Topic: Managing/Leading Student Staff

Risk Management/Legal Issues; Managing/Leading Student Staff
The Evolution of an EAP: What We Learned from Real-Life Emergencies and How We Adapted 1645
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Monday, April 4 • 8:00am – 9:00am
  • Sarasota 1/2/3
  • Robert Weeks, University of Cincinnati
Every facility faces emergency situations, and so every facility has plans in place to handle them. This presentation will show how real-life situations can be used to change your department’s Emergency Action Plan (EAP) and how you can incorporate these situations into your department’s drills. Presenters will also explore unusual situations that may not yet have a plan in place to guide your team’s response.
Core Competencies: Legal Liability & Risk Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Observe how action taken to improve response from critical incidents impacted performance in future emergencies.
  2. Learn how to draw from real-life situations and incorporate difficulties into an EAP and drill program.
  3. Identify a number of unusual emergency scenarios and begin prepare for them before the occur.
Managing/Leading Professional Staff; Managing/Leading Student Staff
Socially Sustainable Staffing: A Discussion of Organizational Leadership Theories in Happiness, Energy, and Anarchy 1524
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Monday, April 4 • 8:00am – 9:00am
  • Sun C/1/2/3
  • Megan Krone, San Diego State University
This session will explore non-traditional, yet easily-integrated, staffing practices and models that can transform a workplace into a joyful, thriving, inclusive community. This discussion will focus on organizational leadership theories, research, and practices in the emerging disciplines of happiness, energy, and anarchy. (Yes, anarchy.) There will be opportunities for attendees to share examples of current socially sustainable staffing practices.
Core Competencies: Human Resource Management; Personal & Professional Qualities; Philosophy & Theory
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to articulate the concept and importance of social sustainability.
  2. Learn at least one socially sustainable model or theory.
  3. Learn at least two socially sustainable practices to implement on their campuses.
Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion; Managing/Leading Student Staff
Interculturally-Focused Student Hiring: Beyond the Buzz Words 1902
  • Monday, April 4 • 2:15pm – 3:15pm
  • Sarasota 1/2/3
  • Emily Wilk, New York University; Mark Hoying, University of Dayton; Melissa Longino, University of Dayton
When we intentionally and actively seek to diversify our student employee team and create an inclusive environment for students across a full range of group identities, we ultimately shape the culture of the department and support individual and collective success. This session will explore strategies and initiatives for recruiting, interviewing, and selecting student staff.
Core Competencies: Human Resource Management; Philosophy & Theory; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify systematic barriers to equality and inclusivity within recruitment and hiring practices.
  2. Explore alternative interview methods to embrace diverse learning styles, personality types, and cultural values.
  3. Apply an understanding of cultural competency, social justice, and inclusion to establish a framework for candidate selection.
Managing/Leading Student Staff; Student Learning Outcomes
Learning within Collegiate Recreation Student Employment 1996
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Monday, April 4 • 3:30pm – 4:30pm
  • Sarasota 1/2/3
  • Sandi Carlisle, CRSS, Northern Illinois University
One way that collegiate recreation programs can contribute to the educational mission is by designing student employment programs that contribute to student learning and development. Learn about a recent doctoral dissertation that identified ways students navigate learning within the collegiate recreation work experience.
Core Competencies: Human Resource Management; Research & Evaluation; Personal & Professional Qualities; Philosophy & Theory
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify a minimum of three ways to build a learning culture for collegiate recreation student employees.
  2. Identify a minimum of four factors within a novice research framework that promote student employee learning.
  3. Create two strategies to develop the skills student employees need in their careers within the collegiate recreation student employment setting.
Managing/Leading Professional Staff; Managing/Leading Student Staff
New Directions: Student Leadership in Collegiate Recreation 1981
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Monday, April 4 • 3:30pm – 4:30pm
  • Sun C/1/2/3
  • Cara McFadden, Ph.D., Elon University
This session will provide an overview of the publication of a New Directions in Student Leadership volume focused on student leadership in collegiate recreation. The presenters will highlight leadership development models and recent research reports linking recreation programming with the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership (MSL). In addition, MSL data connected to recreation will be shared.
