Financial Planning/Fundraising/Entrepreneurial; Executive
013 How to Win Donor Dollars for Your Recreation Program (with or without Help from Your Development Office)
.1 NIRSA CEUs
Tuesday, March 31 • 8:30am – 9:30am
Dallas 5-7
Laura MacDonald, Benefactor Group
There is an increasing expectation that recreation programs will raise funds to help support their programs. And there is also an increasing realization that students who engage in intramural and recreational sports develop stronger long-term ties to their alma maters. Come learn how you can initiate (or strengthen) a fundraising program on your campus.
Core Competencies: Business Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Learn how to work with your campus development office for mutual benefit.
  2. Understand the potential value of individual donations and how they can impact collegiate recreation on your campus.
Executive; Micro Session
018 Building Capacity in Others
Tuesday, March 31 • 8:30am – 9:30am
Grapevine D
Wendy Windsor, CRSS, Louisiana State University; and Becky Dahl, CRSS, University of Arkansas
As an Associate Director you are responsible for making sure that your area is doing what it’s meant to do and that your staff are doing the right things, in the right way. How do you plan to lead your team, to build capacity in your staff? How do you plan to motivate and inspire them? In this session, we will discuss what building capacity means through tools, resources, practical strategies, and participation in the session.
Core Competencies: Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify and articulate 3-5 areas of team development with strategies for implementation.
Executive; Micro Session
019 The New Normal: Re-positioning Yourself in Leadership
Tuesday, March 31 • 8:30am – 9:30am
Grapevine D
Lisa Shea, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
This session will focus on your changing role in leadership when transitioning into an Associate Director role. A primary focus of this session will focus on how to position yourself as part of a leadership team, build and maintain relationships with staff, all while simultaneously balancing the demands of your Director and your direct reports.
Core Competencies: Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Gain insight and understanding of workplace dynamics during the transition into the Associate Director position.
Executive; Micro Session
020 Working as the Right Hand
Tuesday, March 31 • 8:30am – 9:30am
Grapevine D
Sarah Hardin, CRSS, Ph.D., CENTERS, LLC At DePaul University
Differences in departmental structure and culture means that the Associate Director’s role varies greatly between and among institutions. However, in addition to differences created by structure or culture, gaining a different perspective for the role can also aid in success for a department. This session will explore the Associate Director role from the Director’s perspective. Learn what roles and responsibilities various Directors have identified as having the most importance to the organization. The answers may surprise you!
Core Competencies: Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify and articulate at least five expectations Directors have indicated as most important in their Associate Directors.
Executive
039 Panel Discussion: Current Issues in Higher Education Impacting Collegiate Recreation
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Tuesday, March 31 • 10:50am – 11:50am
Texas 1-3
Eric Nickel, CRSS, James Madison University; George Brown, CRSS, Ph.D., The University of Alabama; Michael Deluca, CRSS, UCLA; and Maureen McGonagle, CRSS, CENTERS, LLC At DePaul University
This panel of directors will lead discussion on key emerging issues in higher education that are currently impacting collegiate recreation. This session will focus on opportunities for recreation programs to address these issues and provide leadership on campus.
Core Competencies: Business Management; Philosophy & Theory; Research & Evaluation
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify 3-5 higher education issues that either are currently impacting collegiate recreation units.
  2. Articulate current ‘best practices’ in collegiate recreation for addressing these challenges.
  3. Recognize opportunities at their own campus to provide leadership and support.
Strategic Planning; Executive
052 Divisional Realignment: Reframing Your Campus Recreation Department
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Tuesday, March 31 • 3:10pm – 4:10pm
Austin 1-3
Timber Hines, RCRSP, Emory University; and Andrea Trinklein, Ph.D., Emory University
What happens when your university has a divisional realignment? While trying to be integrative, innovative, and positive, change is still difficult for everyone. This session will discuss how a campus’ recreation department can be reframed to provide high-quality recreational programs and expand their services to meet the needs of its changing student population.
