory behind the STARS development program.
  • Develop student staff using the five-step STARS system.
  • Implement the STARS system in your program.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 228 AB

Andy Milton, RCRSP, Director, Wellness and Recreation, Saint Ambrose University

The Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education, or CAS, released its 10th edition of Professional Standards in Spring 2019 on the 40th anniversary of the CAS organization being founded. Included in the CAS book are the Collegiate Recreation Standards. Changes in the standards impact how you may conduct CAS-based assessments within your overall collegiate recreation program, no matter how small or large your institution size. Come and learn not only what CAS is, but also take a walk through each of the 12 components of the Collegiate Recreation Standards. Attendees will then see examples of how 1-2 specific Collegiate Recreation Standards can be applied within your recreation program, service, or area. The session will include information regarding how to act on your findings.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the CAS Standards for Collegiate Recreation and their application to the field, your department, your program, and your job.
  • Utilize the Collegiate Recreation Standards to conduct assessments within multiple areas of your programs, services, and facilities.
  • Explain how the CAS Individual Self Assessment Guide (for Collegiate Recreation) can complement your CAS-based program review or assessment.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 125 AB

Courtney Balderas, Assistant Director of the Dreamers Center, University of Texas San Antonio; Victoria Lopez-Herrera, Senior Associate Director, The University of Texas at San Antonio

TBD

Learning Objectives
  • TBD

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 125 AB

David Gould, Solution One Partners

Rec centers face many of the same challenges as commercial health clubs. How do you attract new members? How do you retain the members you already have? How do you get your members to engage with your facility—to feel like a member of the “family”? In this presentation, you will learn how rec centers can emulate commercial health clubs that have successfully implemented award programs to achieve all of these goals. Even the smallest rec center can benefit from these techniques to improve their finances, member services,and overall health.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Business Management • Programming • Business Management

Learning Objectives
  • Recognize how award programs can be utilized to increase membership, improve member engagement, reduce turnover, and encourage member referrals.
  • Implement comprehensive award programs for your facility.
  • Identify critical areas of your operations that could benefit from an awards program.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 127 A-C

Veronica Chevalier, Aquatics Program and Risk Management Coordinator, University of Notre Dame; Cody Ballinger, Competitive Sport Coordinator, West Virginia University; Katie Thomas, Texas A & M University- Commerce

In order to rise, shine, and be our best selves, we must find value and belonging in our work. In 2019, the World Health Organization recognized burnout as an official mental health syndrome, starting the conversation about both medical diagnosis and treatment available by healthcare providers. Yet, sufferers oftentimes fail to recognize the fire is burning until they are already burnt out. In this presentation, attendees will learn what makes burnout unique, how it affects the collegiate recreation workplace, and preventative measures for supervisors, their employees, and student staff. Though you may have not started the fire, after this presentation you will be better equipped to extinguish the flames.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Identify the signs and symptoms of burnout in yourself and others.
  • Appreciate the implications of unaddressed burnout and workplace culture.
  • Incorporate conversations regarding burnout and managing workplace stress with your colleagues.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 127 A-C

Amber Long, Executive Director Wellness & Recreation Services, University of Colorado Denver; Kyle Smith, Assistant Director Wellness and Outdoor Pursuits, University of Colorado Denver

Create a referral-based, peer wellbeing coaching program on your campus. Learn how to structure a wellbeing referral program, train peer wellbeing coaches, and identify and create buy in with strategic partners like academic advisers, student affairs professionals, and counseling services. Discover ways to engage the un-engaged student, build personal connections, and enhance student wellbeing and overall resilience.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming • Philosophy & Theory • Business Management

Learning Objectives
  • Identify campus partners for student wellbeing.
  • Create a peer-based wellbeing coaching model.
  • Develop and implement a wellbeing referral program on your own campus.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 128 AB

Wes Bonadio, Associate Director – Programs, Ohio University; Mark Ferguson, Executive Director, Ohio University

Initiating an effective wellbeing model can be overwhelming, and focusing on wellness dimensions can often reinforce silos and stereotypes. Learn about a NIRSA member institute’s unique approach to wellbeing and how it’s changing the culture on its campus. By attending this presentation, audience members will get a different perspective on this evolving topic, understand the process it took to re-envision health and wellbeing, and explore implementation strategies to initiate new ideas and create different conversations to advance health and wellbeing efforts at their own institution.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Programming • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Describe state of health and wellbeing in collegiate recreation and higher education.
  • Identify at least one guiding principle to create an effective wellbeing model.
  • Identify at least one research-based model of wellbeing and its related elements.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 124 AB

Sponsored by Populous

Gudmundur Jonsson, Principal, Populous; Julie Rinaldi, Populous; Rich Mylin, Director of Recreation, University of California-San Diego

Esports is the globe’s fastest-growing sport with more than $1.1 billion of global esports venue in 2019. It attracts a diverse community that surpasses physical and digital boundaries and bridges individual differences. Low barriers to entry create an equal platform for all to play regardless of physical fitness or abilities. Esports does not start and end at the computer either. Today’s esports athletes are training in world-class facilities that focus on both mind and body training. Mental strength, nutrition and physical fitness give professional esports athletes the incremental edge over their competition. The presentation will include two universities currently leading the campus esports charge – UC San Diego who is building new spaces specifically for esports and The University of Oklahoma which is utilizing digital platforms with lower barriers to market. When esports finds a home in campus recreation, everyone wins!

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Facility Management, Planning & Design • Programming • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Define Esports
  • Describe how esports is currently being accommodated on campuses.
  • Describe programmatic inclusions for esports facilities.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 128 AB

Sera Zegre, Research Coordinator, West Virginia University; Andrew Darling, RCRSP, Director of Campus Recreation, West Virginia University; Craig Decker, RCRSP, Director, CENTERS LLC at the University of Alabama at Birmingham

As we seek to count our participants, set informed goals, and quantify our value, how does campus recreation count and define participants? At what level of participation do academic benefits occur? Finally, what participant groupings are both practically useful and statistically significant? This session is geared toward those who seek to count or study participants. Presenters will demonstrate the impact of various user and will use group definitions through examining the relationship between campus recreation participation and student persistence from their first year to their second, as well as first year cumulative GPA. Presenters will also offer recommendations for how to define and group participants.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Business Management • Philosophy & Theory • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Apply theory and literature to decisions regarding how to define participants and user groupings in reporting, goal setting, and research.
  • Describe and apply previous research of value to campus recreation, specifically related to how to define group participants.
  • Summarize research on the value of campus recreation in student success.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 126 A-C

Julia Buchanan, PhD, CHES, EP-C, NBC-HWC, Assistant Professor and Program Coordinator, Heath Promotion and Education, University of Cincinnati, Health Promotion & Education; Shannon DuPree, DHSc, CHES,CWP,HWC, Director of Wellness, North Carolina State University at Raleigh; Courtney Hoffman, MS, CHES,HWC, Wellness Coordinator, University of Kentucky

The health and wellness coaching field has experienced exponential growth in the last few years, showing its positive effects in the areas of worksite wellness, primary care, and more. The benefits of health coaching expand to colleges and universities where staff can be trained to impact the health behaviors of their campus community members through listening, reflecting, motivational interviewing, goal setting, and accountability. The development of masterful coaching skills and the ability to enable others to build self-efficacy are robust, translatable leadership qualities. So, how can we approach training our students to become effective health coaches? And once we set the foundation, what could a health coaching intervention look like within our program and service offerings? Together, we’ll explore various strategies for training and developing a health coaching staff, and examine a variety of ways health coaching can be infused within your campus environments through collaboration and creativity.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Programming • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Define the roles, responsibilities, and scope of practice of a health coach.
  • Identify various strategies for training and evaluating student health coaches.
  • Describe at least three possible ways to implement health coaching programming on your campus.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 121 A-C

Nyssa Owen, Assistant Director Wellness & Recreation, University of Miami; Jennifer Cobarrubias, Assistant Director of Aquatics, Stanford University

Have you experienced an unplanned facility closure due to elements completely outside your control? If you haven’t, do you feel prepared to do so? This session will walk you through a framework to help you craft an emergency closure plan before a crisis strikes. Additionally, it will help attendees learn about the uncontrollable elements across the nation affecting our facilities so they feel prepared to handle a crisis closure wherever their career takes them.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Legal Liabilities & Risk Management • Facility Management, Planning & Design

Learning Objectives
  • List various events that cause facility closures across the nation.
  • Communicate for which crisis situations your facility lacks comprehensive strategy.
  • Craft a crisis protocol for unplanned facility closures at your facility.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 127 A-C

Robert Weeks, Assistant Director of Aquatics, University of Cincinnati; Autumn Cleverley, University of Cincinnati

Lifeguard shortages have become a problem across the country. After spending over 20 hours per week lifeguarding in Summer 2017—on top of fulfilling their normal job duties—the aquatics team knew that this could not go on. The presenters developed a plan to change how new staff is recruited and where those staff were pulled from while also removing traditional barriers to entering the lifeguard course. The presenters will show how they turned their staffing issues around, how that process continues to evolve and become more aggressive to make sure that they never wind up in that situation again, and how attendees can apply these techniques at their facility.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Programming • Human Resources Management • Legal Liabilities & Risk Management

Learning Objectives
  • Apply creative strategies to avoid staffing shortfalls.
  • Implement the University of Cincinnati’s lifeguard hiring plan at your institution.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 122 A-C

Courtney Rorex, Fitness Coordinator, University of Houston, University of Houston; Naomi Matley, Fitness Coordinator (Personal Training & Fitness Floor), North Carolina State University at Raleigh

The initial transition when beginning a new role can be an overwhelming period of time. By attending this presentation, individuals will be able to gain an understanding of potential challenges, obstacles, and exciting new opportunities to come when transitioning into a new position. Whether the transition is interdepartmental, at a new company/facility, or just an additional burst of responsibility, this presentation will walk attendees through essential tips that can assist them in excelling and being productive through change. We will highlight research and tips provided by Harvard professor Michael D. Watkins as described in his book The First 90 Days, and will use the perspectives and experiences of two young professionals to highlight how to navigate this transition while still maintaining overall wellbeing.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Develop a strategy for navigating the transition into a new role and apply the strategy throughout the first year.
  • Apply strategies learned to assist in self-management, earning staff respect and celebrating accomplishments.
  • Recognize potential challenges associated with transitioning into a new role and implement strategies to minimize stress and maximize overall wellbeing.