Core Competencies: Personal & Professional Qualities; Programming; Philosophy & Theory
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to explain leadership models used in the Fall 2015 New Directions for Student Leadership volume.
  2. Be able to link research findings to campus-based recreation activities.
Managing/Leading Student Staff; Managing/Leading Professional Staff
Work Hard, Play Harder 1965
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 8:30am – 9:30am
  • Miami 1/2/3
  • Chett Miller, UCLA; Jenny Rodgers, Clemson University
Gamification is one of the hottest topics transforming how people and organizations approach work in both the planning and execution of their daily responsibilities. Gamification seeks to take what makes games fun and apply those attributes play, transparency, competition and design to a range of real-world work endeavors. Supervisors can incorporate this into recruitment and training, task management, and customer service in an effort to help employees enjoy coming to work, increase productivity, and foster professional and personal growth. This session will explore the differences and similarities between work and play to gain an understanding of why games are important and how you can incorporate them into your own managerial style.
Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory; Human Resource Management; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Develop an understanding of the difference between work-life balance and work-play balance.
  2. Examine what competition means and how to apply it to your management style.
  3. Learn how to incorporate play more specifically “gamification” into your management of student staff.
Managing/Leading Student Staff; Personal/Professional Development
Applying the Multi-institutional Study of Leadership Findings and the Social Change Model to Collegiate Recreation 1863
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 8:30am – 9:30am
  • Naples 1/2/3
  • Gordon Nesbitt, CRSS, Ph.D., Millersville University of Pennsylvania
This presentation will describe the key findings or the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership (MSL) and how these findings can be incorporated into recreational sports programs.
Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory; Personal & Professional Qualities; Human Resource Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to define the key findings of the MSL.
  2. Learn the seven concepts of the Social Change Model of Leadership.
  3. Learn how to implement leadership self-efficacy, key findings from the MSL, and the Social Change Model of Leadership in your programs.
Student Learning Outcomes; Managing/Leading Student Staff
A House United: Partnering with Academics for the Advancement of Collegiate Recreation 1638
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 9:45am – 10:45am
  • Miami 1/2/3
  • Mike Ackerman, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Heather Sanderson, Ed.D., NC State University; Matt Hartman, The Ohio State University
What partnerships could you develop to connect with the academic mission of your institution? In this session, attendees will learn about the nitty-gritty details of collaborating with academic units from offering trainings and programs for academic credit to developing relationships with key academic stakeholders for mutually-beneficial initiatives. Emphasis will be placed on real-life examples with the goal of illuminating how these collaborations and partnerships can both benefit students and your department’s connection to the academic mission of your campus.
Core Competencies: Programming; Philosophy & Theory; Human Resource Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify the rationale for offering academic credit for collegiate recreation programs and trainings as well as the challenges and benefits of doing so.
  2. Learn how to establish collaborations with academic units for high-impact division-wide initiatives, research and funding opportunities, and service engagement.
  3. Learn about the faculty perspective and the culture of academic affairs to recognize new means of partnership.
Student Learning Outcomes; Managing/Leading Student Staff
The Husky Experience: a New Student Learning Outcomes Initiative in Recreational Sports at the University of Washington 1805
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 9:45am – 10:45am
  • Naples 1/2/3
  • Luis Bowden, University of Washington- Seattle Campus; Jessica Norman, University of Washington- Seattle Campus; Julie Schroeder, University of Washington- Seattle Campus
Student employees play a key role in campus rec operations and programming. The Husky Experience at the University of Washington is an initiative striving to help students identify the meaning and value of their work both inside and outside of the classroom. Our intentional approach to student learning outcomes seeks to connect the dots between the classroom, work-based learning at rec sports, and their future careers. Students have said that although they are confident in their academic abilities, they often are not sure how their overall UW experience translates to life after graduation. And Employers report that students do not always know how to effectively articulate their strengths and transferable skills. As a part of the Division of Student Life at UW, it is the responsibility of rec sports to help students know and understand what they are learning and gaining in their work on campus. This is so they can recognize and articulate the value of their UW experience to employers. Learn more about the Husky Experience and this initiative during this session.
