Topic: Research/Assessment

Health/Wellbeing; Research/Assessment
Three’s Company: Collaborating Across Departments to Build a Healthy Campus 1797
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs; 1.0 AFAA CEU; 0.1 ACE CEC; 1.0 ACSM CEC
  • Monday, April 4 • 8:00am – 9:00am
  • Osceola A
  • Jessica Kiss, Saginaw Valley State University; Andrea Hamlin, Saginaw Valley State University; John Lowry, Saginaw Valley State University
University wellness programs provide a service that helps individuals lead healthier lifestyles. Sustainable programs thrive when there is collaboration from university administration, human resources, faculty, staff, students, and departments across campus. In this presentation, we will discuss how we developed our employee wellness program with the help of collaborative efforts by human resources, campus recreation, and our Kinesiology Department. Additionally, we will brainstorm ways to create programs, develop programs on a budget, and discuss ideas that can be successful at your university.
Core Competencies: Programming; Human Resource Management; Research & Evaluation
Learning Objectives:
  1. Formulate a plan to build a university employee wellness program from the ground up.
  2. Learn why it’s valuable for campus recreation to collaborate with several departments on campus to support an employee wellness program.
  3. Learn strategies to communicate the benefits of wellness programs with university administration, human resources, faculty, staff, students, and departments across campus.
Revenue Generation/Mindshift/Entrepreneurial; Research/Assessment
Telling the Compelling Story: Submitting the Grant 1857
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Monday, April 4 • 8:00am – 9:00am
  • Tampa 1/2/3
  • Jamie Hoffman, Ed.D., California State University- Sacramento
Identifying funding sources can be challenging. This is why telling a compelling story is critical to successful grant acquisition. Learn advanced techniques in the creative use of words and how to assess the needs of your organization to apply for grants.
Core Competencies: Programming; Research & Evaluation; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify at least ten buzz words to use when writing a grant.
  2. Learn a new way of telling your story for a foundation or grantor.
  3. Lear how to clearly tell your story and stand out from other proposals.
Research/Assessment; Health/Wellbeing
The Emerging Trends Panel Presented by Precor: Wellness Centers; a discussion of how recreation is fulfilling the university mission to ensure wellness on campus 3987
  • Monday, April 4 • 2:15pm – 3:15pm
  • Sanibel 1/2/3
  • David Bowles, CRSS, University of Florida; Caroline Dotts, Georgia Institute of Technology; Chavonne Shorter, Spelman College; Chris Wise, Virginia Tech; Jeff Huskey, RCRSP, South Dakota State University; Jimmy Francis, California State University- Northridge
Wellness centers encompass preventative as well as reactive services including student health, counselling centers, and programing designed to appeal to historically underserved populations. This trend goes beyond facility usage and marks a change in university reporting structures and goals. Campus recreation is being tasked by universities to implement this new concept of wellness on college campuses. This year we are looking at some of the innovative ways that health and wellness are being integrated under the recreation umbrella. Come and learn what each campus is doing differently to meet the needs of students and staff in attaining overall wellness goals, and integrating this aspect of the university mission.
Research/Assessment; Personal/Professional Development
Are you “Clark Kent” or “Superman?” (Presenting and Writing Competencies) 1895
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Monday, April 4 • 3:30pm – 4:30pm
  • Sanibel 1/2/3
  • Duane Crider, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania; Warren Simpson, RCRSP, Ed.D, Angelo State University; Allyn Byars, Angelo State University; Gerard Lyons, Idaho State University; Kayla Peak, Tarleton State University; Peter Titlebaum, Ed.D., University of Dayton; Veronica Snow, Ed.D., Angelo State University
Clark Kent was Superman, yet he kept his talents hidden behind a competent, mild-mannered alias. Likewise, professionals in the fields of recreation, fitness, and wellness tend to hide their “superpower” talents, and skills. Presenting and publishing offer ways to advance your career and showcase your professional talents and skills. NIRSA values these skills as advanced Core Competencies. This presentation will address the most common barriers to presenting and publishing. This presentation will include a panel of professionals experienced in the delivery of professional presentations and successful professional publications.