Core Competencies: Business Management; Philosophy & Theory
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify at least four communication strategies to keep staff abreast of current departmental and divisional actions.
  2. Identify techniques for ensuring staff deliver high quality recreation service throughout the transition process.
  3. Identify existing assessment tools and metrics that may provide support to leadership during a reorganization.
Executive; Financial Planning/Fundraising/Entrepreneurial
070 It All Adds Up To the Bottom Line
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Wednesday, April 1 • 8:00am – 9:15am
Fort Worth 5-6
Sid Gonsoulin, CRSS, University of Southern Mississippi; Eric Jontra, Clear Marketing Concepts; and Cassie Varnado, University of Southern Mississippi
As financial resources in higher education are being scrutinized and tough decisions are made in determining Campus Recreation budgets, creative avenues for resource development can adjust the bottom line. This session will depict a number of ways that Campus Recreation departments create and manage successful special events and programs that make money as a result of teaming up with third-party partners and sponsors. Net revenue provides other opportunities for the department to offer amenities, not only for participants in a respective special event but also support for other programs. This session will show you how to identify the key value elements of your Campus Recreation department, assign value to them, and generate revenue from sponsors and advertisers who want to reach your audience. Large, small, Jr. College  it doesn’t matter the size of your institution, it all boils down to simple math.
Core Competencies: Business Management; Human Resource Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to identify the difference between recruiting sponsors vs. long term partners in addition to being able to identify components that build long term partnerships.
  2. Be able to identify the economic impact of special events and be able to identify the value elements within their campus recreation department for the purpose of obtaining sponsorships / advertising revenue.
  3. Be able to assign an accurate value those elements based on their specific market and be able to communicate effectively with potential sponsors / advertisers in their specific market.
Neptune Logo
Student Learning Outcomes; Executive
080 Telling Our Story to Employers: Demonstrating the Impact of Co-curricular Experiences including Campus Recreation on Employment-ready Skills
Wednesday, April 1 • 10:00am – 11:00am
Austin 1-3
Adam Peck, Ph.D., Stephen F Austin State University; Catherine Cramp, CRSS, University of Florida; and David Hall, CRSS, Ed.D., Springfield College
As key stakeholders in higher education debate ways to reduce the cost of higher education while improving student learning, the contribution and value added by co-curricular education is often overlooked. This session illustrates how assessment of student learning in co-curricular activities can be used to demonstrate to policymakers that the skills most desired by employers can be gained through student involvement outside of the classroom.
Core Competencies: Personal & Professional Qualities; Business Management
Learning Objectives:
  1. Articulate ten skills desired by employers as determined by the survey by the National Associate of Colleges and Employers.
  2. Design an effective assessment of employment skills.
  3. Understand how to package student learning data to demonstrate the impact of co-curricular involvement on your campus.
Executive; Financial Planning/Fundraising/Entrepreneurial
123 Amazon…Nike…Who’s Next? Seven-Figure Partnership Deals
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Wednesday, April 1 • 3:00pm – 4:00pm
Dallas 5-7
Thomas Dison, CRSS, The University of Texas at Austin; Deb Johnson, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; John Campbell, CRSS, University of California-Davis; Michael Deluca, CRSS, UCLA; Stuart Halsall, University of Denver; and Tim Moore, Boston University
Need more money in your campus recreation budget? Have you considered taking corporate sponsorship to the next level? Can you imagine signing a seven-figure deal with a corporate partner? Hear from a panel of NIRSA member experts who have changed the game on revenue generation through corporate partnerships. Learn what it takes to develop a professional competency in raising corporate sponsorship dollars. The panel will discuss the patience, perseverance and creativity required to develop relationships with corporations. Learn the art of positioning and the math of valuing what your campus recreation department has to offer. And get ready for plenty of opportunity to learn new skills navigating internal campus politics. Come and hear from your colleagues about the long and winding road to successful corporate sponsorship.