Core Competencies: Human Resource Management; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify key stake holders in their organization and/or university who can assist in the development and implementation of an experienced based initiative in their department and/or on their campus.
  2. Identify aspects of an experienced based initiative that provide professional development opportunities, recognize achievements, and engage student staff.
Managing/Leading Student Staff; Managing/Leading Professional Staff
Implementing High-Impact Leadership Development Practices in Your Collegiate Recreation Program 1982
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 9:45am – 10:45am
  • Sun C/1/2/3
  • Beththena Johnson, The Ohio State University; Rob Jech, The Ohio State University
The Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership (MSL) has published a report that outlines four high-impact practices to best help facilitate leadership development for college students. In this session, we will outline how The Ohio State University is implementing these high-impact practices. All participants who attend the session will receive a link for a draft manual that outlines a variety of activities that can be used across recreation programs and with various student groups.
Core Competencies: Programming; Personal & Professional Qualities; Philosophy & Theory
Learning Objectives:
  1. Explain leadership models best used in campus-based recreation activities.
  2. Be able to link research findings to campus-based recreation activities.
Student Learning Outcomes; Managing/Leading Student Staff
Assessing the Learning Outcomes for Campus Recreation Student Employees 1759
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 9:45am – 10:45am
  • Tallahassee 1/2/3
  • Jami Houston, University of Illinois At Urbana- Champaign
The campus recreation department at the University of Illinois has been tasked with assessing student learning outcomes that have been developed by student affairs. These outcomes coalesce broadly around student career and leadership skills, multicultural competencies, wellness, and wellbeing. Lead investigators Ed Morford (Assistant Director, Assessment) and Jami Houston (Assistant Director, Student Development) will lead a training and development initiative and conduct an empirical, scientifically-grounded assessment to better understand how student employment affects these outcomes. In this session, attendees will learn about the results of their assessment.
Core Competencies: Research & Evaluation; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Articulate two possible outcomes of student employment within collegiate recreation
  2. Identify three ways student employment impacts the college experience from current research
Managing/Leading Student Staff; Personal/Professional Development
Learning and Leadership at Our Core 1630
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 11:00am – 12:30pm
  • Tallahassee 1/2/3
  • Victoria Lopez-Herrera, The University of Texas at San Antonio; Nigel Harris, The University of Texas At San Antonio
What steers your department’s student development initiatives? Guided by theory and passion, the University of Texas at San Antonio believes student employees are at the core of the department’s ability to carry out its mission and impact the campus community. Through intentional trainings that cultivate an environment of persistence and success, we prepare our student employees for both personal and professional challenges and opportunities. During this interactive presentation, attendees will be able to identify mechanisms that encourage the development of more intentional activities, programs, and initiatives that also align with departmental mission, vision, and values.
Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory; Human Resource Management; Personal & Professional Qualities; Research & Evaluation
Learning Objectives:
  1. Describe two student development theories that can guide the creation of activities, programs, and initiatives focused on helping students realize their potential.
  2. Identify a student-focused program, activity or initiative that could be better aligned with your department’s mission, vision, and values and enhanced by student development theory.
  3. List at least two different assessment tools or strategies for assessing student learning and development.
Personal/Professional Development; Managing/Leading Student Staff
The “Why” of Inspirational Leadership 1618
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 1:30pm – 2:30pm
  • Osceola 1/2/3
  • Emmeline Richards, Georgia Southern University
Great leadership begins with “Why.” Why you do what you do? Why do you believe what you believe? Why do you have faith in your mission? The inspirational author Simon Sinek once said, “Starting with ‘Why’ is what leaders do. Leaders inspire.” In this session, attendees will learn strategies to inspire and motivate others. They will discover how Simon Sinek’s Golden Circle model can help them find their “Why” as well as how the model can enhance their current leadership skills.
Core Competencies: Personal & Professional Qualities; Philosophy & Theory
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand how to use the Golden Circle model to enhance leadership skills.