1.5 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-9:30 am    Room 224 A

Scott Tims; Monica Webb, Program Director, GatorWell

The Healthy Campus framework originated from the American College Health Association (ACHA) in 2000. The framework was based on Healthy People, a set of national objectives for preventing disease and promoting health. Healthy People objectives are updated every ten years and Healthy Campus followed suit by setting objectives for 2010 and 2020. In 2018, with the supported of ACHA, the national Healthy Campus leadership team began meeting to brainstorm the next generation of Healthy Campus. Through needs assessment, stakeholder input, and leadership team visioning, a framework with three entry points to being a Healthy Campus was designed. These entry points allow colleges and universities of various sizes and access to resources to find their place within the framework and build their capacity to create healthier campuses. This session will introduce the new Healthy Campus framework, tools related to each entry point of the framework, and potential strategies for applying the framework on your campus.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming • Research & Evaluation • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the new Healthy Campus framework.
  • Identify tools related to each entry point of the new Healthy Campus framework.
  • Discuss potential strategies for applying the next generation of the Healthy Campus framework at your institution.

1.5 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-9:30 am    Room 228 AB

Kristin DeAngelo, RCRSP, Director of Facilities, University of Arkansas; Becky Todd, CRSS, Director of Programs, University of Arkansas

Associate directors should join us for a conversation regarding necessary skills and competencies for success in this role, as well as to expand your network of fellow associate director colleagues. This session is designed for individuals who currently hold an associate director position in campus recreation.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Create a network of fellow associate directors to assist in professional development and with expanding your list of connections within the collegiate recreation field.
  • Identify challenges and develop successful strategies for becoming a more effective associate director.

1.5 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-9:30 am    Room 126 A-C

Christin Everson, Assistant Director of UREC, Marketing & Events, Seattle University; Benjamin Kohler, Group Fitness Coordinator, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; Kirsten Schumacher, Assistant Director of UREC, Competitive Sports, Seattle University

What’s your professional philosophy? This ever-evolving statement about what you believe in should be the driving force behind your decision making. This statement succinctly demonstrates your passion, values, and the overall experience you want to provide others. Not identifying your philosophy puts you at risk for working in environments that do not support you; reducing your opportunities for personal and professional development; and may lead to unsatisfying career experiences. In this presentation, we’ll discuss the significance of knowing and communicating your professional philosophy in order to enhance your professional experience. You’ll leave this session philosophy in hand and ready to communicate who you are to others.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Demonstrate the value of a succinct professional philosophy.
  • Reflect on personal values to support the creation of a professional philosophy.
  • Develop and communicate a personalized philosophy.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-9:30 am    Room 127 A-C

Lisa Lemler, Assistant Director – Programs, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; Victoria Lopez-Herrera, Senior Associate Director, The University of Texas at San Antonio

How can we define or re-define what it means to lead from a place of wellbeing and how that may impact our organization, our institutions, and even our industry? Explore a leadership model and its intersection with wellbeing. Analyze the impact of actively and intentionally leading from a place of wellbeing and centered leadership. Engage in discussion with colleagues in an effort to understand how our own leadership practices can help shape a well culture within our organizations and on our campuses.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Discover the the concept of creating a culture of wellbeing and wellbeing-based leadership, including analyzing individual, organizational, and societal expectations and impacts.
  • Articluate your capacity as a leader in cultivating a culture of wellbeing considering a variety of theoretical approaches, including centered leadership.
  • Describe the impact of women’s leadership as it contributes to developing a culture of health and wellbeing, including through analysis of the topics resilience and thriving.

1.5 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-9:30 am    Room 121 A-C

Trey Knight, Outdoor Recreation Coordinator, The University of Tennessee

Are you sure what laws apply to your department or program? When was the last time you reviewed case law? As busy programmers and administrators, we might not stay as up to date as we would like on what’s changing in the legal landscape of recreation law. Colleges and universities are big targets for lawsuits, and making sure your risk management and liability protection are current is a constant challenge. Join me as we look at how to structure our risk management analysis and plan while looking at types of laws and examples that might change how we look at what we do for liability protection. This is not your typical legal lecture but an interactive guided-discussion to help provoke and stimulate critical thinking from the group as we learn from one another about this critical topic.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Legal Liabilities & Risk Management • Human Resources Management • Business Management

Learning Objectives
  • Differentiate the types of laws and ways the legal system impacts how we manage risks and liabilities.
  • Discern the difference between express and implied assumption of risk.
  • Research the nature of contract law as it pertains to waivers/releases for minors in their state.

1.5 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-9:30 am    Room 224 B

Joshua Hamilton, Interim Director, African American Student Affairs, University of Arizona; Jennifer Pecoraro, PhD, Assistant Professor, Sport Management, University of West Georgia

In response to diversity and racial inclusion concerns arising at predominantly white institutes nationwide (PWIs), institution decision makers are hiring people of color (POC) as representation. This strategic inclusion of POC may seem inclusive; however, the practices of tokenism negatively impact these individuals and lead to role overload (Lewis, 2016). This presentation is designed to promote POC allyship and advocacy through a critical self-reflection, the teaching of foundational information regarding tokenism, and the development of an equity-driven action plan. This process will aid practitioners in being better prepared to support POC in collegiate recreation as a profession. This session will include an interactive experience for attendees that teaches foundational information, explores self-reflection, and leaves attendees with a custom action plan and the social collaborators needed to promote and support sustainable equity.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Human Resources Management • Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Define tokenism and identify its application in collegiate recreation programs and services.
  • Identify at least one effect of tokenism on collegiate recreation practitioners.
  • Conduct a self-reflection of the presence and effects of workplace tokenism at your own program while also developing an accompanying action plan.

1.5 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-9:30 am    Room 131 A-C

Kimberly Frick, Associate Director, Sexual Violence Prevention, Arizona State University; Tara Yesenski, Associate Director: Polytechnic and Sports Programs, Arizona State University

Campus recreation professionals play a significant role in enhancing the overall safety and wellbeing of students in higher education communities. They do this in many ways, including by reducing incidences of sexual assault, relationship violence, stalking, and harassment. Students in sport clubs are leaders on campus and should be trained to identify, address, and keep these incidents from occurring among their own teammates and fellow students in the broader community. Based on a successful program at Arizona State University, this presentation will help guide those working with students in sport clubs to develop a comprehensive and sustainable sexual violence prevention program that will reduce the incidence of this kind of behavior and increase bystander self-efficacy.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Programming

Learning Objectives
  • List the impacts of sexual violence on students participating in sport clubs.
  • Identify strategies for enhancing collaborations between campus partners and club sport leaders in order to create a sexual violence prevention program.
  • Develop an effective evaluation process for sexual violence prevention programming focused on sport clubs.

1.5 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-9:30 am    Room 128 AB

Alivia Gok, Recreation Therapist, California State University- Sacramento; Sarah Kirwan

This interactive disability-focused presentation addresses the hot-topic issues of equity, diversity and inclusion in campus recreation programs today. Although programs and recreational sports offered at colleges and universities must be accessible and inclusive of all students under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), many aren’t. Attendees will leave this session feeling empowered, having learned new skills and strategies to effectively address campus deficits in these areas.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Programming • Legal Liabilities & Risk Management • Facility Management, Planning & Design

Learning Objectives
  • Communicate and apply basic knowledge of disabilities and disability law, with the goal of creating solutions to common campus recreation issues including equity and inclusion.
  • Identify personal, interpersonal, and environmental barriers for people living with disabilities, apply problem-solving strategies, and develop equity-based solutions.
  • Describe inclusion in campus recreation, remove utilization barriers for all students, and construct an effective implementation plan for addressing deficits in your own city, town, and campus.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 122 A-C

Joshua Downing, Director of Recreation & Wellness, Butler University; Jocelyn Hill, Director of Recreational Sports & Fitness, American University; Shelbi Long, Director of Campus Recreation, Sonoma State University; André Love, Executive Director, University Recreation, The University of Alabama; James Wilkening, Executive Director, University of Central Florida

Do you feel ready to move into the Director’s chair for a recreation department? Hear from current directors as they reflect on lessons learned from their journeys to top leadership levels including developing skills in relationship building, political positioning, financial management, and executive leadership. Attendees with at least 7 years of professional experience including supervision of full-time staff are best positioned to gain the most from this session.

Knowledge Level

TBD (for internal staff use only)

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management • Business Management

Learning Objectives
  • TBD

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 122 A-C

Lauren Martini Olson, Associate Director of Campus Recreation, Programs, University of South Carolina-Columbia; Dillon Campbell, Colorado College; Ashly Goins, University of South Carolina-Columbia; Jennifer Knerr, Certified Athletic Trainer, University of Wyoming; Jenna Morogiello, Coordinator of Injury Prevention and Care, Georgia Southern; Wendy Sheppard, Assistant Director of Sports and Risk Management, University of Richmond

This panel will address the various ways to obtain athletic training services in the collegiate recreation setting. it will also cover designing an athletic training coverage model that best meets the needs of individual collegiate recreation programs in addition to preparing for upcoming changes in athletic training education and its impact on the graduate assistant athletic trainer model.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Legal Liabilities & Risk Management • Programming • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Identify potential community and campus resources and understand the different methods available for establishing athletic training services.
  • Design an athletic training coverage model that best fits the needs of your institution.
  • Explain the new academic requirements for athletic training education and its impact on collegiate recreation athletic training models.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 122 A-C

Chelsea Phipps, Assistant Director, Facilities & Special Events, UNC Greensboro; Austin Anderson, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Southern Indiana; Andy Boehnlein, Assistant Director of Intramural Sports and Adaptive Recreation, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; Brittney Holloman, Coordinator of Fitness and Wellness, San Francisco State University; Andrea Snead, Assistant Director, Recreation & Wellness Center, University of Central Florida; Julia Wallace Carr, James Madison University

Students today are embracing their intersecting identities. Many consider themselves part of the LGBTQ+ community and are choosing to come out of the closet with said identity. This can be the most difficult time of transition and transformation for an LGBTQ+ person. Fortunately, many students have been able to connect with their professional supervisor and feel comfortable speaking with them. Unfortunately, however, not all of these professional staff are ready or equipped to navigate this difficult conversation when approached by a student seeking counsel. So, how can we best support our LGBTQ+ students, who undoubtedly trust us with this most important aspect of their truth? What do they need? What resources are available to them, and to you? What could you say? Or should you not say? This panel aims to answer these questions, and more, through an informal conversation setting. We want to help you create a truly supportive, safe, and brave space to enable students to be vulnerable with you. Audience members will learn from lessons learned on both sides of the coming out journey, and be able to ask anonymous questions to help build their ally toolkit.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the unique challenges faced by members of the LGBTQ+ community who are in the closet.
  • Demonstrate allyship skills that foster an inclusive, brave space for our LGBTQ+ students.
  • Apply best practices to support and mentor LGBTQ+ students through the coming out process.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 122 A-C

Laura Klein, CRSS, Director, University of North Texas; Chris Allison, CEO, Geex, Inc.; Matt Grimm, RCRSP, Assistant Athletic Director, Campus Recreation, Stevenson University; David Kirk, Esports Program Director, Illinois State University; Garrett Larson, Competitive Sports Coordinator, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

Panelists will share their knowledge regarding the many moving parts of a successful esports program—how to start an esports program, budget considerations, varsity and club models, how scholarships are determined, how monetary winnings are handled, etc. Participants will be able to ask questions of each panelist.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the basic elements of a collegiate esports program.
  • Define program development specific to your institution.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 125 AB

