Topic: Student Learning Outcomes

Managing/Leading Student Staff; Student Learning Outcomes
Learning within Collegiate Recreation Student Employment 1996
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Monday, April 4 • 3:30pm – 4:30pm
  • Sarasota 1/2/3
  • Sandi Carlisle, CRSS, Northern Illinois University
One way that collegiate recreation programs can contribute to the educational mission is by designing student employment programs that contribute to student learning and development. Learn about a recent doctoral dissertation that identified ways students navigate learning within the collegiate recreation work experience.
Core Competencies: Human Resource Management; Research & Evaluation; Personal & Professional Qualities; Philosophy & Theory
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify a minimum of three ways to build a learning culture for collegiate recreation student employees.
  2. Identify a minimum of four factors within a novice research framework that promote student employee learning.
  3. Create two strategies to develop the skills student employees need in their careers within the collegiate recreation student employment setting.
Student Learning Outcomes; Health/Wellbeing
Digital Badges 1994
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 8:30am – 9:30am
  • Tampa 1/2/3
  • Michelle Whipple, University of Missouri-Columbia; Jenny Strickland, Purdue University
Improve the process for capturing learning taking place outside the classroom through the use of digital badges. These badges tie learning outcomes and assessments together into one fun, interactive platform that enables student employees and participants to engage in exciting ways.
Core Competencies: Research & Evaluation; Programming
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify components necessary to creating a digital badge that demonstrates user competencies and achievements.
  2. Identify methods to assess learning outcomes through the use of surveys, quizzes, reflection journal submissions, video demonstrations, photo submissions, discussions, blog posts, etc.
  3. Identify strategies to create a culture of assessment through the incorporation of students into the learning outcomes and assessment development process.
Student Learning Outcomes; Managing/Leading Student Staff
A House United: Partnering with Academics for the Advancement of Collegiate Recreation 1638
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 9:45am – 10:45am
  • Miami 1/2/3
  • Mike Ackerman, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Heather Sanderson, Ed.D., NC State University; Matt Hartman, The Ohio State University
What partnerships could you develop to connect with the academic mission of your institution? In this session, attendees will learn about the nitty-gritty details of collaborating with academic units from offering trainings and programs for academic credit to developing relationships with key academic stakeholders for mutually-beneficial initiatives. Emphasis will be placed on real-life examples with the goal of illuminating how these collaborations and partnerships can both benefit students and your department’s connection to the academic mission of your campus.
Core Competencies: Programming; Philosophy & Theory; Human Resource Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify the rationale for offering academic credit for collegiate recreation programs and trainings as well as the challenges and benefits of doing so.
  2. Learn how to establish collaborations with academic units for high-impact division-wide initiatives, research and funding opportunities, and service engagement.
  3. Learn about the faculty perspective and the culture of academic affairs to recognize new means of partnership.
Student Learning Outcomes; Managing/Leading Student Staff
The Husky Experience: a New Student Learning Outcomes Initiative in Recreational Sports at the University of Washington 1805
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 9:45am – 10:45am
  • Naples 1/2/3
  • Luis Bowden, University of Washington- Seattle Campus; Jessica Norman, University of Washington- Seattle Campus; Julie Schroeder, University of Washington- Seattle Campus
Student employees play a key role in campus rec operations and programming. The Husky Experience at the University of Washington is an initiative striving to help students identify the meaning and value of their work both inside and outside of the classroom. Our intentional approach to student learning outcomes seeks to connect the dots between the classroom, work-based learning at rec sports, and their future careers. Students have said that although they are confident in their academic abilities, they often are not sure how their overall UW experience translates to life after graduation. And Employers report that students do not always know how to effectively articulate their strengths and transferable skills. As a part of the Division of Student Life at UW, it is the responsibility of rec sports to help students know and understand what they are learning and gaining in their work on campus. This is so they can recognize and articulate the value of their UW experience to employers. Learn more about the Husky Experience and this initiative during this session.
Core Competencies: Human Resource Management; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify key stake holders in their organization and/or university who can assist in the development and implementation of an experienced based initiative in their department and/or on their campus.
  2. Identify aspects of an experienced based initiative that provide professional development opportunities, recognize achievements, and engage student staff.
Intramurals/Officiating/Extramurals; Student Learning Outcomes
Building Bridges: A Collaboration Between Intramural Sports and First Year Experience (FYE) Departments 1844
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 9:45am – 10:45am
  • Sarasota 1/2/3
  • Daniel Gardner, The George Washington University
Recreation programs and First Year Experience (FYE) departments or committees share many common goals or learning outcomes. Learn how GW Intramural Sports revitalized a defunct Residence Hall Cup to build community and self-efficacy among first year students.