  2. Identify your “Why” by creating your own Golden Circle.
  3. Learn how to apply Golden Circle leadership strategies to inspire and motivate others.
Intramurals/Officiating/Extramurals; Managing/Leading Student Staff
Encourage the Heart: Officials Incentive Programs and the Student Leadership Challenge 1641
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 1:30pm – 2:30pm
  • Osceola A
  • Andrew Chadick, The University of Texas at San Antonio; Jon Randle, University of Kansas; Kyle LeDuc, Florida Atlantic University
Struggling to retain your intramural sports officials? This session will present information on “Encouraging the Heart” a tenet of the Student Leadership Challenge as well as on various incentive program ideas. The session is intended to help attendees design an incentives program for the officials on their campus.
Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory; Human Resource Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to articulate at least two of the essential elements of “Encouraging the Heart.”
  2. Learn at least two incentive program ideas.
Personal/Professional Development; Managing/Leading Student Staff
How to Tick Off Your Boss! 10 Steps to Hurting Your Career 1814
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Tuesday, April 5 • 2:45pm – 3:45pm
  • Osceola A
  • Kenneth Morton, CRSS, Stephen F Austin State University
Learn which traits to avoid and which to embrace. Whether as a student or as a professional, we often act in ways that undermine the impression that we are a valuable and productive team member. Understanding these traits and how to avoid them can benefit anyone at any level and help them better reach their career goals and objectives. Attendees will have the opportunity to share their own experiences with the group.
Core Competencies: Personal & Professional Qualities; Human Resource Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Learn ten behaviors that are counterproductive to career aspirations.
  2. Self-assess your own behaviors and understand how they can be perceived by others.
  3. Understand how certain behaviors, both positive and negative, can shape a career path.
Personal/Professional Development; Managing/Leading Student Staff
The Discomfort Zone: How to Manage Difficult Conversations 1828
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Wednesday, April 6 • 8:00am – 9:00am
  • Osceola 1/2/3
  • Daniel Bettmann, University of Missouri-St Louis; Katherine Birdsall, Illinois State University; Lindsay Helm, University of Dayton
How do I talk to my student who is having a tough time? As their subordinate, how do I approach my boss with a concern? Regardless of the industry, difficult conversations are a commonality we all will experience at one point or another throughout our careers. When working in an energetic and exciting field like recreation, these conversations may come as a bit of a shock for young professionals, and at times are difficult to approach and navigate. This presentation aims to discuss the different types of difficult conversations you may encounter at work, share how different types of personalities will approach those conversations, and provide advice from some experts in the field.
Core Competencies: Human Resource Management; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify the need for recognizing and fielding difficult conversations as a professional, and understand the different types of difficult conversations you may encounter.
  2. Learn how different personality types may approach or handle difficult conversations.
  3. Learn about research and feedback focused on how to best handle difficult conversations.
Managing/Leading Student Staff; Student Learning Outcomes
Designing Effective Lesson Plans for Student Trainings 1775
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Wednesday, April 6 • 8:00am – 9:00am
  • Osceola A
  • Leon Lifschutz, University of Vermont
Whether it’s building staff, intramural referees, or club sports leaders, student trainings are a key component of any recreation department. In this session, attendees will have an opportunity to improve their student trainings and overall staff development by learning how to use lesson planning tools, pedagogy from teacher training programs, and tenets of effective curriculum development.
Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory; Programming; Human Resource Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Learn basic theories regarding learning outcomes, curriculum, and lesson planning development.
  2. Design lesson plans that include learning outcomes and methods of assessment.
  3. Be able to identify and put into practice theories of experiential education.
Personal/Professional Development; Managing/Leading Student Staff
At the Core of Our Professional Development: Designing Transformational Graduate Assistantships with an Eye on NIRSA’s Core Competencies 1903
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Wednesday, April 6 • 9:15am – 10:15am
  • Osceola A
  • Mark Hoying, University of Dayton
If you currently or hope to one day supervise a graduate assistant in collegiate recreation, this is the session for you! We have reviewed all (200+) of the graduate assistant position descriptions posted to bluefishjobs.com in the 2013-2014 year. We have linked those experiences to the NIRSA professional competencies and cannot wait to share the results! Come along as we discuss trends in these assistantships, how they pair with different degree programs, and most importantly how you can use our findings to better your department, your students, and yourself. We aim to challenge the thought process on how assistantships are designed and demonstrate that two years of experience and a master’s degree in a related field can be the transformational experience that our future professionals need.