Tiffany Lomax, Associate Director of Wellness, Recreation and Campus Events, Delaware State University; Jocelyn Hill, Director of Recreational Sports & Fitness, American University; Tara Parker, CRSS, Executive Director, Kennesaw State University; Felicia Tittle, Executive Director of Recreation & Physical Education, Duke University; Wendy Windsor, CRSS, Director, Campus Recreation, Tulane University

Do race and gender matter in recreation? This session will explore the career pathways of four black females and their journeys becoming directors in campus recreation. The discussion will focus on the unique challenges and obstacles these black women faced to become directors. it will also deliver a framework for success.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the unique challenges and obstacles experienced by black women in the collegiate recreation field.
  • Develop an understanding of women in leadership and how gender impacts the role of campus recreation director.
  • Identify strategies implemented by black women for professional development and professional advancement.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 124 AB

Victoria Lopez-Herrera, Senior Associate Director, The University of Texas at San Antonio; Belinda Sanchez, Student, Texas A & M University- Commerce; Guadalupe Aguila, Universidad Tecmilenio; Carlos Gerardo Ordóñez Pérez

Campuses are a critical part of larger community ecosystems. Campus wellbeing efforts can – and even have a responsibility to – act as a catalyst for transformation of the cities and communities around them. Hear representatives from Mexico’s Tecmilenio and Tec de Monterrey discuss how their campuses have strategized to impact their communities and encourage all to flourish.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe strategies used by campuses around the globe to implement an integrated and holistic approach to wellbeing for their campus community.
  • Understand the impact of not only the campus on the community, but also the community on the campus when considering holistic wellbeing.
  • Assess the challenges and opportunities while implementing such an ecosystem, considering the many stakeholders’ voices.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 124 AB

Victoria Lopez-Herrera, Senior Associate Director, The University of Texas at San Antonio; Belinda Sanchez, Student, Texas A & M University- Commerce; Guadalupe Aguila, Universidad Tecmilenio; Carlos Gerardo Ordóñez Pérez

The wellbeing of the campus community is critical to student success and achieving the mission of higher education. This perspective is shared by leading institutions around the globe. Hear from two universities who have taken wellbeing integration efforts to the next level by creating ecosystems, inclusive of all campus stakeholders. Representatives from Mexico’s Tecmilenio and Tec de Monterrey discuss their ‘why’, how they demonstrate success, and how they overcome challenges for this work. ::

Learning Objectives
  • Describe strategies used by campuses around the globe to implement an integrated and holistic approach to wellbeing for their campus community.
  • Understand the impact of championing upstream approaches to wellbeing for the campus community.
  • Articulate why campuses around the globe are leaning into this work.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 122 A-C

Brooke Turner, Associate Director of Programs, The University of Alabama; Steve Bobbitt, Associate Director for Programming, James Madison University; Aaron Hobson, Associate Director of Facility Operations, University of Florida; Victoria Lopez-Herrera, Senior Associate Director, The University of Texas at San Antonio

This panel discussion seeks to help current associate directors build their skills, knowledge, and capacity. Learn from the perspectives of the director as well as from fellow associate directors as you start to master managing in the middle.

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management • Business Management

Learning Objectives
  • Examine varying strategies for achieving organizational and personal success as an associate director.
  • Articulate some best practices for middle managers.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 125 AB

Presentation coordinated by NIRSA’s Health and Wellbeing Task Force

George Brown, PhD,RCRSP, CRSS, Assistant Vice Provost and Director of University Recreation and Wellness, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; Darcie Burde, Associate Director, University of Florida; Stacy Connell, SLC Wellbeing, LLC; Shannon DuPree, DHSc, CHES,CWP,HWC, Director of Wellness, North Carolina State University at Raleigh; Marci Iverson, RCRSP, Director of Campus Recreation & Leadership, Viterbo University; Karina Knutson, University of North Dakota; Dax Kuykendall, The University of Texas At Arlington

The NIRSA Health & Wellbeing Task Force has been busy this past year: assessing the membership on the state of wellbeing in collegiate recreation, gathering input at the Regional Conferences, and now starting to develop the tangibles that you have asked for! Join the task force as we discuss our progress and learnings thus far, share what’s coming next, and how YOU can be part of the process!

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Philosophy and Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Summarize the current work of the Health & Wellbeing Task Force.
  • Identify opportunities to engage with the Task Force working groups.
  • Identify opportunities to engage with the Task Force working groups.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 122 A-C

James Braam, Senior Principal, Director Recreation Wellness, HOK; Julie Kipper, Executive Director, Tempe Campus, Arizona State University; Dustin Soderman, Associate Director-Facilities & Operations, Arizona State University

This lively panel discussion takes place seven years after Arizona State University opened four different recreation centers on four different campuses simultaneously. This discussion will bring the former and current recreation directors together to talk about how the projects, programming, and people have evolved over time. Lessons learned will provide a valuable jumping off point for an in-depth conversation about how recreation directors can adapt and grow their facilities after the new paint smell wears off.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Facility Management, Planning & Design

Learning Objectives
  • Identify opportunities to incorporate and respond to key wellness trends using features of your existing facility.
  • Respond to and leverage new programming opportunities within your spaces.
  • State the specific needs of your student body and how your facility can support that student body.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 125 AB

Jarrell Garcia, Assistant Director for Operations, University of California-Santa Barbara; Yvette Kell, CRSS, PhD, Director of Campus Recreation, CENTERS, LLC At University of Missouri-St Louis; Megan Krone, PhD., Executive Director of Academic Coaching and Editing, Heartful Editor; Gabby McCollum, Ed.D, Assistant Director of Operations and Risk Management, Virginia Tech; Gregory Michael Reinhardt, Manager, Student Leadership & Development, University of Utah

The decision to pursue a doctoral degree is an exciting, daunting, beneficial, and life-changing decision that only approximately 2% of Americans attain. “What’s up Doc? Making the Decision to Pursue your Doctorate Degree”; is an open panel discussion with current professionals who are doctoral candidates, recent grads, and experienced recipients of these prestigious degrees. This session will give attendees the opportunity to ask the burning question; “is the juice worth the squeeze?”

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Determine whether pursuing a doctoral degree is something that will contribute to your professional and personal goals.
  • Have a better idea of the applicability of attaining a doctoral degree within the field of collegiate recreation.
  • Evaluate and identify different doctoral programs that may be a perfect fit for your career.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 122 A-C

Stefani Plummer, Director-Rec Center, California Baptist University; Elisabeth Henry, Associate Director of Recreation, Engagement, University of California-San Diego; Tiffany Lomax, Associate Director of Wellness, Recreation and Campus Events, Delaware State University; A’Naja Newsome, RCRSP, Assistant Director, Fitness & Wellness, University of South Florida; Staci Snyder, North Zone Venue Manager, UCLA; Jill Sturts, PhD, Assistant Professor of Recreation and Leisure Studies, Virginia Wesleyan University

This panel is a time to hear successful women share their unique stories. Attendees will be able to hear the paths of different professionals and see different management styles. Since there is no “one way” to be successful, come see how others have made their journey their own. This is a time of inspiration and encouragement to see share commonalities and path differences, and how they relate to your own personal journey through the recreation profession.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Identify different career paths women in NIRSA have taken.
  • Craft a definition of “successful” that applies to your career path.
  • Identify a leadership style that you can relate to.

1.5 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-9:30 am    Room 122 A-C

Vicki Highstreet, RCRSP, Associate Director, University of Nebraska; Karen David, University of Dayton; Linda Knight, College of William and Mary; Demitri Lahanas, Arizona State University; Suzanne Ries, Florida Gulf Coast University; Andrea Snead, Assistant Director, Recreation & Wellness Center, University of Central Florida

Presented by the NIRSA Assembly, this session is a panel discussion about Generation Z (born 1997 onward) and its impact on collegiate recreation (Dimock, 2019). This session will feature various NIRSA professionals and showcase multiple points of view. The Assembly aims to engage professionals in thoughtful consideration of the opportunities presented by this generation as they attend our institutions and enter our workforce.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Human Resources Management • Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Explain the qualities and characteristics of Gen Z and how these individuals will have a direct impact on collegiate recreation.
  • Identify 2-3 strategies for leveraging the collective strengths of a multi-generation staff into effective leadership and management within your organization.
  • Identify 2-3 ways you can leverage the strengths and opportunities of Gen Z at your institution and in the workplace over the next 5-10 years.

1.5 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-9:30 am    Room 125 AB

Laura Whiteley, Assistant Director, Competitive Sports & Facilities, University of the Pacific; Melissa Bates, Assistant Director of Campus Recreation Programming, Southern Oregon University; Megan Choiniere, Coordinator of Member Services, Oakland University; Victoria Roberts, Associate Director, Member Services & Aquatics, Clemson University; Taylor Schiller, Membership Services Manager, Virginia Tech

This panel discussion will focus on key aspects of membership services in collegiate recreation including customer service, student staff training and supervision, and assessment/member satisfaction and retention. This presentation will cover different aspects, capabilities, and resources of member management technologies. The panelists will use their different levels of experience to discuss and explain challenges and successes of membership services at their respective institutions. What is membership services you ask? Well, let’s chat about it!

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Business Management • Human Resources Management • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Discuss current practices and identify new ideas related to improving membership student staff training.
  • Discuss best practices of member management technologies, including the use of software such as Innosoft Fusion and RecTrac.
  • Identify and learn from different successes and challenges that professionals across the field currently face.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-9:30 am    Room 124 AB

James Nash, Associate Director – Facilities, Texas A & M University-College Station; Sikirat Kazeem, Associate Director, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Mark Munguia, Director of Programs, The University of Texas at Austin; Laura Thomas, Assistant Director, Competitive Sports, The University of Alabama

In the first ten years of their careers, campus rec professionals have few opportunities to openly discuss their career needs and concerns or to receive expert advice from experienced professionals. This panel of seasoned rec sports professionals will offer much-needed coaching and advice. Panelists will share their “truths” and provide you with career coaching, tips, and advice to help you manage better as a professional. Understanding more about yourself and your environment, as well as your decision-making processes, is important as you continue along your career trajectory.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Gain insights into how to navigate your campus recreation culture.
  • Develop your own strategies for personal and professional success.
  • Describe barriers that may prevent you from developing professionally.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 226 A-C

Discuss best practices and emerging trends in aquatics

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 226 A-C

Leah Hall Dorothy, CRSS, PhD, Director, Recreational Sports, Oregon State University; Kristy Caldwell, CRSS, Associate Director, Texas State University; David Davenport, Director & Chief Diversity Officer, Austin Peay State University; Jocelyn Hill, Director of Recreational Sports & Fitness, American University; Derek Hottell, PhD, Director of Recreational Sports, Virginia Commonwealth University; Cara Lucia, PhD, Associate Professor, Elon University

Join the NIRSA Board for a roundtable discussion about opportunities and challenges in campus recreation. The NIRSA Board is dedicated to ongoing environmental scanning in a variety of formats. Engaging students and professionals in real-time conversation at NIRSA events is one of their valuable scanning tools. Come ready to share your observations and ideas with the NIRSA Board to help inform their decisions as they strategically lead NIRSA to advocate for, and advance the profession in higher education.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 223

Featured presentation from Canada

Tanya Angus, Director Recreation Services, University of Manitoba; Judith Owusuaah, IM Assistant – Special Events, York University; Jason Wright, Programmer, Sports Clubs, Martial Arts, Racquet Sports & Special Events, University of Victoria

Canadian regional leaders will lead a roundtable discussion of current trends, opportunities and challenges that Canadian members are facing on their campuses. Join in the discussion to support Canadian institutions as we continue to work together to keep your campus on the leading edge of campus recreation.