Core Competencies: Research & Evaluation; Business Management; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify the main barriers to professional presenting and publishing.
  2. Describe how to talk to your professional audience.
  3. Define the basic steps to writing a professional article for an academic or trade publication.
Research/Assessment
Revision of CAS Standards for Recreational Sports Roundtable 2125
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 8:30am – 9:30am
  • Osceola B
  • Douglas Franklin, CRSS, Ph.D., Ohio University (Retired)
The purpose of the roundtable is to discuss the forthcoming revision of the CAS Standards and Guidelines for Recreational Sports Programs. Members of the NIRSA CAS Standards Review Task Force will lead a discussion regarding the revision process and how the standards and guidelines can be revised to better meet the needs of the collegiate recreational sports professionals.
Research/Assessment; Sport Clubs
How Higher Education Administrators Perceive the Role of Club Sports in Recruiting and Retaining Male Students 1855
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 9:45am – 10:45am
  • Osceola 4/5/6
  • Anthony Weaver, Elon University; Cara McFadden, Ph.D., Elon University; Drew Forte, Elon University
A current challenge in higher education is the declining rate of men attending college. In 1970, men represented 58% of undergraduate enrollment. By 2010 that number had dropped to 43%. Given this shift, universities are working to attract male students. Club sports are a potential strategy to help recruit and retain such students. In this session, learn about a study that illustrated how club sports are used at institutions to recruit and retain male students.
Core Competencies: Research & Evaluation
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to explain current research relevant to the expansion and role of club sports in college recruitment and retention.
  2. Identify three themes that emerged from the study regarding the role of club sports in the recruitment and retention of male students.
  3. Learn two strategies for how to leverage the recruitment and retention study when telling the story of collegiate recreation to garner support from key stakeholders like university administration and admissions staff on your campus.
Fitness; Research/Assessment
Interrelationships among College Student Physical Activity, Club and Intramural Sports Participation, and Academic Performance 1760
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs; 1.0 AFAA CEU; 0.1 ACE CEC; 1.0 ACSM CEC
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 9:45am – 10:45am
  • Osceola A
  • James Pivarnik, Ph.D., Michigan State University; Kerri Vasold, Michigan State University; Samantha Deere, Ph.D., Saginaw Valley State University
The results from a preliminary study on the role that campus recreation participation specifically, club and intramural sports has on overall student physical activity and grade point average will be presented on during this session. The research will help form the basis for further inquiry utilizing the rich data set available from the NIRSA/NASPA survey. Results should better define and validate the role of campus recreational sports with several variables that are becoming increasingly important to university administrators.
Core Competencies: Research & Evaluation; Programming; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand the relationship between club and intramural sports participation and academic performance.
  2. Be able to articulate to campus administrators the important relationship between student participation in club and intramural sports and their overall physical activity and grade point average.
Research/Assessment
Research and Assessment Roundtable 1731
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 1:30pm – 2:30pm
  • Sanibel 1/2/3
  • Aaron Kroth, University of Wisconsin- Madison
This roundtable will a include a brief update on what the NIRSA Research and Assessment Committee has accomplished over the past year. It will also provide attendees with updates on current initiatives, and there will be time for an open discussion on current issues members are facing.
Research/Assessment; Personal/Professional Development
NIRSA Championship Series Volunteerism: The Impact on Professional Development 1629
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 2:45pm – 3:45pm
  • Sarasota 1/2/3
  • Jacob Tingle, CRSS,Ed.D., Trinity University; Dan Hazlett, Georgia Institute of Technology
In this session, attendees will see the results of a two-part study on how volunteering for the NIRSA Championship Series affects professional development. Is it possible to create a reliable instrument that evaluates the impact of volunteer experiences at NIRSA Championship Series events? Do volunteers at these events measurably improve their job-related competencies and skills? Attendees will be presented with answers to these questions answers that could have implications for how future NIRSA Championship Series events are staffed, how volunteers are selected and trained, and how host sites for these events are selected.