Core Competencies: Business Management; Philosophy & Theory
Learning Objectives:
  1. Learn how to distinguish between recruiting sponsors and developing long-term partners.
  2. Learn how to value campus recreation elements while negotiating with potential corporate sponsors.
  3. Be able to identify the components that build long-term partnerships.
Personal/Professional Development; Executive
127 Professional and Organizational Maturity in Collegiate Recreation
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Wednesday, April 1 • 3:00pm – 4:00pm
Grapevine C
Bill Crockett, RCRSP, University of Maryland (Baltimore), The Founding Campus; and Grady Sheffield, RCRSP, Towson University
Recreation professionals and departments understand the value of professional development, but have a hard time articulating what is meant by professional maturity and organizational maturity. This session explores these concepts and relationships.
Core Competencies: Philosophy & Theory; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Develop an understanding of the maturation stages and processes involved in the Professional Maturity Continuum for Collegiate Recreation Professional, and learn how to align personal and professional goals to these various stages.
  2. Develop an understanding of the maturation stages and processes involved in the Organizational Maturity Model for Collegiate Recreation Departments, and learn how to align departmental goals to these various stages.
  3. Develop a model of reflective thinking about professional and organizational maturity.
Personal/Professional Development; Executive
134 The KEE to Organizational Success: Knowledgeable, Efficient, Engaged
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Thursday, April 2 • 8:40am – 9:40am
Austin 1-3
George Deines, Counsilman Hunsaker
Organizational success depends on having the right team members in place–specifically those that are knowledgeable, efficient, and engaged. This session will analyze these three areas of staff proficiency and how they affect organizations, as well as develop a training matrix to get KEE staff members into your organization.
Core Competencies: Human Resource Management; Facility Management, Planning & Design
Learning Objectives:
  1. Be able to identify key areas of staff effectiveness and deficiency, and learn about survey results from guests of organizations.
  2. Identify three key areas of staff proficiency and how they affect organizational success.
  3. Develop a training matrix–one that addresses the three key areas of staff proficiency: knowledge, efficiency, and engagement–to implement in your organization.
Financial Planning/Fundraising/Entrepreneurial; Executive
153 The Future of Collegiate Recreation
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Thursday, April 2 • 11:00am – Noon
Austin 1-3
Tim Moore, Boston University; and Alexander Southall, Boston University
With the advances in modern recreation facilities, and the increasing cost of higher education, the funding of collegiate recreation programs has reached a new period in its history. Learn about the factors necessitating the change in funding and what the research may indicate for the future of your program.
Core Competencies: Business Management; Programming; Philosophy & Theory
Learning Objectives:
  1. Articulate two changes in the history of funding for collegiate recreation.
  2. Identify two environmental factors impacting change in the financial landscape of collegiate recreation.
  3. Be able to explain two ways you would need to alter your program to address the changing financial landscape.
Executive; Research/Assessment
156 NIRSA Core Competencies: How Competent Are You?
0.1 NIRSA CEUs
Thursday, April 2 • 11:00am – Noon
Dallas 5-7
Jill Sturts, RCRSP, Indiana University-Bloomington; and Sarah Young, Ph.D., CRSS, Indiana University-Bloomington
Want to be intentional in structuring your staff training and development in accordance with the identified NIRSA core competencies? An importance-performance analysis of the NIRSA core competencies reveals the competencies that professionals find to be most and least important, while also identifying areas for the profession that are in need of improvement. The gaps between importance and performance in each competency area will inform administrators and educators alike on the aspects of collegiate recreation and where they should focus training and learning.
Core Competencies: Research & Evaluation; Personal & Professional Qualities
Learning Objectives:
  1. Understand how to utilize results from a member-to-member survey on the NIRSA core competencies to help inform staff training and professional development.
  2. Identify personal areas of strength, challenges related to NIRSA core competencies, and areas to target for improvement.
  3. Develop training and education topics for staff that are based on the results of an importance-performance analysis of the NIRSA core competencies.