Learning Objectives
  • tbd

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 226 A-C

Coordinated by NIRSA Esports Task Force

Laura Klein, CRSS, Director, University of North Texas; Chris Allison, CEO, Geex, Inc.; Matt Grimm, RCRSP, Assistant Athletic Director, Campus Recreation, Stevenson University; David Kirk, Esports Program Director, Illinois State University; Garrett Larson, Competitive Sports Coordinator, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

Discuss best practices and emerging trends related to Esports.

1.5 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-9:30 am    Room 226 A-C

Discuss best practices and emerging trends related to facility management.

   Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 226 A-C

Discuss best practices and emerging trends related to fitness.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 226 A-C

Coordinated by NIRSA’s Health and Wellbeing Task Force

Stacy Connell, SLC Wellbeing, LLC; George Brown, PhD,RCRSP, CRSS, Assistant Vice Provost and Director of University Recreation and Wellness, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; Marci Iverson, RCRSP, Director of Campus Recreation & Leadership, Viterbo University; Karina Knutson, University of North Dakota; Dax Kuykendall, The University of Texas At Arlington

Integrated health and wellbeing is more than a program or a trend. It’s about creating a culture where the university community can thrive. Join the conversation as we discuss hot topics in health and wellbeing, how collegiate recreation adds value, and best practices that can drive success in this exciting field. Join us for facilitated small group discussions on various health and wellbeing topics. This presentation will empower members to create successful campus partnerships to provide programs and services that enhance student success.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Tuesday, April 21: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 226 A-C

Discuss best practices and emerging trends intramural sports.

   Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 226 A-C

Discuss best practices and emerging trends related to marketing.

   Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 226 A-C

Discuss best practices and emerging trends related to outdoor recreation.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 226 A-C

Discuss best practices and emerging trends related to risk management.

   Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 226 A-C

Coordinated by NIRSA’s Small Programs Advisory Council

Lisa Caldwell, Florida SouthWestern State College; Andrew Doyle, RCRSP, Coordinator of Recreation, Southern New Hampshire University; Marc Falkenstein, RCRSP, Director, Pacific Recreation, University of the Pacific; Rachael Finley, Director of Campus Recreation, York College of Pennsylvania; Mila Padgett, Director, Campus Recreation and Wellness, University of South Carolina Aiken; Alicia Rossow, RCRSP, Director of Wellness, Florida Southern College; Ann Storey, Sheridan College

Discuss best practices and emerging trends related to small programs.

1.0 NIRSA CEUs    Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 226 A-C

Discuss best practices and emerging trends related to sport clubs.

   Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Chad Nelson, Assistant Professor, TAMU; Gary Ellis, Professor and Bradberry Chair, TAMU; Jingxian Jiang, Research Assistant Professor, TAMU

Action ball is fast-paced new sport combining the skills and tactics of soccer and ultimate Frisbee. It is quickly gaining popularity as an intramural sport program. Quality intramural sport offerings are physically intense and psychologically immersive. We will describe action ball and summarize an experiment we conducted. We tested the energy expenditure and immersive quality of subjective experiences of university students during action ball, basketball, and ultimate Frisbee competitions.

Knowledge Level

Foundational

Core Competencies

Programming • Research & Evaluation • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the rules and history of action ball.
  • Summarize the prevalence and growth of action ball as an intramural sport program.
  • Summarize the evidence that researchers have for their claim that action ball is “equivalent” to basketball and ultimate frisbee in terms of energy expenditure and quality of subjective experience.

   Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Tyler Spencer, Assistant Professor, Saint Ambrose University; Clint Jones, Associate Director of Campus Recreation, St. Edward’s University

This study investigated the current practices of campus recreation practitioners to create inclusive campus recreation programs, services, and facilities specifically for people with disabilities. The data collected helps to develop strategies to create a more inclusive environment for campus recreation administrators to better meet the needs and desires of patrons with disabilities.

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Philosophy & Theory • Facility Management, Planning & Design

Learning Objectives
  • Demonstrate an understanding of critical disability theory and universal design.
  • Describe how the current inclusive climate within campus recreation is for people with disabilities.
  • Conduct an examination of how your current facilities, services, and programs meet the needs and desires of people with disabilities.

   Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Sandy Nguyen, Research Graduate Assistant in the Recreation, Events and Sports Management Program, University of North Texas; John Collins, PhD, Associate Professor, University of North Texas

Discover why the Sport Motivation Scale and Intrinsic Motivation Inventory are instruments that can help you determine how collegiate rugby participants perceive their experience in recreational sport and competition! Hear how the results of this anticipated study may reveal a new lens on how administrators can foresee the opportunities to better improve sport clubs: moral, increase sport participation, team cohesion, and provide more support for their sport club teams. The rising popularity of collegiate rugby as we know it, may help us all better understand the demographic variables, and may be the inaugural results for the comparison of the SMS and IMI in athlete-student development and student affairs across the nation. Let’s get all college rugby teams in the US to participate in this research study, NIRSA!

Knowledge Level

Strategic

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Summarize the sport motivation scale’s psychometrics.
  • Explain impact of rugby on the collegiate player from a motivational perspective.
  • Define what the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory Scale as it relates to recreational sports.

   Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Kimberly Rottet, Ed.D., Director, University Recreation, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

This program will present the research from the presenter dissertation, focusing on the development practices of professionals seeking advancement to department senior leadership positions within collegiate recreation.

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management

Learning Objectives
  • Recall the NIRSA competencies through discussion of the research.
  • Identify potential competency themes from your own professional experiences through discussion of the research.
  • Identify competencies and skill sets to use in your own continued development journey.

   Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Lindsey Oakes, M.S., LRT/CTRS, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Public Health Education, University of North Carolina Greensboro; Jeffrey Milroy, Assistant Professor, UNC Greensboro

This presentation will outline the findings from a research project funded by Special Olympics Unified Sports. The purpose of this study was to examine collegiate recreation and sports experiences of students with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (IDD) and explore the experiences of collegiate recreation and sports staff who serve students with IDD. The intent of this research was to gain a better understanding of how college students with IDD are, desire to be, and can be meaningfully included within collegiate recreation and sports. With there being over 260 inclusive post-secondary education (IPSE) programs across the country that are specifically designed for college students with IDD, the numbers of college students with IDD are growing. This presentation will provide you with insights related to the inclusion of college students with IDD in campus recreation and sports. This presentation will also provide you with background information that reveals the relevance and timely nature of this research, information about our research methods, and a review of findings from our study.

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Programming • Philosophy & Theory

Learning Objectives
  • Define and identify true and meaningful social inclusion of students with IDD within campus recreation and sports.
  • Describe the importance of including students with IDD within campus recreation and sports.
  • List findings from our research study and describe implications for their own practice.

   Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 224 B

NIRSA Research Grant Recipient. This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Laura Morris, EdD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina Wilmington; Danny Twilley, PhD, Assistant Dean, West Virginia University

College students self-rated emotional health is at an all-time low and is highly correlated with feeling depressed (Egan et al., 2014). The increase in students lack of emotional wellbeing is problematic for colleges as students with lower levels of emotional health lack a sense of belonging on campus and are less satisfied with college (Higher Education Research Institute, 2014). Thus, college students are a specific population that could benefit from increased happiness. To examine psychological wellbeing and happiness of campus recreation participants, researchers surveyed students at two universities. With college students being the focus, this research hopes to provide a better understanding of the connection between leisure and happiness in preparing students to live productive and satisfying lives. In the session, researchers will share their findings.

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Philosophy & Theory • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Define psychological wellbeing.
  • List three outcomes of the study.
  • Describe how study outcomes may impact your programming area.

   Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 224 B

NIRSA Research Grant Recipient. This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Austin Anderson, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Southern Indiana; Eric Knee, Assistant Professor, Adelphi University; William Ramos, Indiana University- Bloomington

This session will present results of a study funded by the NIRSA Research Grant Program. The study investigates the impact of diversity training on attitudes and competencies of student and professional campus recreation employees. This study begins to address the nature of the diversity training process within campus recreation and its efficacy in developing student and professional workers who are better able to create open and inviting recreational environments for participants.

Core Competencies

Personal & Professional Qualities • Human Resources Management • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Participants will be able to describe the importance of research-based projects in evaluating the efficacy and impact of educational initiatives/training for student and professional staff.
  • Participants will be able to identify areas of strength/weakness of conventional staff training mechanisms.
  • Participants will have a greater understanding of the importance of diversity training around LGBTQ issues in campus recreation and their ability to implement such training.

   Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Jacob Eubank, EdD, Assistant Professor – Recreation Education & Therapy, CUNY Lehman College

Are you noticing an increased number of older students visiting your facilities? What about in your programs? In recent years, the number of non-traditional college students has been growing, and is estimated at 6.8 million. Non-traditional students experience college differently from the traditional student in a number of ways. Find out what motivates them to find time for recreational activity and possibly, what might be standing in their way.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Programming • Research & Evaluation • Facility Management, Planning & Design

Learning Objectives
  • Define the characteristics of a non-traditional college student.
  • Recognize various motivations and barriers that non-traditional students experience when participating in physical activity.
  • Design and deliver programs that are both enticing and accessible for non-traditional college students.

   Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Jason Foster, Lecturer – School of Health and Applied Human Sciences, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Student employment should be a vital component of the overall education experience of students, yet as employers and supervisors we are not always intentional about designing these opportunities in a way to best support all aspects of student development. Student employee supervisors have a duty to design employment experiences in a way to support the development of the whole student. This session is based on research through which students shared stories and painted a picture of the way employment in a division of student affairs supported their development as they came to make meaning of their multiple and intersecting identities. This presentation will share findings and help attendees discover ways they can design their employment, training, and development opportunities to better support student identity development.

Knowledge Level

Practical

Core Competencies

Philosophy & Theory • Human Resources Management • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the importance of student employment as an opportunity for holistic student development.
  • Explain the ways student employment support students’ understanding of their intersecting identities.
  • Assess your student employment practices and implement changes to better support student identity development.

   Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Jeffrey Milroy, Assistant Professor, UNC Greensboro

This presentation will describe a study investigating concussion disclosure intentions and behaviors of club sport student-athletes. This presentation makes comparisons between club sport and NCAA student-athletes. The findings of this study will generate meaningful discussion with presentation attendees related to effective concussion reporting programming specifically designed for club sport student-athletes.

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation • Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Describe intrapersonal factors related to the concussion disclosure intentions of club sport athletes.
  • Employ effective strategies to motivate club sport athletes to disclose symptoms of a potential concussion.

   Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 224 B

NIRSA Research Grant Recipient. This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Erin Patchett, CRSS,RCRSP, Director, Administration and Assessment, Colorado State University-Fort Collins

This presentation will provide an overview of the results of a study funded by the NIRSA Research Grant Program. Collegiate recreation professionals (CRPs) play a large role in the offering of programs, facilities, and services to a college campus. Some research findings suggest that those offerings are not reaching all communities on the college campus – specifically participants with marginalized identities. The purpose of this dissertation study was to understand the role of the CRP in creating equitable and inclusive recreation opportunities. The research questions included 1) how do CRPs conceptualize diversity and inclusion, 2) how do CRPs engage in diversity and inclusion in their roles, 3) what factors influence CRPs’ engagement in diversity and inclusion efforts, and 4) what are the perceived outcomes of that engagement? Findings and implications will be discussed.

Core Competencies

Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Identify factors which influence campus recreation professionals to engage in diversity and inclusion efforts.

   Monday, April 20: 2:00 pm-2:30 pm    Room 222 A

Mike Ackerman, Associate Director, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Collegiate Recreation and Wellness departments and programs are poised to make a significant impact with preparing our student employees for their career transition after college. Our departments employee large numbers of students and with the right preparation we can help our students better articulate the skills they are gaining in collegiate recreation and how they are transferable to their future careers by better utilizing National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) career readiness competencies. This presentation will provide assessment strategies and other opportunities to incorporate NACE competencies into your department.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe NACE competencies and their importance to the student employment experience.
  • Articulate transferable skills in collegiate recreation employment that align with the NACE Career Competencies.
  • Develop NACE assessment strategies to implement with student employees.

   Monday, April 20: 11:30 am-noon    Room 221 C

Ty Verdin, Senior Coordinator of Club Sports, Kennesaw State University

This presentation will provide an overview on the importance of transferable skills. Specifically how to best use these skills for current and future roles.

Learning Objectives
  • Identify transferable skills to apply to current and future job positions.

   Monday, April 20: 10:00 am-10:30 am    Room 222 A

Todd Bowyer, RCRSP, Director of Campus Recreation, Roanoke College

The job search can be frustrating, especially when call backs seem few and far between. While writing your resume and cover letter is not always the easiest thing to do, it is often your first chance to make an impression on your desired employer. In this session you will learn how to write an effective cover letter and professional resume to improve the chances your application gets noticed by the hiring manager or search committee.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the steps of the job search and hiring processes.
  • Identify the essential components of a cover letter including the desired content within the body paragraphs.
  • Develop resume format and appropriate content that captures both responsibilities and achievements.

   Monday, April 20: 12:30 pm-1:00 pm    Room 221 C

Bryce Starr, RCRSP, Coordinator of Fitness and Wellness, University of Houston-Clear Lake

You finally obtained your dream job, but now you are encountering some set backs and obstacle. You are not alone! Let’s break down how to navigate those typical struggles of the first year professional.

Learning Objectives
  • Discuss the typical experiences of a first-year professional and learn how to be successful.
  • Discuss situations currently occurring on your campus and receive advice in an open and safe group setting.
  • Describe how to successfully navigate the first 365 days.

   Monday, April 20: 1:30 pm-2:00 pm    Room 221 C

Lauren Martini Olson, Associate Director of Campus Recreation, Programs, University of South Carolina-Columbia

Job searching can be overwhelming but that feeling isn’t over once you have an offer. There is a lot to consider when applying for and accepting (or denying) jobs. This presentation will describe the average job search & interview process, identify additional benefits to be aware of (and how to find out more).

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the average job search and interview process utilized by most NIRSA institutions.
  • Identify at least five additional job benefits besides salary.
  • Articulate questions to ask potential employers regarding additional job benefits.

   Monday, April 20: 1:00 pm-1:30 pm    Room 222 A

Stephen Putnam, RCRSP, Director, Garrett College

The title Small Programs Big Careers says it all. You will experience more, have greater responsibilities, and advance faster working in a small program. The long standing bias that small programs are the “minor leagues” of campus recreation is so far from the truth. So come see how you can fast track your career in campus recreation as Small Program All Star.

Learning Objectives
  • Create informed, fair, and equitable decisions about working at a small program.
  • Describe the career opportunities and variety of experiences you can gain by working at a small program.

   Monday, April 20: noon-12:30 pm    Room 222 A

Matthew Collum, Member Services and Operations Coordinator, Boston College

IF YOU ARE READING THIS, YOU ARE ALREADY ON THE RIGHT TRACK!!! Trademark Yourself ™ is the presentation that is going to help open your eyes to the best things to keep in mind when marketing your personality and your abilities, while providing real world examples to back up the research and information on creating one’s own personal brand. If you have been wondering what to focus on for that dreaded “elevator pitch” or just how to promote yourself without even saying anything in particular, join us for this presentation!

Learning Objectives
  • Promote yourself verbally, physically, and through various actions (appearance, personality, relationships, etc.).
  • Explain the five key points of personal branding to be able to concentrate your efforts when working on your “trademark.”
  • List up to five celebrities/companies and the ways that they promote themselves, which will help you figure out the best way to foster growth in yourself.

   Monday, April 20: 9:30 am-10:00 am    Room 221 C

Courtney Copp, Member Services Coordinator, University of Arizona; Laura Whiteley, Assistant Director, Competitive Sports & Facilities, University of the Pacific

Everything up until now has prepared you to boost your resume and for the interview, you’ve landed the job, now what? Transitioning from a graduate student or a part time role to a full time professional has both ups and downs. Learn from the lessons and perspectives of new professionals, their mistakes, and things they wish they had known starting their careers.

Learning Objectives
  • Identify common challenges faced by first-year professionals in a new work environment or transitioning out of a part-time role.
  • Avoid common mistakes in your first year as a professional.

   Saturday, April 18: 1:00 pm-4:30 pm    West 301 A Ballroom

Search and apply for jobs in recreation, submit your resume for review by our team of experts, or practice your interviewing skills. Employers will host informational sessions about open positions in rooms 221C and 222A, and mini-sessions on a variety of career-building topics will be presented in 222A and 222B. Check in at the CSC for details.

   Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-10:15 am    West 301 A Ballroom

Search and apply for jobs in recreation, submit your resume for review by our team of experts, or practice your interviewing skills. Employers will host informational sessions about open positions in rooms 221C and 222A, and mini-sessions on a variety of career-building topics will be presented in 222A and 222B. Check in at the CSC for details.

   Sunday, April 19: 2:30 pm-5:00 pm    West 301 A Ballroom

Search and apply for jobs in recreation, submit your resume for review by our team of experts, or practice your interviewing skills. Employers will host informational sessions about open positions in rooms 221C and 222A, and mini-sessions on a variety of career-building topics will be presented in 222A and 222B. Check in at the CSC for details.

   Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-5:00 pm    West 301 A Ballroom

Search and apply for jobs in recreation, submit your resume for review by our team of experts, or practice your interviewing skills. Employers will host informational sessions about open positions in rooms 221C and 222A, and mini-sessions on a variety of career-building topics will be presented in 222A and 222B. Check in at the CSC for details.

   Tuesday, April 21: 8:00 am-2:00 pm    West 301 A Ballroom

Search and apply for jobs in recreation, submit your resume for review by our team of experts, or practice your interviewing skills. Employers will host informational sessions about open positions in rooms 221C and 222A, and mini-sessions on a variety of career-building topics will be presented in 222A and 222B. Check in at the CSC for details.

   Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focusing on Infusing Health & Wellbeing.

Rheese Vasko, Vice President of Operation, Shake Smart

Is your facility maximizing its opportunities to achieve complete physical wellness for students? While most campus recreation centers excel in promoting the importance of exercise as a component of physical wellness, many are lacking an equally important factor: Nutrition. Learn how to enhance your wellness initiatives through different opportunities to make healthy eating options quick and easy for students within the college recreation center.

Learning Objectives
  • Assess the current offerings of your wellbeing initiatives and recognize if good nutrition has a noticeable presence and proper guidance within your facility.
  • Determine how to make improvements or provide more direction with your current eatery offerings.
  • Decide how to integrate nutrition in your unique situation and how to collaborate and provide students with a resource for nutritionally sound food options.

   Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

David Larson, Senior Vice President, TMP Architecture, Inc.; Tim Casai, President, TMP Architecture, Inc.

Why is my fitness center so loud? Though acoustics may not be the first thing to consider when joining a new fitness facility, it certainly has a significant impact on the user experience. When excessive background noise and reverberation are not addressed, it becomes challenging to provide multi-modal, technology-infused, and flexible fitness and recreation spaces. In order to accommodate evolving trends and the changing needs of users, it is important to address how acoustics impact the space and to consider the effects on the environment. Practical and effective acoustical design is essential to supporting the user in the activities throughout the space. Join us as we present innovative design approaches and considerations to mitigate sound and control acoustics.

Learning Objectives
  • Discuss the considerations and applications of acoustical design in fitness/recreation centers.
  • Apply innovative design approaches to mitigate sound and control acoustics

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Campus Collaborations.

Caitlin Sommers, Assistant Director-Sport Clubs and Intramurals, Western Washington University

Sexual Assault and Dating Violence are constantly in the news, how are we are working towards creating violence free communities? Hear how we have create collaborative trainings at WWU.

Learning Objectives
  • Incorporate NIRSA’s endorsement of the NCAA Sexual Assault and Violence Prevention Tool Kit into sport clubs trainings.
  • Identify collaborative partners on campus working towards creating a violence free community
  • Articulate the importance of Sexual Assault and Violence Prevention training within the Sport Clubs community

   Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Risk Management.

Jared Ginter, SportRisk and Trinity Western University

Developing an effective concussions management plan can be complex and time consuming. This presentation outlines a simple stepwise process to create a plan based on your available resources, and needs of your institution.

Learning Objectives
  • Determine how to audit your current concussions management plan.
  • Explain importance of concussion protocols and how to access them
  • List the elements of an effective concussions training program for participants and staff.

   Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 224 B

This will be one of multiple presentations during this time focused on Staff Development

Stephanie Souvenir, Assistant Director of Student Employment and Development, CENTERS, LLC At DePaul University

Want to bring the magic of Disney’s customer service to your facility? So did we! Which is why we created the Core Four, our standards of quality of customer service. Learn about our inspiration, process and watch our training video that we created for onboarding meetings.

Learning Objectives
  • List the basic steps for revamping your customer service training.

   Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focusing on Esports

TBD

   Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Personal & Professional Development.