Core Competencies: Research & Evaluation; Philosophy & Theory
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to describe how campus recreation professionals who volunteer at NIRSA Championship Series events develop job-related competencies.
  2. Learn how to articulate that numerous factors affect a Series volunteer’s professional development including the sport they volunteered for, their number of volunteer experiences, and the NIRSA region where their volunteer experiences took place.
  3. Be able to discuss how the research findings presented in the session might impact future NIRSA Championship Series events.
Research/Assessment
The NIRSA Institutional Data Set: Exploring the Value and Capabilities of the New Benchmarking Platform 1761
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Wednesday, April 6 • 8:00am – 9:00am
  • Sarasota 1/2/3
  • Nicole Olmeda, CRSS, The University of Texas At Austin; Stacey Hall, Ph.D., RCRSP, CRSS, University of New Hampshire
The NIRSA Institutional Data Set was recently transitioned to a new and improved platform, which offers informative and easy-to-use benchmarking and assessment capabilities. This session will discuss the many ways the Institutional Data Set can be used as a valuable benchmarking tool. Participants will better understand how to enter their campus data and explore the reporting functions and capabilities available through the new platform, as well as the ways these functions can be used to gain valuable insight into their programs and services.
Core Competencies: Research & Evaluation
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand what the NIRSA Institutional Data Set is.
  2. Learn how to enter institutional member data, access reporting functions, and use reports as benchmarking tools.
  3. Discover the value the Institutional Data Set can bring to institutional member campuses and the profession as a whole.
Risk Management/Legal Issues; Research/Assessment
Risk Management Best Practices 1777
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Wednesday, April 6 • 9:15am – 10:15am
  • Sun C/1/2/3
  • Ian McGregor, Ph.D., Ian McGregor & Associates; George Brown, CRSS, Ph.D., The University of Alabama
McGregor & Associates has created the new Best Practices Risk Assessment Tool, a comprehensive series of risk management best practices for 16 recreation program and facility areas. In this sessions, learn how these best practices were developed, tested, and piloted at NIRSA member schools. Also learn about the implications of creating a large national database related to risk management. The session will also cover roll-out plans for this new tool and explain how attendees can use it.
Core Competencies: Legal Liability & Risk Management; Research & Evaluation; Business Management; Programming
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand the difference between best practices and standards, and learn about the advantages of using a best practices approach to risk assessment.
  2. Understand why best practices are not all of equal priority, and how they can be prioritized and weighted to produce an effective scoring system used to benchmark schools.
  3. Understand the implications related to guiding risk management priorities that the Best Practices Risk Assessment Tool has for NIRSA schools.
Research/Assessment; Sustainable Communities
Campus through Their Eyes: Exploring Leisure, Involvement, and Social Integration with African American Male Undergraduates 1782
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Wednesday, April 6 • 9:15am – 10:15am
  • Tallahassee 1/2/3
  • Anthony Patterson, North Carolina Central University
African American male undergraduates have one of the lowest graduation rates among all college students. Come learn about the opportunities and challenges these young men face both academically and in regards to leisure activities. The qualitative research this session will present on was focused on African American male undergraduates from low socioeconomic status backgrounds as they attended predominantly white institutions. It looked at the struggles they faced to connect with the larger campus community. Practical implications for campus recreation professionals based on student interviews and an analysis of literature will be discussed.
Core Competencies: Research & Evaluation; Philosophy & Theory; Programming
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand leisure constraints African American male undergraduates from low socioeconomic backgrounds face at predominantly white institutions.
  2. Learn about structured and informal leisure and recreation spaces that create a sustainable and inclusive campus community.
  3. Design creative solutions to support the social integration of African American male undergraduates into the larger campus population.