Core Competencies: Programming; Research & Evaluation
Learning Objectives:
  1. Articulate at least two objectives of First Year Experience programs
  2. Identify at least one connection between your Intramural Sports program goals and those of FYE
  3. Craft a plan with at least one specific way to incorporate your first year cohort in Intramural Sports programming
Student Learning Outcomes; Managing/Leading Student Staff
Assessing the Learning Outcomes for Campus Recreation Student Employees 1759
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 9:45am – 10:45am
  • Tallahassee 1/2/3
  • Jami Houston, University of Illinois At Urbana- Champaign
The campus recreation department at the University of Illinois has been tasked with assessing student learning outcomes that have been developed by student affairs. These outcomes coalesce broadly around student career and leadership skills, multicultural competencies, wellness, and wellbeing. Lead investigators Ed Morford (Assistant Director, Assessment) and Jami Houston (Assistant Director, Student Development) will lead a training and development initiative and conduct an empirical, scientifically-grounded assessment to better understand how student employment affects these outcomes. In this session, attendees will learn about the results of their assessment.
Core Competencies: Research & Evaluation; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Articulate two possible outcomes of student employment within collegiate recreation
  2. Identify three ways student employment impacts the college experience from current research
Health/Wellbeing; Student Learning Outcomes
Infusing Wellness in to the Campus Recreation Experience 1818
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 1:30pm – 2:30pm
  • Tampa 1/2/3
  • Lindy Lunkenheimer, Arizona State University; Rachel Cline, Arizona State University
College students are more stressed out than ever before. Emotional and social concerns, financial difficulties, sleep deprivation, troubled relationships, roommate issues, and lack of resources are just some of the stressors facing our students today. By utilizing campus partners, learn how your department can positively influence students’ well-being to create a culture of wellness within your recreation facility, and to connect the relationship between nutrition and physical activity with other areas of well-being.
Core Competencies: Programming; Personal & Professional Qualities; Philosophy & Theory; Human Resource Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Learn to develop a culture of wellness within your recreation facility where participants experience multiple dimensions of wellness in all program areas.
  2. Enhance understanding of how physical activity and nutrition relate to other areas of well-being including stress management and academic success.
  3. Increase your student staff awareness and engagement in their role as an advocate for wellness.
Managing/Leading Student Staff; Student Learning Outcomes
Designing Effective Lesson Plans for Student Trainings 1775
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Wednesday, April 6 • 8:00am – 9:00am
  • Osceola A
  • Leon Lifschutz, University of Vermont
Whether it’s building staff, intramural referees, or club sports leaders, student trainings are a key component of any recreation department. In this session, attendees will have an opportunity to improve their student trainings and overall staff development by learning how to use lesson planning tools, pedagogy from teacher training programs, and tenets of effective curriculum development.
Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory; Programming; Human Resource Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Learn basic theories regarding learning outcomes, curriculum, and lesson planning development.
  2. Design lesson plans that include learning outcomes and methods of assessment.
  3. Be able to identify and put into practice theories of experiential education.
Managing/Leading Student Staff; Student Learning Outcomes
A Practical Approach to the Collegiate Recreation Student Employee as Student Leader 1766
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Wednesday, April 6 • 10:30am – 11:30am
  • Sun C/1/2/3
  • Cara McFadden, Ph.D., Elon University; Julie Wallace-Carr, Ph.D., James Madison University
Collegiate recreation student employment opportunities are available in a number of programmatic areas like facilities, intramurals, aquatics, fitness, and outdoor adventure. Within most recreation departments, the number of student employees range anywhere from 50 to 500. Typically, these departments are some of the largest providers of student employment opportunities on campuses across the country. The focus of this session will be on developing student employee leadership in collegiate recreation work environments. Information on moving theory into practice and actual examples from institutions ranging from small to large will be provided.
Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory; Human Resource Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify at least two theories related to student employee leadership development.
  2. Be able to articulate at least two examples of student employment leadership development processes used in a campus recreation setting.
  3. Develop an implementation plan for one of the discussed sustainable approaches to developing student employee leadership within your campus recreation department.
Personal/Professional Development; Student Learning Outcomes
Guided Reflections On Work®: Connecting Work and Academics 1771
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Wednesday, April 6 • 10:30am – 11:30am
  • Sun D/4/5/6
  • JT Timmons, RCRSP, University of Iowa; Brian Baxter, University of Iowa
When meaningful connections between learning in the classroom and learning on the job are made evident employment during college helps contribute to student success. Learn how one university uses Guided Reflections On Work® to improve academic success and student job performance.
Core Competencies: Personal & Professional Qualities; Human Resource Management; Philosophy & Theory
Learning Objectives:
  1. Articulate the benefits of being mindful of the connection between work and academics for student employees.
  2. Learn how to incorporate academic support conversations into everyday interactions with students.
  3. Summarize the Iowa Guided Reflections On Work® initiative and determine if something akin to it could be effective at your institution.