Kathy Obuszewski, Assistant Manager of Aquatics, Case Western Reserve University

Grittiness is one of the most defining factors that lead to success or failure for potential leaders. We don’t always realize we are truly gritty until life makes us practice it. This 10-minute talk will go through examples of grittiness and ways to become more resilient during times of trouble. This presentation will talk blend theory and the practical experience that I’ve gained in the last year. It will include both positive ways to handle stress and negative ways to handle stress.

Learning Objectives
  • Define grittiness theory.
  • Practice grittiness in their own lives.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Campus Collaborations.

Jim Fitzsimmons, Director, University of Nevada-Reno

Fitness and Counseling Services at our campus have partnered to utilize high intensity exercise and psychotherapy to treat students with anxiety, stress, and depression. This is a pilot study and the design requires the therapist to fully participate in all exercise sessions and the fitness instructor to fully participate in all therapy sessions. Initial results from this pilot study have been dramatic and positive.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the basic physiologic impact high-intensity exercise has on stress, anxiety, and depression.
  • Identify the critical partnerships you need to make on campus to create a similar program.
  • Demonstrate appropriate assessment of the individuals in the program and the program as a whole.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Campus Collaborations.

Juan Liberato, UCLA; Dariela Herrada, Fitwell Consultant, UCLA; Alexandra Nario, Student, UCLA

FITTED is a student-initiated, student-run program designed to raise and retain consciousness of holistic health by providing free fitness and educational services to underrepresented student leaders on the UCLA campus; we do this through the initiation of dialogue between diverse groups, as well as collaboration and partnerships, in order to create a welcoming environment that promotes personal growth and influences them to permanently incorporate the themes of our program as a way of life.

Learning Objectives
  • Target underrepresented populations for participation.
  • Describe how free services can increase overall participation in recreation
  • Summarize ways campus partnerships can be beneficial

   Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Risk Management.

Greg Corack, EdD,RCRSP, Associate Director of Leadership and Programs, East Carolina University; Jennifer Pidgeon, Assistant Director of Athletic Training, East Carolina University

Athletic training coverage for recreational sports programs and services is essential to the continued health and safety of participants. This session will provide a framework for starting an in-house athletic training program within recreational sports. Topics include hiring the right staff, facility design/construction, equipment, campus partnerships, medical supervision and site coverage. Attendees will learn the process recently completed at ECU and determine what steps they can take to bring this important service to their campus.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the minimum elements necessary to develop an athletic training facility.
  • Identify at least three partners on campus/in the community to engage when starting an athletic training program.
  • Review current risk management practices to determine the programs or services that will benefit from ATC sideline coverage.

   Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Esports

Cybbi Barton, Program Manager – Club Sports & Esports, University of Michigan; Lexi Chaput, Senior Assistant Director, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; Laurel Hanna, Assistant Director, Club Sports & Camps, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

When our peers are charged with creating a space for esports, we often hear “I’m not an expert with esports.” By attending this session, you will leave with the tools to begin your quest of being the expert for your campus.

Core Competencies

Programming

Learning Objectives
  • Execute strategies on your campus to create an esports program.
  • Identify the key stakeholders on your campus and external stakeholders to optimize your resources.

   Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Risk Management.

Marcus Wirth, Building Services and Risk Management, University of Colorado Boulder; Luna Boydstun, Weightroom Supervisor and Group Fitness Instructor, University of Colorado Boulder

February 7th, 2019. 5:30pm. For some people at the University of Colorado Student Recreation Center, this date and time will not be soon forgotten. While sitting in my office talking our Facility Supervisor another student employee radioed, “IMs to Fac Sup we have an injured patron in the Turf Gym.” As the Facility Supervisor arrived on the scene they quickly learned this wasn’t just a minor injury such as a rolled ankle or bruised knee. A student playing soccer in our turf gym had suddenly collapsed, wasn’t moving, wasn’t breathing and began to turn blue. This presentation will elaborate on the minute by minute timeline of the steps taking by the University of Colorado Recreation Services staff to save this student’s life. This presentation will focus on what the University of Colorado Recreation Services did before, during and after a student went into cardiac arrest in our facility.

Core Competencies

Legal Liabilities & Risk Management • Personal & Professional Qualities

Learning Objectives
  • Implement an effective and tested emergency action plan and risk management training’s for student staff
  • Describe steps that need to be quickly executed in saving someone’s life in a medical emergency.
  • List the actions and to take in the days and weeks following a life-threatening emergency in their facility.

   Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Personal & Professional Development.

Kelly Ibele, University of Wyoming

Want to improve your student development practices, but you aren’t quite sure how to do so? This session will go over two practical tools to utilize in student development practices that will help students have a greater sense of self-awareness in regard to their “why,” as well as help students find a deeper sense of purpose in their work.

Learning Objectives
  • Identify two tools that they can utilize to improve student development practices at their institution.
  • Conduct two activities in relation to student development.

   Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Infusing Health & Wellbeing.

Christopher Morris, CRSS, Director of Campus Recreation, Florida State University; Laura Morris, EdD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina Wilmington

The term “Blue Zone” was first conceptualized by Dr. Pes and Dr. Poulain, who studied longevity, and circled with blue ink the locations on a map with unusually high numbers of Centenarians. Dan Buettner, traveled to each of the Blue Zones to uncover the predominant lifestyles of these individuals, finding nine lessons for living longer (Buettner, 2012). Learn how two campuses are implementing these evidence-based practices to continue the challenge of improving health, wellbeing, and longevity.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe five lessons for longer living.
  • Identify ways to incorporate Blue Zone lessons into campus programs.

   Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Staff Development.

Rachael Finley, Director of Campus Recreation, York College of Pennsylvania

Small Programs traditionally have limited resources, yet we are frequently asked to do more with the same or fewer resources. Thinking creatively about our skill sets, work load, and the resources we DO have can be the key to maximizing our time. This showcase session highlights a few suggestions that have worked for professionals at small institutions that also created development opportunities for students.

Learning Objectives
  • Identify at least two new ways to use student employees in ways you may not have before.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Campus Collaborations.

Dhalia Bumbaca, Adventure Trip Leader, University of South Floirda; Natalie Galeano, Adventure Trip Leader, University of South Florida – Outdoor Recreation

Presenting Puerto Rico – A week long interdepartmental service and adventure trip offered through the University of South Florida’s Adventure Abroad Program. Do you want to learn more about ways in which your organization can pair civic engagement and leadership with outdoor recreation? If so, come learn about USF’s Puerto Rico Service Trip that has promoted challenge by choice, and is continuing to grow an expand on community relationships both on campus and abroad.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the importance of developing relationships with campus partners in order to better communicate ideas and information to diverse audiences and develop communication skills by speaking on lived experience.
  • Recognize the benefits of campus collaborations and the power in an interdisciplinary approach to outdoor education.
  • Develop personal models for an immersive service and adventure experience within their respective organizations

   Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Esports

Matt Hogg, Regional Vice President of Education and Sales, Brock International, Brock International; Carson Fenwick, Graduate Assistant of Intramurals and Sport Clubs, University of Nevada-Las Vegas; Milo Ocampo, President 8 Bit Esports at UNLV, University of Nevada-Las Vegas; Zachary Wallace, Graduate Assistant for Sport Clubs and Intramurals, University of Nevada-Las Vegas

Ready Player 1?1 Press Play! Esports leagues are more prominent than ever and the people have spoken. Esports Teams and Clubs have been popping up across the nation. Over 20 schools have Division 1 Esports teams with hundreds following behind with Sport Clubs and lower division competition. In this presentation, you will learn how valuable an Esports program at any level can benefit your campus from testimonies and our own experience, and how easy and cost-effective it is to start an Esports league at your school.

Core Competencies

Programming • Facility Management, Planning & Design

Learning Objectives
  • Describe esports and their benefits to your community and university.
  • Share the expansion of an emerging market that can increase participation in your community and university.

   Tuesday, April 21: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Profitable Partnerships

Rachael Finley, Director of Campus Recreation, York College of Pennsylvania

“We are Campus Rec professionals, not Sexual Assault Prevention and Education professionals, right? Wrong. Sexual Assault Prevention and Education can be everyones job, especially ours. Learn how partnering with the right people on campus can have a huge effect on the campus culture and the value of campus recreation.”

   Tuesday, April 21: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Profitable Partnerships

Andrew Doyle, RCRSP, Coordinator of Recreation, Southern New Hampshire University

How many times have you or someone in your program spent hours planning a program just to find our another department put on the same event the week before yours was scheduled to go up? Lean about one school’s attempt to help bring campus partners together in order to better plan and collaborate on important programs that benefit students with a smaller hit to your budget!

   Tuesday, April 21: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Profitable Partnerships

Mila Padgett, Director, Campus Recreation and Wellness, University of South Carolina Aiken

Partnerships are crucial for universities and can be profitable in financial, educational, and programmatic ways. Profitable partnerships and discuss how to advocate for collaborations across campus and respective communities to enhance the reach of your department. Come to this session to learn from colleagues at other small universities and colleges.

Core Competencies

Programming • Business Management

Learning Objectives
  • Identify partnership opportunities on your campus.
  • Connect with colleagues from other small universities and colleges.

   Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Ted Watson, MJMA; Kavie Toor, Manager Programs/ Instructor

A Client, Architect and PhD Candidate present an engaging case study on the intricacies of planning, design and research in the development of an internationally acclaimed campus Aquatic Centre. Framed by a collection of unique perspectives, this presentation explores the University of British Columbia Aquatic Centre as a gateway facility to participation and wellness on campus. Unpack a series of planning strategies and design shifts to maximize the benefits of health and wellness programming, and learn how the application of on-campus academic research supports the implementation of innovative solutions.

Core Competencies

Facility Management, Planning & Design • Research & Evaluation

Learning Objectives
  • Unpack campus planning strategies that place recreation as the campus gateway, maximizing participation and visibility.
  • Maximize health and wellness benefits through planning, design and research synergies.
  • Apply research, data and metrics to drive health and wellness solutions in support of high-quality environments.

   Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Infusing Health & Wellbeing.

Megan Byas, Student Engagement Coordinator, Dillard University

Learn about Dillard University’s unique approach to campus recreation and fostering a culture of health and wellness at a small, private historically black university in an urban environment.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe why it is important to know when to redefine the meaning of campus recreation at your institution.

   Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focusing on Infusing Health & Wellbeing.

Cynthia Lally, Bellarmine University

This presentation will discuss the development and implementation of an initiative focusing on sleep health. The American Academic of Sleep Medicine shares that “research is increasingly showing that more and more college students are not getting enough sleep, which can have a negative impact on their grades.” Sleepy Knights is a comprehensive initiative promoting sleep health among college students. Come learn how you too can implement a similar initiative around sleep.

Learning Objectives
  • Explain the necessary steps to designing and implementing a sleep health initiative.
  • Describe key components of the Sleepy Knights: Healthy Sleep Initiative.
  • Describe the opportunities and challenges of implementing this initiative on your own campus.

   Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Sabina Saksena, CEO, Cytilife

Smart Rec Centers provide automated real time data and predictive insights that can transform student fitness experience, empower students to make smarter choices, and Rec Center Staff to make smarter decisions on better targeted services, operational effciency and investments, with minimal effort.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe what a smart rec renter is and its transformative, multifaceted benefits.
  • Describe the benefits of real time data and predicitve data in driving smarter choices and decision for students and Rec Center Staff, respectively.
  • List the steps they would have to take within Rec Center Department to become a Smart Rec Center

   Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time.

Adam Bastjan, Project Architect, Kahler Slater Architects, Inc.

Learn how to leverage the latest technology in design to envision the future of collegiate recreation. This session will demonstrate how versatile tools such as 3D interactive modeling, live rendering and Virtual Reality can help facilitate better discussions and decision-making, maximize your budget and deliver the best possible design solutions for your renovation or new building project.

Learning Objectives
  • Explain how the latest technology tools can allow users to have a real, measurable and positive impact on the outcome of collegiate recreation facility designs.
  • Facilitate better discussions by knowing what questions to ask design teams, which will result in the best possible design solution as well as save time and money.
  • Interact with the technology tools firsthand following the session.

   Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Risk Management.

Kyle Anderson, Assistant Director of Fitness, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

The growth of recreation departments and fitness facilities is more than a trend, it is now the current state of our industry. But a building is just a building. What happens when the building opens and you have to make significant programming changes? When you have to triple the number of certified group exercise instructors and personal trainers? When you want to do more because you have the resources, but you are stuck trying to figure out how to fit the “old way”, into the “new space?” This presentation will focus on the pitfalls, successes, and reflections from a three-year blur of program growth. Attendees will leave with an understanding of what building a new facility means to programmatic expansion and obtain a series of best practices they can apply to their own expansions or growth of programs.

Core Competencies

Programming • Business Management

Learning Objectives
  • Describe three challenges a fitness program may possibly face during rapid expansion.
  • Articulate at least one best practice when preparing for new program expansion.
  • Apply at least one best practice learning from UNC-Greensboro’s experience to a current program.

   Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Personal & Professional Development.

Caroline Dotts, Associate Director- Healthy Lifestyle Programs, Georgia Institute of Technology; Michele Martin, Associate Director Student Wellness & Health Promotion, Georgia Southern University

In the landscape of mental health, workplace burnout is steadily climbing to the top of the charts and campus recreation professionals are not immune. Learn about the signs and symptoms of burnout and discover 5 tips to help you actively avoid burnout at work, no matter your role in your organization.

Learning Objectives
  • Define workplace burnout and recognize the symptoms of burnout.
  • List 3-5 tips they can deploy to mitigate burnout in their workplace.

   Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Staff Development

Christopher Crume, Denison University

Take your onboarding process to the next level with digital tools! No more bored faces in the classroom. No more monotone speeches. Join this interactive discussion about how one program used Google Classroom to evolve their new employee onboarding process and create a better prepared staff. Examples of the material used will be shown. Come prepared with questions!

Learning Objectives
  • List the tools and resources required to set up a digital onboarding program.
  • Discuss with their IT department about technologies available to them to enhance their student learning.

   Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Staff Development.

TJ Hill, Assistant Director – Facilities and Aquatics, Colorado State University-Fort Collins

This presentation will excite and motivate participants with an innovative process to engage students in campus recreation facilities, services, and programs through human-centered design. The presenter will introduce human-centered design and illustrate critical aspects of a successful design for use at your institution.

Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the uses for human-centered design in campus recreation.
  • Identify a challenge that could utilize a human-centered design.
  • Describe the five steps in the Design Thinking process.

   Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Personal & Professional Development.

Matthew Altendorf, Coordinator for Student Staff Training & Development, The Ohio State University

As campus recreation professionals, we know better than most the impact our work has on our campuses. However, if we are to tell the story of the importance of campus recreation, it is imperative we see ourselves as higher education professionals. This presentation will show you how to evaluate your professional identities and opportunities for change on your campus.

Learning Objectives
  • Appreciate the important identity shift we must make from campus recreation professional to higher education professional to be effective on our campuses.
  • Evaluate individual professional practice through CAS and NIRSA standards

   Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 224 B

This will be 1 of multiple presentations during this time focused on Personal & Professional Development.

Dexter Shorter, Associate Director for Competitive Sports & Tennis, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus

Responsibility starts to look different as we experience progress and career advancement in the field of collegiate recreation. Within upper level management of our profession, it is important to continue to remember that leadership is an action, not just a position. Bring your best energy to this showcase to briefly dive into some effective action steps toward being an awesome leader at the Associate Director level and above.

Learning Objectives
  • Demonstrate ways to overcome imposter syndrome while serving in upper-level leadership positions.
  • Activate vulnerable leadership characteristics that encourage a departmental culture of empathy, trust, and safety
  • Build effective relationships with direct reports, varying in experience levels

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Kerri Vasold, Research and Assessment Coordinator, Michigan State University

Are you familiar with stressed out students? We have them too. Stop by to learn results of a new study exploring relationships between participation in campus recreation and anxiety and depression among college students.

Learning Objectives
  • Learn the results from a new study concerning campus recreation and student mental health.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Adam Burke, Assistant Director of Programs, University of Wyoming

The University of Wyoming has revised and updated the student code of conduct and in doing so has created five community standards to which all students will be held accountable. These five community standards are: Community, Respect, Responsibility ,Social Consciousness and Integrity. This poster will communicate how these community standards are being used within the Department of Campus Recreation in addressing conduct/concerns with patrons, participants and student staff.

Learning Objectives
  • Explain a community standards model as it relates to a student code of conduct.
  • Establish how their department can create their own community standards.
  • Discover how a community standards model fundamentally changes conduct conversations.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Dianna Clauss, Director of Recreation Programs, Rider University; Linda Clauss, Assistant Manager, Campus Recreation, California State University-East Bay

Previous research has indicated that many factors contribute to a student’s academic success and a university’s retention rate. Prior research has also demonstrated that students learn through varied delivery methods (i.e. classroom lecture, online, etc.). This presentation will show the preliminary results of ongoing NIRSA Research Grant funded research examining a holistic well-being education program’s hybrid learning design, and how it may contribute to student success and retention.

Learning Objectives
  • Explain the results of this research project to others in their peer circles.
  • Discuss the methodology used in this research project to potentially replicate on their own campus.
  • Apply the hybrid learning model approach used in this research project to their own campus community’s well-being programs.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Nathan Lonngren, Graduate Assistant of Club Sports, University of Arkansas

Learn about how an individuals wellness is enhanced and how it measures up to other club sport athletes through esports.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe how esports raises an individuals wellness

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

John Collins, PhD, Associate Professor, University of North Texas; Sandy Nguyen, Research Graduate Assistant in the Recreation, Events and Sports Management Program, University of North Texas

Rise and shine to a can’t miss presentation why rugby players of all genders like to hit the pitch! The purpose of this research study was to investigate collegiate recreational rugby players’ motivation for playing the game as a means for developing a better understanding as to why they “hit the pitch”. To date, little research has focused on the motivational aspects related to the recreational sport club rugby player in the US. Consequently, this research study was designed to examine the motivation level of the club sport rugby player using the SMS-II as it relates to the number of years having played rugby, starter versus non-starter, level of competition, as well as demographic measures such as age, race, and gender differences. This research is intended to establish a baseline set of data regarding the sport club rugby player in the US, the application of the SMS-II, as well as better understand the complex nature of sport participation for future studies.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the sport motivation scales psychometrics.
  • Summarize the impact of rugby on the collegiate player from a motivational perspective.
  • Gage the social element related to recreational sport club rugby players.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Adebamike Adekunle, Operations-Graduate Assistant, Texas Southern University; Iisha Voltz, Director of Recreation Services, Texas Southern University

As a way of imbibing the culture of wellness in our current society, the Texas Southern University Recreation and Wellness Center incorporated a wellness program in to the Freshmen curriculum. A study was carried out to determine its effects and detriment on student academic performance. The result of the research carried out will be illustrated in a poster.

Learning Objectives
  • Deduce what wellness programs and services can be incorporated into the academic curriculum and how the curriculum affects the outcome of student development.
  • Expand their scopes of wellness programs in their respective academic institutions.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Jason Foster, Lecturer – School of Health and Applied Human Sciences, University of North Carolina Wilmington; Alyssa Henyecz, Student, University of North Carolina Wilmington; Laura Morris, EdD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina Wilmington

With college students indicating higher levels of depression and anxiety, understanding happiness levels may provide an opportunity to counter negative emotions. This study compares subjective happiness levels of NCAA student-athletes and sport club participants at a Division I Southeastern university. As mental health becomes more important on college campuses, understanding the happiness levels of campus recreation participants may be helpful to program administrators.

Learning Objectives
  • Develop a general understanding of subjective wellbeing.
  • Describe the differences in subjective happiness scores between student-athletes and sport club participants.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Brent Beggs, Professor, Illinois State University; Daniel Elkins, PhD, Associate Vice President for Academic Fiscal Management, Illinois State University; Michael Mulvaney, Associate Professor & Recreation and Park Administration Program Director, Illinois State University; Dawn Pote, CRSS, Executive Director, Campus Recreation and Student Fitness Center, Illinois State University

The purpose of this study was to identify the importance that students place on recreation, sports, and healthy lifestyles prior to starting college and how they perceive that will change after college. Students utilizing campus recreation facilities at a Midwestern university were asked to participate in an on-line survey. The findings from this study suggest that students feel that recreation, sports, and healthy lifestyles will not be as important after college.

Learning Objectives
  • Describe the importance of recreation, sports, and healthy lifestyles to students prior to college.
  • Summarize the importance that college students perceive recreation, sports, and healthy lifestyles will have to them after college.
  • Describe the implications of students perceptions that recreation, sports, and healthy lifestyles will be less important to them after college.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Scott Forrester, PhD, Associate Professor Dept of Rec & Leisure Studies, Brock University

This poster will explain why having fun is important in terms of both motivation and attrition, outline the links between fun, and numerous concepts from developmental sport and exercise psychology (e.g., achievement goal theory, competence, ego and task orientation, flow, intrinsic motivation, motivational climate, optimal challenge, and self-determination). The poster will present different strategies for recreational sports professionals to facilitate fun and enjoyable experiences on their campuses.

Learning Objectives
  • Define fun and enjoyment, and realize how fun and enjoyment are interrelated.
  • Explain the links between fun and numerous concepts from developmental sport and exercise psychology.
  • Summarize the different strategies to facilitate fun and enjoyable recreational sport experiences.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Scott Forrester, PhD, Associate Professor Dept of Rec & Leisure Studies, Brock University

This poster introduces the concept of re-positioning to the field of collegiate recreational sports as an important strategy to articulate to key stakeholders within the institution how their facilities, programs, and services add great value to the lives of students and to the institution. Results of a quasi-experimental study examining the effects these re-positioning strategies have on students will also be shared to further demonstrate the utility of re-positioning for the field.