Core Competencies: Human Resource Management; Philosophy & Theory; Personal & Professional Qualities; Research & Evaluation
Learning Objectives:
  1. Demonstrate the ability to effectively link a graduate assistant’s work and academic experience to the NIRSA core competencies.
  2. Identify two ways in which a current graduate assistant work and academic experience could be enhanced to better prepare the student for the NIRSA core competencies.
  3. Identify on-campus print and online resources to inform the intentional design of assistantships.
Managing/Leading Student Staff
50 Years of College Student Leadership Development: A Conversation with Susan R. Komives 3929
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Wednesday, April 6 • 9:15am – 10:15am
  • Osceola C/D
  • Susan Komives, University of Maryland-College Park
Susan R. Komives is a leading scholar in student leadership development, and is the author of many books including Exploring Leadership, Leadership for a Better World, and The Handbook of Student Leadership Development. Her research includes the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership, the social change model, the relational leadership model, and the leadership identity development model. In this session, Cara McFadden will interview Komives about her nearly 50 years spent advancing student leadership.
Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory; Programming; Research & Evaluation
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to articulate relevant advances related to the evolution of leadership development in higher education.
  2. Be able to describe the importance of intentionally developing student leadership capacity in collegiate recreation environments to stakeholders across campus.
Outdoor; Managing/Leading Student Staff
Herding Cats: the Art and Education of Training Your Trip Staff to Lead Others in the Outdoors 1783
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs,
  • Wednesday, April 6 • 10:30am – 11:30am
  • Sanibel 1/2/3
  • Mike McFall, Old Dominion University; Allison Hughes, The University of Tennessee At Chattanooga; Chris Hendricks, Duke University
As recreation programs are focusing more and more on student-led programs and initiatives, an effective training program is an essential key to the success and safety of these programs. In this session, we’ll discuss the elements needed to develop a strong training program, explore some hurdles linked with various training programs, and learn what is involved with training your staff to uphold university risk management practices. By examining several different training models, participants will gain a better understanding of the ways they can continue to prepare student leaders to plan and facilitate off-campus outings within their program area.
Core Competencies: Human Resource Management; Legal Liability & Risk Management; Programming; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Gain insight regarding the elements needed to develop an effective leadership training program. Additionally, identify the necessary qualities and character traits needed to develop effective student leaders and outstanding adults.
  2. Gain an understanding of the three major hurdles associated with training staff members who lead trips: in-house training vs. certifications, paid vs. unpaid, and year-long mentorship-based training vs. extended week-long field training.
  3. Discover what is involved in training your trip staff to understand and uphold department and university risk management practices while leading other students in off-campus environments.
Managing/Leading Student Staff; Student Learning Outcomes
A Practical Approach to the Collegiate Recreation Student Employee as Student Leader 1766
  • 0.1 NIRSA CEUs
  • Wednesday, April 6 • 10:30am – 11:30am
  • Sun C/1/2/3
  • Cara McFadden, Ph.D., Elon University; Julie Wallace-Carr, Ph.D., James Madison University
Collegiate recreation student employment opportunities are available in a number of programmatic areas like facilities, intramurals, aquatics, fitness, and outdoor adventure. Within most recreation departments, the number of student employees range anywhere from 50 to 500. Typically, these departments are some of the largest providers of student employment opportunities on campuses across the country. The focus of this session will be on developing student employee leadership in collegiate recreation work environments. Information on moving theory into practice and actual examples from institutions ranging from small to large will be provided.
Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory; Human Resource Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify at least two theories related to student employee leadership development.
  2. Be able to articulate at least two examples of student employment leadership development processes used in a campus recreation setting.
  3. Develop an implementation plan for one of the discussed sustainable approaches to developing student employee leadership within your campus recreation department.