Managing/Leading Student Staff; Student Learning Outcomes
029 The Social Change Model of Leadership and Recreation
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Tuesday, March 31 • 9:40am – 10:40am
Grapevine C
Don Stenta, Ph.D., The Ohio State University; and Cara McFadden, Ph.D., Elon University
The Social Change Model of Leadership Development provides an excellent foundation for understanding how leadership can be fully implemented in a recreation setting. This session will outline the model and offer perspectives on how to connect the eight values with student leadership development.
Core Competencies: Personal & Professional Qualities; Philosophy & Theory
Learning Objectives:
  1. Connect the eight values in the social change model of leadership to your recreation program.
  2. Identify and be able to explain at least two ways to link the social change model to student development in recreation.
Leadership Icon
Aquatics; Student Learning Outcomes
040 Long Course Learning: Student Learning Outcomes for Your Aquatics Staff
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Tuesday, March 31 • 10:50am – 11:50am
Texas C
Erin Erford, The University of Texas at Austin
Student learning outcomes aren’t just a trending fad, they are here to stay. Learn how to write, implement, and assess the student learning outcomes for your aquatics environment. This presentation will touch on five specific aquatic outcomes that will equip your staff with the skills to become better leaders and to take ownership of the aquatic center when you’re not there to back them up.
Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory; Human Resource Management; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to articulate what the acronym ABCD means when it comes to writing student learning outcomes.
  2. Create implementation tactics and assessment techniques for aquatics student learning outcomes.
  3. Design student learning outcomes that are tailored to your staff and specific program.
Managing/Leading Student Staff; Student Learning Outcomes
047 Student Staff Development: A Guide to Effective Curriculum and Instruction
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Tuesday, March 31 • 1:30pm – 3:00pm
Grapevine B/4-6
Mark Munguia, The University of Texas at San Antonio
As student affairs practitioners, developing students through employment must remain at the core of what we do. Learn four components that are integral to developing a comprehensive plan for instruction and student learning. This plan will address student success as it relates to development, retention, and career preparation. Participants will learn how to create a curriculum that provides an intentional, consistent, and unified approach towards the development of student staff. The curriculum will also address the need for professionals and the university community to validate every student’s abilities to learn and enhance transferable skills prior to graduation.
Core Competencies: Personal & Professional Qualities; Philosophy & Theory; Research & Evaluation
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify four components necessary to develop an effective student staff development plan that fosters learning and progression.
  2. Identify barriers associated with the development and implementation of a student staff development curriculum.
  3. Understand Dr. Laura Rendón’s Validation Theory as a key component of student learning and success.
Student Learning Outcomes; Managing/Leading Student Staff
051 How Students Navigate Learning within On-Campus College Student Employment
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Tuesday, March 31 • 1:30pm – 3:00pm
Texas C
Sandi Carlisle, CRSS, Northern Illinois University
Recent college-student employment research has focused on the effects of employment on academic success, and on identifying learning outcomes that are a result of the student work experience. Yet, little is known about how that learning occurs and what student affairs professionals can do to optimize learning. Very little attention has been afforded to how on-campus college student employment creates opportunities for learning, how learning occurs within that environment, and what this work experience means for these students. Doctoral research findings will be discussed.
Core Competencies: Research & Evaluation; Philosophy & Theory
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to articulate ways that student employees in campus recreation narrate their past and current experiences as they relate to their learning.
  2. Identify five strategies that college student employees in recreation use to navigate learning within their student employment experience
  3. Understand how student employees’ perceptions of work change over time.
Student Learning Outcomes; Managing/Leading Student Staff
056 New Directions: Student Leadership in Collegiate Recreation
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Tuesday, March 31 • 3:10pm – 4:10pm
Fort Worth 5-6
Don Stenta, Ph.D., The Ohio State University; and Cara McFadden, Ph.D., Elon University
This session will provide updates from NIRSA’s Leadership Commission, including sharing leadership models and recent research reports linking recreation programming with the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership. In addition, the Commission will provide information about the upcoming publication of a New Directions in Student Leadership volume focused on student leadership in collegiate recreation.
Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory; Business Management; Research & Evaluation; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Explain leadership models being used by the NIRSA Leadership Commission.
  2. Discuss the content and focus of a new leadership book due for release in Autumn 2015.
Student Learning Outcomes; Executive
080 Telling Our Story to Employers: Demonstrating the Impact of Co-curricular Experiences including Campus Recreation on Employment-ready Skills
Wednesday, April 1 • 10:00am – 11:00am
Austin 1-3
Adam Peck, Ph.D., Stephen F Austin State University; Catherine Cramp, CRSS, University of Florida; and David Hall, CRSS, Ed.D., Springfield College
As key stakeholders in higher education debate ways to reduce the cost of higher education while improving student learning, the contribution and value added by co-curricular education is often overlooked. This session illustrates how assessment of student learning in co-curricular activities can be used to demonstrate to policymakers that the skills most desired by employers can be gained through student involvement outside of the classroom.
Core Competencies: Personal & Professional Qualities; Business Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Articulate ten skills desired by employers as determined by the survey by the National Associate of Colleges and Employers.
  2. Design an effective assessment of employment skills.
  3. Understand how to package student learning data to demonstrate the impact of co-curricular involvement on your campus.