Learning Objectives
  • Define re-positioning and understand its application to collegiate recreational sports.
  • Identify four positioning axioms and four re-positioning strategies.
  • Explain the effects of re-positioning strategies on college students and determine which combination of re-positioning strategies may be most effective on their own campuses.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Estelle Gyimah, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Megan Mottola, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Mental health is often stigmatized, but one cannot have physical health without mental health. Through qualitative and quantitative data, several student experiences are documented to gather an understanding of mental health in regards to fitness. It’s important for student health and well-being that campus recreation, through staff development opportunities, learn how to identify and address mental health. It is also important to collaborate with other departments so students, faculty, and staff feel supported.

Learning Objectives
  • Examine the relationship between mental health and physical health.
  • Describe appropriate ways of addressing mental health in campus recreation.
  • Demonstrate the importance of staff development opportunities and collaborations with other professionals and departments.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Duane Crider, PhD, Professor of Sports Management and Leadership Studies, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania

The purpose of this research was to explore the relationship, if any, between two commonly used strength assessment methods; the traditional push-up and the Hand Dynamometer. The target population was college aged students participating in assessments conducted as part of a college health fair. The researchers attempted to help the students understand that strength assessment need not be complicated in order to be effective. This Poster will present the results of this research.

Learning Objectives
  • Define the specific application of the Push Up and Hand Dynamometer tests for assessing strength.
  • Identify the relationship between Push Ups and Hand Dynamometer for use in assessing strength.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Adrienne Ansel, Fitness Graduate Assistant, Bowling Green State University; Lindsay Rausch, Competitive Sports & Perry Field House Graduate Assistant, Bowling Green State University

Need a survey tool to collect student employee transferrable job skill data? This is the poster session for you! After extensive research in campus recreation literature, analyses of ten currently used survey tools, and feedback from professionals in the field, I worked to create a suggested transferrable job skill survey template for campus recreation professionals at mid-sized universities. Come share your opinions, learn about survey instruments, and develop new ideas for your university!

Learning Objectives
  • Discuss best assessment practices to gather student employees’ transferrable job skills data.
  • Compare survey tools used at your institution and generate ideas for future assessment.
  • Describe the importance and benefit of using assessment to share the campus recreation story.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Adrienne Ansel, Fitness Graduate Assistant, Bowling Green State University; Lindsay Rausch, Competitive Sports & Perry Field House Graduate Assistant, Bowling Green State University

TRX Suspension Training on Functional Mobility and Balance in College-Age Adults is a presentation of a research study conducted by BGSU Kinesiology Master’s students in order to study how fitness assessments can be used in conjunction with small group training within collegiate recreation environments to improve physical fitness and mobility markers.

Learning Objectives
  • Explain the importance of incorporating small group training into fitness programs for college age adults.
  • Describe the physical effects of incorporating TRX Resistance exercises into a fitness regimen.
  • Summarize the importance of incorporating fitness assessments into fitness programs for college age adults.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    124-129 Hallway

Posters will be available for viewing Sunday-Tuesday. Visit with the presenters to ask questions during Poster Attending Hour on Sunday 10:30-11:30am

Brent Beggs, Professor, Illinois State University; Daniel Elkins, PhD, Associate Vice President for Academic Fiscal Management, Illinois State University; Dawn Pote, CRSS, Executive Director, Campus Recreation and Student Fitness Center, Illinois State University

This poster will share the path for development of the Eight at State initiative at Illinois State University. From organizational structure changes to the determination of the dimensions used, innovation and benchmarking are used to create a path from departments sharing initiatives to truly infusing collaboration into the campus environment. Academic partners, as well as Student Affairs colleagues, are shown in this road map to campus change.

Learning Objectives
  • Define a true and successful partnership in the elevation of well-being.
  • List at least three nationally recognized programs for shared responsibilities in programming and identify departments where synergy can be created and celebrated within those programs.

   Tuesday, April 21: 8:30 am-9:30 am    Room 227 AB

Designed around a specific topic area or constituent group for a small sized audience,these sessions are offered to provide opportunities for attendees to converse on community issues in a less structured environment.

   Tuesday, April 21: 9:45 am-10:45 am    Room 227 AB

Designed around a specific topic area or constituent group,these sessions are offered to provide opportunities for attendees to converse on community issues in a less structured environment. To allow for attendee input on topics to offer, some Community Connection topics will be announced closer to the conference date.

   Tuesday, April 21: 1:15 pm-2:15 pm    Room 227 AB

Designed around a specific topic area or constituent group for a small sized audience,these sessions are offered to provide opportunities for attendees to converse on community issues in a less structured environment.

   Monday, April 20: 3:45 pm-4:45 pm    Room 227 AB

Designed around a specific topic area or constituent group for a small sized audience,these sessions are offered to provide opportunities for attendees to converse on community issues in a less structured environment.

   Monday, April 20: 2:30 pm-3:30 pm    Room 227 AB

Designed around a specific topic area or constituent group for a small sized audience,these sessions are offered to provide opportunities for attendees to converse on community issues in a less structured environment.

   Tuesday, April 21: 11:00 am-noon    Room 227 AB

Designed around a specific topic area or constituent group for a small sized audience,these sessions are offered to provide opportunities for attendees to converse on community issues in a less structured environment.

   Sunday, April 19: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 227 AB

Designed around a specific topic area or constituent group for a small sized audience,these sessions are offered to provide opportunities for attendees to converse on community issues in a less structured environment.

   Sunday, April 19: 8:00 am-9:00 am    Room 227 AB

Designed around a specific topic area or constituent group,these sessions are offered to provide opportunities for attendees to converse on community issues in a less structured environment. To allow for attendee input on topics to offer, some Community Connection topics will be announced closer to the conference date.

   Sunday, April 19: 9:15 am-10:15 am    Room 227 AB

Designed around a specific topic area or constituent group,these sessions are offered to provide opportunities for attendees to converse on community issues in a less structured environment. To allow for attendee input on topics to offer, some Community Connection topics will be announced closer to the conference date.

   Monday, April 20: 10:30 am-11:30 am    Room 227 AB

Designed around a specific topic area or constituent group for a small sized audience,these sessions are offered to provide opportunities for attendees to converse on community issues in a less structured environment. To allow for attendee input on topics to provide, topics for Community Connection sessions will be announced closer to the conference date.

   Monday, April 20: 8:00 am-9:30 am    Room 227 AB

Designed around a specific topic area or constituent group,these sessions are offered to provide opportunities for attendees to converse on community issues in a less structured environment. To allow for attendee input on topics to offer, some Community Connection topics will be announced closer to the conference date.

   Monday, April 20: 12:45 pm-1:30 pm    Fitness Forum in the Expo Hall

Lauren George, Savvier

A fusion of NON STOP cardio and strength that blends techniques from ballet, Pilates and Fitness. This class will leave you feeling graceful, strong, and elegant! No fancy dance choreography or prior ballet knowledge required. If you love the cardio portions of a barre class, you will love Balletone. Come join Lauren as we test out this new format!

   Monday, April 20: 6:45 am-7:30 am    Fitness Forum in the Expo Hall

Stephanie Lyons, President – Barre Intensity, Barre Intensity

Feel the difference. Barre Intensity combines attributes of Pilates, dance, and functional fitness training to present a powerful barre fitness class. You’ll experience small isolated movement to fatigue the muscles, large range of motion to elevate the heart rate and sequencing that incorporates upper and lower body to make every minute count.

   Monday, April 20: 9:30 am-10:15 am    Fitness Forum in the Expo Hall

Gia Lucy, Aqua Body Strong

Workout on land with the sensation of working out on the water. This dynamic core stability circuit class will have you burning calories, increasing strength, balance, endurance, and focus while having the time of your life working out on our exclusive hybrid stability board (think full-body Bosu) and trampoline! From Pilates, Yoga and Barre inspired moves to pop-ups and “surfing the curl” this is one result-driven workout that you will not want to miss.

   Monday, April 20: 6:30 am-7:30 am    North Hall 5-6

Rise and shine and join us in the Expo Hall! Join Life Fitness in booth #701 for a fitness challenge or visit any one of the vendors offering equipment to test, sweat on, and learn about. You may choose to work out on your own or elevate your heart rate with Barre Intensity® in the Fitness Forum. Whatever you decide to add to your workout, the Expo Hall has something for you!

   Sunday, April 19: 3:00 pm-3:45 pm    Fitness Forum in the Expo Hall

Carolyn Erickson, Savvier Fitness

This brand new format is guaranteed to have your students working their hardest. The self-selected exercises in this new format allow every participant to choose safe, effective exercises that work for them by combining cardio, muscle fitness, core, balance, and strength, with an emphasis on recovery to drive results….. all in one class! You’ve never experienced a workout like this before because when you train in CHAOS, you are ready for anything.

   Sunday, April 19: 4:15 pm-5:00 pm    Fitness Forum in the Expo Hall

Life Fitness Team

This intense, high energy session will get your heart rate pumping as you push yourself through intervals of all-out effort followed by short periods of rest. Using a mix of equipment and body weight, you’ll be sure to torch calories even after you’re finished.

   Monday, April 20: 9:30 am-10:15 am    Life Fitness Booth #701

Life Fitness Team

Test your grit in the Life Fitness booth with our fitness challenge! Winner will receive a gift-filled swag pack. While you’re here, learn about Life Fitness’ newest offerings.

   Monday, April 20: 1:45 pm-2:30 pm    Fitness Forum in the Expo Hall

Garret Garrels, Creator/Owner, Pink Gloves Boxing; Kelly Crosby, Head Coach, Pink Gloves Boxing

Knock out the stress and frustration of the day!! Experience the unique stimulation that Pink Gloves Boxing offers in its circuit based, high-intensity, fun making, community building workout. Strength, agility, power and endurance are all challenged in every PGB session. Reveal YOUR Champion and help others reveal theirs with Pink Gloves Boxing.

   Monday, April 20: 9:30 am-10:15 am    Room 132 A

Darci Kruse, NETA-National Exercise Trainers Association

It’s estimated that one-third of participants in a mainstream yoga class have experienced trauma. Learn about yoga’s effects on the autonomic nervous system, recommended yoga practices and contraindications. Instructor considerations will also be addressed, providing participants with the insight to handle victims of trauma in a mainstream class.

   Monday, April 20: 11:45 am-12:30 pm    Fitness Forum in the Expo Hall

Brandi Bernard, Physical Therapist / Yoga Therapist, YogaFit Training Systems, Inc.

Unite your mind and body in this YogaFit vinyasa-style yoga class containing repetitive flows and long holds which work the muscles in a variety of ways. Isometric contractions and strong pulsing moves create strength and mental focus. Explore yoga breath work to keep your mind and body at ease, even in the most challenging sequences.