Student Learning Outcomes; Personal/Professional Development
095 Assessing Student Learning Outcomes at the University of Illinois
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Wednesday, April 1 • 11:10am – 12:10pm
Austin 4-6
Jami Houston, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Learn about a longitudinal assessment initiative on student employment at the University of Illinois. This assessment strives to provide reliable evidence to support the anecdotal perception that employment with collegiate recreation departments contributes to overall leadership, multicultural competency, and wellness. It also examines the impact of collegiate recreation employment on post-graduation employability and job skills improvement. The session will give a brief overview of the process, the assessment tool, the initial results, and the benefits of cross-departmental collaborations.
Core Competencies: Research & Evaluation; Personal & Professional Qualities; Human Resource Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Know three benefits of student assessment on your campus.
  2. Be able to articulate two ways that assessing student development can change and inform your training and program.
  3. Be able to demonstrate a plan to begin an assessment on your campus that would take advantage of cross-departmental collaborations.
Student Learning Outcomes; Micro Session
098 Expanding Your Horizons: Collaborating Between Program Areas
Wednesday, April 1 • 11:10am – 12:10pm
Fort Worth 5-6
Kimmi Sterner, University of Mississippi; Jenna Nales, University of Kentucky; and Vincent Orfano, University of the Pacific
Diversity is more than just differences in culture and identity. Diversifying your experiences within collegiate recreation–and expanding your mindset regarding it–is vital to a well-rounded understanding of the field.
Core Competencies: Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to identify the value of diversity in interdepartmental collaboration as well as understand the importance of interdepartmental collaboration and communication.
Student Learning Outcomes; Micro Session
099 One Event, Endless Possibilities: Changing the Student Dynamic in Event Management
Wednesday, April 1 • 11:10am – 12:10pm
Fort Worth 5-6
William Moore, Boston University; and Jessica Adkisson, Ball State University
Students are highly involved in staffing many events within their campuses. By learning what the true value of working these events are, students will have a greater appreciation and become happy and healthier employees. Come to this session to discover ways to show students the considerable value of working these events.
Core Competencies: Programming
Learning Objectives:
  1. Learn the values students have learned and will learn through event management; see how to integrate student development theory in developing efficient student staff members.
Student Learning Outcomes; Micro Session
100 Project Development: New Ventures within Your Campus Recreation Program
Wednesday, April 1 • 11:10am – 12:10pm
Fort Worth 5-6
Travis Rawe, South Dakota State University; and Courtney Kraemer, Louisiana State University
Campus recreation departments are unique among other campus departments. Learn how campus recreation work together with different departments on campus to create new events for both their programs and for their campuses.
Core Competencies: Programming
Learning Objectives:
  1. See the different processes campus recreation programs take in order to create and run both new and traditional events.
Intramurals/Officiating/Extramurals; Student Learning Outcomes
125 Females in Officiating: Are They Getting All They Need?
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Wednesday, April 1 • 3:00pm – 4:00pm
Grapevine A/1-3
April Flint, RCRSP, Ph.D., Emory University
Whether the sports official is male or female should not be an issue; however, participant reactions and/or societal messages may affect the experience of student intramural sports officials who are female. A study conducted at a southeastern mid-size Division I institution aims to create a base of knowledge on the experiences of female intramural sports officials. The purpose is to understand how working as an intramural sports official contributes to the developmental growth of female college students, and to discover new methods of support and direction for this population.
Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory; Personal & Professional Qualities; Research & Evaluation; Programming
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to recognize and describe how traditional gender roles can affect the experiences of female sports officials and their ability to build relationships with their supervisors and peers.
  2. Be able to articulate how working as an intramural sports official contributes to the developmental growth of female college students.
  3. Identify and explain ways to integrate cultural and gender awareness, education, relationship development, and positive youth development into student staff training and overall intramural programs.
Student Learning Outcomes
131 We ARE the Student Learning Agenda: Campus Recreation’s Place at the Table
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Wednesday, April 1 • 3:00pm – 4:00pm
Texas A-B
John Dugan, Ph.D., Loyola University Chicago
This presentation explores the critical role that campus recreation plays in the student learning agenda. All too often, sport is seen as simply play. This session combines research and the professional knowledge and experience of participants to make direct connections between recreation and student learning. Participants will be introduced to central concepts, make connections with national agendas, and discuss how to best advocate for the critical importance of campus recreation.
Core Competencies: Research & Evaluation; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to articulate the influences of campus recreation on student learning as it is broadly defined.
  2. Learn how to make connections between the work of campus recreation and the student learning agenda.
  3. Learn strategies for advocating on behalf of campus recreation.
Photo – John Dugan
Managing/Leading Student Staff; Student Learning Outcomes
158 Campus Rec Findings from the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership
Thursday, April 2 • 11:00am – Noon
Grapevine 1-3
John Dugan, Ph.D., Loyola University Chicago; and Stacey Hall, CRSS, Ph.D., University of New Hampshire
This presentation will explore ways to build high-impact leadership development experiences for students through campus recreation. Insights stem from more than six years of research with the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership and over 300,000 respondents from over 200 colleges and universities. This presentation will highlight key findings and engage participants in how those findings translate to recreation sport, intramural, and student employee contexts.
Photo – John Dugan